What are the best summer jobs for high school students?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Luke Phillips



What are the best summer jobs for high school students?

First of all I will give advice on the job market and future career. When you apply for a job, people want you to be interested in the subject. So a journalist will be asked for experience, even at 16 years old. So write a blog or a school magazine.

One really important skill that everyone should learn is selling. Anyone can get a job in direct sales like Amway or Avon. If you can earn any income from this route, you will have learned a lot about organization, orientation, and what people are like. You'll learn equally good lessons if you don't earn an income.

I would recommend everyone to try their own business. It is relatively easy to set up a sales site on the Internet. Or electronic commerce. This gives insight into markets, retail, and advertising. Putting CEO on your CV is impressive.
In high school you have nothing to lose.

Writing apps is a must for any geek.

Any job, even flipping burgers, will teach you something. Something about mingling with people you wouldn't otherwise mingle with. The discipline of punctuality, obeying rules that may seem silly. Bringing out things that are awful and winning can involve compromises. Having income and managing money is a skill few people really master.

If you need the money, that solves it. Take the job.

If you go to a really horrible school and need some academic training, then a summer class is very appropriate. Take the course.

But my first thought was to answer the question in a more experimental way, if that makes sense. You go to school for nine months and you probably spend what you could learn from that kind of structure. Summer jobs are often valuable because they throw you into situations that you won't experience otherwise.

When you look back, you will remember the unique characteristics of what you did, the new people who

Keep reading

If you need the money, that solves it. Take the job.

If you go to a really horrible school and need some academic training, then a summer class is very appropriate. Take the course.

But my first thought was to answer the question in a more experimental way, if that makes sense. You go to school for nine months and you probably spend what you could learn from that kind of structure. Summer jobs are often valuable because they throw you into situations that you won't experience otherwise.

When you look back, you will remember the unique characteristics of what you did, the new people you met, the responsibilities you had to deal with, the strange things you experienced.

So I don't see summer work primarily as a matter of money, work ethic, preparing to be an adult, and the like. I see it as a catalyst for emotional maturation.

Keep in mind that many countries have decided on a five-day work week. Are the other two days wasted? No, that's when he regains his strength so that he can charge for the five business days).

This bogus discussion is a window into the soul of K-12. They don't teach things well to begin with. So they need an excuse for their continued bad pedagogy. Anything but make an upgrade!)

Everything you can get to earn money and start learning how to be an independent adult before leaving school.

Cleaner, store worker, gardener, babysitter, fast food worker ... whatever ... an unpaid internship for a career is all well and good, but having to show up even when you really don't want to and it's not because of your CV but because he got engaged and wants to get paid ... well, that's the experience that will help him transition from school to next more than anything else he does.

And they pay you. If you can do something that can help you make a decision about what to do

Keep reading

Everything you can get to earn money and start learning how to be an independent adult before leaving school.

Cleaner, store worker, gardener, babysitter, fast food worker ... whatever ... an unpaid internship for a career is all well and good, but having to show up even when you really don't want to and it's not because of your CV but because he got engaged and wants to get paid ... well, that's the experience that will help him transition from school to next more than anything else he does.

And they pay you. If you manage to do something that can help you make a decision about what to do next in a career or college subject ... well that's great ... but honestly, it will probably be as a volunteer.

What's important about most early jobs is that you can meet people you might not otherwise know and find out how work and life work. One of my first jobs was working in a large distribution warehouse for a large pharmacy when I was 15 years old… The company treated me well, but I was very surprised when one day there was a kind of closure and everyone registered us. Two people were fired that day for stealing… they were stealing damaged products that needed to be thrown away. He was outraged because why should damaged things go to waste if someone needs them? Someone I worked with pointed out that this is because some people will deliberately damage things to get free stuff if a company has this policy. Someone else, who I thought had nothing bad to say about anyone,

When you've just finished high school and you mean getting a job at the local grocery store or your Home Depot, it's not too difficult as long as you have a pulse and a working brain.

They just want to know if you are a human being who can do the job, not argue, and be in tune with the culture. In fact, these are the kind of jobs where you can apply online and come straight to the store, do the interview, and often the same day if you are hired, you will either start immediately or take a drug test.

Looking back, I think a year of any kind of retail experience at that age would have

Keep reading

When you've just finished high school and you mean getting a job at the local grocery store or your Home Depot, it's not too difficult as long as you have a pulse and a working brain.

They just want to know if you are a human being who can do the job, not argue, and be in tune with the culture. In fact, these are the kind of jobs where you can apply online and come straight to the store, do the interview, and often the same day if you are hired, you will either start immediately or take a drug test.

Looking back, I think it would have been nice to have a year of any kind of retail experience at that age, no matter how bad the job might suck. It teaches you basic responsibility and how to work a typical 9-5 schedule. But a boss of mine told me earlier that you don't want to be stuck in that retail world forever, or in low-level IT support jobs.

Now if you want to skip all of that and do something more complicated, you can already start acquiring different skills that would make you employable or that you can use to work on your own side business.

With places like Udemy and Coursera, there are all sorts of different skills that you can start learning about and see if you're passionate about them. From marketing to project management to scheduling, it's good to try a few of these things before deciding to go to college and major in something.

The basic idea from there is to work on your portfolio, post it all on a real website, volunteer, and start landing your own clients, and then use that as the experience you need to be able to get other jobs.

Choose your option. I'd even consider becoming a virtual assistant if you can at your age. Some friends of mine said it's one of those jobs where you can gain some really valuable customer service style skills that will come in handy later for other aspects of your career, and you can even work from home too!

This way, you can start earning a little income as you begin your college career and pursue internships and club activities to further strengthen your budding resume. If that doesn't interest you as much, as others said in the comments, there are other ways to earn money and get a job even with little experience at that age.

Someone was even raised as a pet sitter, and these days, I've also had friends of mine who recommended this site called Rover to me if you wanted to get in. Apparently, it's a nice, relaxing type of job where you can walk dogs, take care of them, and still have time to do other things in your life. Hopefully this will help you!

Speaking of someone who is currently an active HS and has been for two years, yes.

Having a job is the most rewarding experience anyone can have, especially if you work in a restaurant like me. Coming home and knowing you killed that turn is a nice feeling. It doesn't hurt that I earn up to $ 30 an hour in tips.

If you are someone who pays for your own college, then you NEED a summer job. I usually work full time in the summer so I can earn 10k a year to save for a future year of college. Don't forget about gas, insurance, and also buying a car.

Even if you don't have to pay in

Keep reading

Speaking of someone who is currently an active HS and has been for two years, yes.

Having a job is the most rewarding experience anyone can have, especially if you work in a restaurant like me. Coming home and knowing you killed that turn is a nice feeling. It doesn't hurt that I earn up to $ 30 an hour in tips.

If you are someone who pays for your own college, then you NEED a summer job. I usually work full time in the summer so I can earn 10k a year to save for a future year of college. Don't forget about gas, insurance, and also buying a car.

Even if you don't have to pay for insurance or a car, once you get your license, you will pay a lot more than before because your parents won't be with you while you shop for food or pick something up. on target. Someone will have to pay for it and it won't be them.

As much as it sucks to feel like work takes away your summer, it presents you with the real world. It's best to be taught while you're still at your parents' house so that by the time you go to the real world, you've already done your fair share of shit and learned enough lessons that shit isn't so bad. because trust me, shit is inevitable; The question is when and how bad.

Don't feel like you also have to start full time, or even have to start full time. If all you want is a shift or two a week, go for it, but nevertheless, I highly recommend at least one a week to get the experience of a job.

Your eyes are closed. You have many options here.

First, know that your employers will seek the best for the company, that is your job. Not that they don't care about you, but the company has been around before you and will continue to exist after you and the management team must think that way to survive.

You also need to think like this. Except your obligation is to you.

I worked while going to school and I quit because of it. $ 6.70 an hour was worth a lot more my time than school, or so I thought.

You will have another 45 years (minimum) to earn months.

Keep reading

Your eyes are closed. You have many options here.

First, know that your employers will seek the best for the company, that is your job. Not that they don't care about you, but the company has been around before you and will continue to exist after you and the management team must think that way to survive.

You also need to think like this. Except your obligation is to you.

I worked while going to school and I quit because of it. $ 6.70 an hour was worth a lot more my time than school, or so I thought.

You will have another 45 years (at least) to make money and it is not as important as you think. You have a unique opportunity in high school to spend time doing what you want to do. Find out what you like to do and find out how to make a career out of it.

If you wait until you're an adult to start exploring these options, you may be stuck in a dead-end job (like working in a kennel) for most of your life. I have friends from high school who are still working as cashiers and fast food restaurants 10 years later. In high school, they got comfortable and decided that immediate money was more important than their future, and now they make less money than everyone I know.

Let. Get a different job. See if your school offers co-op. Stop thinking about the health of someone else's business while your (mental) health is suffering. And never suffer for more than your salary is worth.

Teaching at summer camp was fun.

If you're a junior or senior, you might consider internship opportunities so you can get your foot in the door. Law, medical and teaching schools are the only careers that seem to escape this requirement during summers (they tend to integrate these internships as part of the curriculum, for example in student teaching). Engineering and accounting do too. So if you're a liberal arts or humanities student, you might consider career opportunities (or do something in your spare time that can improve your level of experience and resume). It could stink of gra

Keep reading

Teaching at summer camp was fun.

If you're a junior or senior, you might consider internship opportunities so you can get your foot in the door. Law, medical and teaching schools are the only careers that seem to escape this requirement during summers (they tend to integrate these internships as part of the curriculum, for example in student teaching). Engineering and accounting do too. So if you're a liberal arts or humanities student, you might consider career opportunities (or do something in your spare time that can improve your level of experience and resume). It could suck graduating with $ 40,000 to $ 80,000 in debt, but no work experience.

I have to be clear, even if you want to pursue a career in teaching, engineering, accounting, law, or medicine, it will probably help to have that kind of experience on your resume and open your eyes to the industry and its ups and downs. If possible, wet your toe with your specialty, which should theoretically have passion. When graduation rolls around and you're looking for a job, you'll be happy to have a competitive edge over others who only have a diploma or otherwise haven't created a business card or portfolio from their experience.

P.S. If I were to wait tables ... I would focus on a work culture, a location (that is, semi-ideal), and a restaurant that had reasonably high prices (that is, that their% of net pay was decent).

I was a camp counselor for all of high school.

I would recommend it for a few reasons:

  • Normal 40-hour weeks with weekends off. Unless you work a night camp.
  • Serious responsibility in dealing with other people's children.
  • Learning to teach. Be it a sport or a game or just how to be kind and fair. This is a very meaningful experience.
  • Learn to be a role model and a leader
  • Learn to deal with stressful situations, like when one of your children breaks something in a museum.
  • You get to spend a lot of time outdoors sunbathing and being active.
  • Work 40 hours consistently and have ads
Keep reading

I was a camp counselor for all of high school.

I would recommend it for a few reasons:

  • Normal 40-hour weeks with weekends off. Unless you work a night camp.
  • Serious responsibility in dealing with other people's children.
  • Learning to teach. Be it a sport or a game or just how to be kind and fair. This is a very meaningful experience.
  • Learn to be a role model and a leader
  • Learn to deal with stressful situations, like when one of your children breaks something in a museum.
  • You get to spend a lot of time outdoors sunbathing and being active.
  • Working 40 hours consistently and having a decent salary means that you actually earn quite a bit of money compared to your friends who wait tables.
  • Play card games and Legos all day.

It doesn't matter as long as you can be responsible, get the job done, and learn something from the job. These are all valuable experiences that add to your growth curve. My 13 year old aired patios in our subdivision one weekend. Then he came back and offered to fertilize the lots if they bought the fertilizer. Once this was done, he began to grow the grass and sold them his premium lawn mowing service. Today, he owns his own recruiting business, never understands, and has a waiting list of clients who pay for his premium renovation skills. I definitely learned some lessons that I would say

Keep reading

It doesn't matter as long as you can be responsible, get the job done, and learn something from the job. These are all valuable experiences that add to your growth curve. My 13 year old aired patios in our subdivision one weekend. Then he came back and offered to fertilize the lots if they bought the fertilizer. Once this was done, he began to grow the grass and sold them his premium lawn mowing service. Today, he owns his own recruiting business, never understands, and has a waiting list of clients who pay for his premium renovation skills. Definitely, I learned some lessons that I would say.

People will pay a person to write the content of the audio or the words in a conversation. More information here. A Flexible Job You Can Work From Home - Earn $ 25 per hour as a transcriptionist. I signed up for Rev and the advance typing test is not difficult. Regardless, typists have an average typing speed of 40 words per minute. A great typing test is here TypingTest.com - test your typing speed in 60 seconds.

All the best.

Someone recently posted copy paste jobs that are useful in online jobs quota, but all jobs are not real, some are fake ... so be careful, don't put money on that ... don't trust that all online jobs are mostly fake ...

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.