What are the best / worst months to apply for a job in Singapore?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Harley Grant



What are the best / worst months to apply for a job in Singapore?

There is never a better / worse month to apply for a job in Singapore. because there is already a severe excess in some skills, while cheaper foreigners are arriving here.

Now, with the economy weakened by covid19, more companies are likely to be cutting the workforce even further… the possibility of getting a job in Singapore is not only slim, but almost impossible.

December (New Years Eve) and February (Chinese New Year) may not be that great for applying for jobs.

March to June are the best.

We wish you all the best.

Vinay Math

http://www.flintex.com.sg

Specialized recruitment consultancy in Singapore

In short, is it difficult to get a job in Singapore? Yes.
Is it especially difficult to get a job in Singapore if you are not a public relations or citizen? It depends.

Let me deal with the first part of the question. Singapore has one of the most open and competitive labor markets. Singapore is consistently ranked among the top 5 cities in the world to work / live and is one of the best, if not the best, place to work in Asia. Furthermore, Singapore's workforce is highly educated. 27% of residents have a university degree or higher. In contrast, competition for a job in Singapore is intense because

Keep reading

In short, is it difficult to get a job in Singapore? Yes.
Is it especially difficult to get a job in Singapore if you are not a public relations or citizen? It depends.

Let me deal with the first part of the question. Singapore has one of the most open and competitive labor markets. Singapore is consistently ranked among the top 5 cities in the world to work / live and is one of the best, if not the best, place to work in Asia. Furthermore, Singapore's workforce is highly educated. 27% of residents have a university degree or higher. On the contrary, the competition for a job in Singapore is intense because you are not only competing with the relatively highly educated resident population, but also with the mobile global talents who are drawn to the opportunities of working here.

Now my answer above assumes you are referring to a PME (Professional Executive Manager) or typical "white collar" jobs. You may ask if this still applies to "manual" jobs. Unfortunately, the competition for "manual" jobs is also intense. Singapore is a small and fairly prosperous island surrounded by larger countries that are less prosperous. This means that Singapore is a very attractive place to work for the region's "blue-collar" workers. Singapore represents a destination not far from home, but one that offers better pay and the promise of a better life for your family at home. For example, a trucker in neighboring Indonesia earns around 300 Singapore dollars a month, whereas a trucker in Singapore can easily earn $ 1500 a month or more. With such a large disparity in pay, the "

So in general getting a job regardless of the type of job is highly competitive and therefore it is not easy to get a job in Singapore.

As for whether it is more difficult to get a job in Singapore, especially if one is not a public relations or citizen. It really depends on several factors:
1. Is it a white-collar or blue-collar job?
2. What industry is it?
3. Are you from a "preferred country"?

The introduction of the Fair Consideration Framework has increased the cost of administration for companies to hire non-residents, but does not increase the cost for applicants. Furthermore, the framework does not limit the number of non-residents working in the company, nor does it have a "residents first / Singapore first" requirement. Don't talk to me about the number of hurdles one will have to overcome when applying for a job in the US, the EU, or even Australia. So I definitely agree that it might be a bit more difficult now with the FCF, but it is not significantly more difficult, nor is it relatively more difficult compared to other countries.

That said, if you mean a "blue collar job" it is relatively more difficult for a non-resident to get one. Let me explain this to you in detail. Generally, there are 3 different types of work permits here in Singapore for non-residents: the employment pass, the S pass, and the work permit.

The employment pass is for foreign professionals who have a job offer in Singapore, work in a "white collar" manager / executive level job, earn more than 3.3 thousand months and have acceptable qualifications. The employment pass has no space and is open to all nationalities. So if you are looking for a "white collar" job, there are no institutional factors that will make it difficult for you to work here. (Of course, if you've lived here for some time and have a better country context, you'd have an advantage over an equally qualified applicant.)

However, if you are looking for a "blue collar" job that pays no less than $ 2,200, the company will most likely have to apply for an S-pass. For S-pass, there are fees and charges that the hiring company must meet. The fee for the S-pass holder is no more than 15% of total employees in the service industry and 20% for all other industries. The company also has to pay a tax of between $ 315 and $ 550 per month to keep it on the payroll. In other words, employers have reasons to prefer hiring a PR or citizen before considering non-resident employment. For some companies, even if they face a labor shortage, they cannot employ non-residents because they have reached their quota. So, if you are looking for a "blue collar" job

The industry also matters if it is a manual job that does not meet the S approval criteria and will require a work permit. There are sector specific rules for different sectors such as the construction, manufacturing, marine, process and service sectors. It's too much for me to go through all these industry-specific criteria, but coupled with the fee they will make it that much more difficult for a non-resident to work.

Nationality also matters. Generally, if you are from Malaysia, PRC, you are considered a preferred / traditional country of origin and face fewer barriers compared to other countries. If you are from India, it is not too bad either. Other countries that normally face less barriers are the list of non-traditional sources (NTS) which differs from one sector to another, but generally includes countries such as Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Thailand, Myanmar, the Philippines. North Asian home countries (NAS) such as Hong Kong, Macao, South Korea and Taiwan also face fewer restrictions. If you do not have a passport from any of the preferred countries, it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to obtain a work permit and your best option is to qualify for an S-Pass or, better yet, an employment pass.

I hope this verbal diarrhea answers your question about why it is so difficult to get a job in Singapore, especially if you are not a public relations or citizen. :) Cheerios

Thanks for A2A


I know many people who did that and are still working in Singapore.


I don't think it is illegal as mentioned in one of the answers as many times even in my organization we would prefer to interview people who are in Singapore on a tourist visa and looking for work as they are immediately available and, They are often set for lower pay, so it's a win-win situation for any employer and also good for the employee in the way they get a job.

One more point to clarify here, you don't have to apply for the Employment Pass (EP) / S Pass, your employer does. So you only have you

Keep reading

Thanks for A2A


I know many people who did that and are still working in Singapore.


I don't think it is illegal as mentioned in one of the answers as many times even in my organization we would prefer to interview people who are in Singapore on a tourist visa and looking for work as they are immediately available and, They are often set for lower pay, so it's a win-win situation for any employer and also good for the employee in the way they get a job.

One more point to clarify here, you don't have to apply for the Employment Pass (EP) / S Pass, your employer does. So you just have to provide your employer with the necessary documentation.

Another thing as mentioned in one of the answers you have to leave Singapore to get your employment visa: NO, you do not have to leave Singapore. You can reside in Singapore, your employer will present the employment visa after a few days (usually 3-5 business days) The Ministry of Manpower (MOM) will give its decision on your application. If your application is approved, an IPA (Approval in principle) letter is issued and you can start working.

Later you will have to go to MOM with your medical reports, scan your fingerprints and you will receive an EP card.

I really like the processes in Singapore, I think they are more efficient, really simple and fast compared to other countries. After moving from Singapore, I keep comparing things regarding Singapore and I keep missing myself more.

Please check jobdb and job street websites first for vacancies, note that most of the posts solicit people from Singapore, PR or Malaysia. So check how many opportunities are available for your position. Now you can decide whether going there will allow you to get a job.

If you don't have at least two years of prior experience, don't bother going there. They generally don't recruit foreign rookies. If you have experience and there are enough jobs available (for foreigners), you should go first. Most companies won't bother calling someone they can't interview ASAP.

Once you

Keep reading

Please check jobdb and job street websites first for vacancies, note that most of the posts solicit people from Singapore, PR or Malaysia. So check how many opportunities are available for your position. Now you can decide whether going there will allow you to get a job.

If you don't have at least two years of prior experience, don't bother going there. They generally don't recruit foreign rookies. If you have experience and there are enough jobs available (for foreigners), you should go first. Most companies won't bother calling someone they can't interview ASAP.

Once you are there, get a local mobile number and update your CV with your mobile phone number and Singapore address. Update your CV on the jobstreet and jobsdb sites. Look for jobs there and apply for at least 50 jobs per day. Your job is to look for work now, so make it a goal to achieve.

If you are lucky, you will receive calls in a week. Most of them from recruitment companies as most Singapore companies use them to get candidates listed in order. Attend interviews and perform well.

Beware of cheaters. There are people who ask you to pay some money to get a job. Never pay anyone. Genuine recruiters never ask for money.

You need at least $ 2000 per month stay unless you want to backpacker. The single room costs 600-700 $ if you can find them. If you prefer to stay in a hotel, then you need a lot of money. You can eat in the food courts, they are cheaper and you can also get very good food. Stay away from restaurants and pubs if you want to save money. It would be tempting, but your goal is to get a job first, you can celebrate later.

Good luck..

Unless you already have some connections, if you intend to come here without a job, get a place and find a job, you are at great risk.

According to Wikipedia, it seems that you can stay up to 90 days without a visa.

All these restrictions, mentioned or not, can somehow be fixed with enough money, although it is unlikely that any bank will allow you to deposit here without good reason (such as a local business owner, or a worker, etc.)

Also, given your current position, you will also have limited options unless you are willing to start from the bottom again; otherwise it will be limited to only more

Keep reading

Unless you already have some connections, if you intend to come here without a job, get a place and find a job, you are at great risk.

According to Wikipedia, it seems that you can stay up to 90 days without a visa.

All these restrictions, mentioned or not, can somehow be fixed with enough money, although it is unlikely that any bank will allow you to deposit here without good reason (such as a local business owner, or a worker, etc.)

Also, given your current position, you will also have limited options unless you are willing to start at the bottom again; otherwise you will be limited to only larger companies, which translates into a longer time to find your job as your choice is limited.

If you are one of those looking for manual labor as packers, it would be very easy. Almost all factories or industries with warehouses can use them, and this includes very small companies.

All the foreign workers I knew had to go through agents or through references (friend, relative, ex-company, etc., etc.).

I have not met or heard of anyone who has found a job successfully without any prior preparation, simply by coming here and starting to look for work.

YES, there could be, but it would be the minority and it is an unnecessary risk that you should not take.

Many of these foreign workers already have friends here, who guide or pull the strings for them, otherwise the remaining majorities are usually agents.

Unless you have some friends here, some contacts, maybe your company has some contacts in Singapore and is willing to help you. If you come here unprepared, without doing any homework, you are taking a great risk.

The only advantage on your side is that you have 90 days, instead of 30 days.

The best way is to contact an employment agency. Most of the time, the resume they send you goes directly to the hiring manager. Most recruitment companies monitor Internet sites. Both the website and the recruiting company work well.

However, the real concern is after you arrive. How do your skills, experience, and qualifications fit with the rest of the resume?

How do you behave during the fair interview among other interviewees?

The best way to get a job is to build trust with your employer.

The trust can be classified into 2 different types of trust.

Put it this way, in a romantic relationship cou

Keep reading

The best way is to contact an employment agency. Most of the time, the resume they send you goes directly to the hiring manager. Most recruitment companies monitor Internet sites. Both the website and the recruiting company work well.

However, the real concern is after you arrive. How do your skills, experience, and qualifications fit with the rest of the resume?

How do you behave during the fair interview among other interviewees?

The best way to get a job is to build trust with your employer.

The trust can be classified into 2 different types of trust.

Put this way, in the courtship of a romantic relationship, there are two factors: feelings and material. There is a group that only looks at the feelings, there is another group that only looks at the material, but fortunately both groups are in the minority. Most people look at both. The same goes for employment.

While many people focus on "how skilled am I, how experienced am I," many neglected "feelings." Why are they more likely to hire people who are dressed and outspoken? Because they create a pleasant experience.

People make decisions based on emotion and then justify them logically.

Sounds difficult? I'm not really a pm, I'll show you the way.

When everyone does the same thing and you do it differently, they can't compare you to them and you won the battle.

On more than one occasion I have won the competition where other candidates are more qualified in skills and experience.

Not just me, I have helped several friends to get a job. Most of your interview takes hours because it is so engaging and goes beyond a cursory question and answer with a memorized model interview answer.

There is a list of most job portals for job seekers.

1. Bayt.com - The Middle East's Leading Job Site
Recruitment and career resources for job seekers, employers, and job placement consultants in the Middle East and North Africa.

2. Monster Gulf - The International Job Portal
Monster Gulf is the company's branch in the Gulf region. You have some of the best features available to you as a job seeker, and you have some great career opportunities with Monster Gulf.

3. Gulf Talent - Jobs in Dubai and the Middle East
GulfTalent is the leading job site for professionals in the Middle East and the Gulf region.

4. Na

Keep reading

There is a list of most job portals for job seekers.

1. Bayt.com - The Middle East's Leading Job Site
Recruitment and career resources for job seekers, employers, and job placement consultants in the Middle East and North Africa.

2. Monster Gulf - The International Job Portal
Monster Gulf is the company's branch in the Gulf region. You have some of the best features available to you as a job seeker, and you have some great career opportunities with Monster Gulf.

3. Gulf Talent - Jobs in Dubai and the Middle East
GulfTalent is the leading job site for professionals in the Middle East and the Gulf region.

4. Naukri Gulf - Dubai Job Portal Sites
Register for free and apply for Dubai vacancies from the best companies. Submit your resume and be selected.

5. Dubizzle - Dubai's
Leading Job Sites Dubizzle.com is the leading classified ads website for users in the Middle East and North Africa. Since its launch in 2005, dubizzle.com has become the number one platform for users to buy, sell or find anything in their community.

6. CareerJet Dubai - Jobs in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
Careerjet is a job search engine. In a single search, access 42,151,211 jobs published on 30,063 websites around the world

7. Khaleej Times - Dubai-based job portal
Khaleej Times Online offers comprehensive news coverage of the UAE and online services such as Dubai Gold Rate, Dubai draft rate, and Jobs in Dubai, UAE.

8. GN Careers - Jobs, Recruitment and Employment in Dubai
GNcareers.com is the UAE's premium recruitment portal for job seekers and employers. Find the job you've been looking for or browse through a comprehensive CV database for your company's hiring needs. Access the best job opportunities, career news and advice, employment law updates, and more.

9. Careers in eFinancial: Jobs in Banking and Finance in the Middle East
The best job sites for careers in banking and finance in the Middle East.

10. In fact: a search. All jobs.
11. AuthorityJob.com - Jobs, recruitment and employment services in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Authorityjob.com is a new name in the UAE online job search websites. This website updates new jobs, news, articles about jobs in Dubai. Authority Job also recruits job applicants directly from the UAE Employer Website and provides some value-added services including CV writing, LinkedIn profile optimization, Skype interview call, etc.

12. Wazifa.ae - UAE's growing Wazifa.ae job portal
offers daily job postings updates across all job categories. Job seekers can search for jobs by applying different types of filters. Jobs by Companies is also present on this website. The candidates section on wazifa helps job seekers quickly land on the employer interview table. CV writing services and job search tips are other benefits of this website.

13. MEP Job Gulf - HVAC, Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing Jobs in Gulf
MEP Job Gulf is a premier portal focused on providing expert recruitment services to candidates and clients in the MEP industry.

14. Dubai City Company - Add your resume for free to top recruitment companies in UAE.
Millions of job seekers come to the Middle East hoping to find lucrative employment! With Dubai City Company, you can add your resume for free to top recruitment companies in UAE. We are working with the best companies in the Middle East market such as Bayt.com, CareerJet, Recruiter and many more. Add your resume 100% free and register your details with the fastest growing company on Linkedin.

Thanks for the A2A.

He worked in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, for a large shipping company. I was also planning to leave Malaysia as the general security was not that good and my children's education was poor. Good schools were beyond my financial capacity.

My friend who was working in Singapore informed me of a vacancy at his company when he was leaving and I was selected after an interview and a written test. Upon receiving my confirmation letter from the Singapore company, I resigned from my KL company and had a notice period of 3 months. A few weeks before my actual transfer, we came to Singapore.

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.

He worked in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, for a large shipping company. I was also planning to leave Malaysia as the general security was not that good and my children's education was poor. Good schools were beyond my financial capacity.

My friend who was working in Singapore informed me of a vacancy at his company when he was leaving and I was selected after an interview and a written test. Upon receiving my confirmation letter from the Singapore company, I resigned from my KL company and had a notice period of 3 months. A few weeks before my actual transfer, we came to Singapore to check that some houses were our home. We select one and then switch from KL to Singapore, lock, stock, and barrel sometime in mid-2012.

So far the experience has been amazing. The feeling of security has been a great comforting factor for my family and obviously for me. My children were admitted to the local school (thank goodness!) And they did well. I have switched to my fourth company. I also completed my MBA (online) and it opened my mind to countless possibilities. My wife has started to pursue her passions and to teach our children.

Overall, I feel that Singapore has provided us with opportunities to add value to our lives and in return we are doing our best to give back to the country as much as we can.

You can apply in the same way that you do in other places. Go to the company's website / job portal and submit your CV.

You can also use the agency's services to help you find the right employer.

Once your employer agrees to hire you, they will apply for a work visa. Once your work visa is approved, you must go for a medical check-up, and later, if there is no problem, you can start working!

Good luck.

Congratulations on achieving public relations status.

From Singpass FAQ:

I was a holder of a work pass and I just obtained PR (Permanent Resident) status. How can I change my SingPass ID from my FIN to my new NRIC?
As your FIN (existing SingPass ID) will be deactivated in the SingPass system, you will need to register for a new SingPass account using your new NRIC.

SingPass - Frequently Asked Questions >> SingPass Account http://www.ifaq.gov.sg/SINGPASS/apps/fcd_faqmain.aspx?FAQ=130422

Now get citizenship. :P

Continue with Quora + Unlock this answer and support creators like Robert Sim by joining Quora + Start your free trialLearn more

Techni search consultancy sending candidates since 1995

Diploma or engineering degree, such as civil, mechanical, ECE, EEE and biotechnology, is located in chennai T nagar pinjaliya subramian street

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.