What are the best questions to ask a potential employer in a job interview?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Yandel Sanford



What are the best questions to ask a potential employer in a job interview?

If you've watched enough interview preparation videos, then you know that you should always end your job interviews with a few questions of your own.

For one thing, it's the best for you. Asking specific questions will help you know early on if this job is truly a good fit for your career goals. Similarly, asking questions shows the interviewer that you are prepared and that you are serious about the position for which you are applying.

That said, sometimes asking the right questions can be more difficult than you think. That is why I prepared this list of general post-interview questions that can

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If you've watched enough interview preparation videos, then you know that you should always end your job interviews with a few questions of your own.

For one thing, it's the best for you. Asking specific questions will help you know early on if this job is truly a good fit for your career goals. Similarly, asking questions shows the interviewer that you are prepared and that you are serious about the position for which you are applying.

That said, sometimes asking the right questions can be more difficult than you think. That's why I put together this list of general post-interview questions that you can use, in addition to the more specific questions that come to mind.

* First round interview questions

Therefore, the first few questions work best for the first round of interviews. They will help you get an idea of ​​the company culture and some job details that are not covered in the original job posting. First of all:

"What were the factors that encouraged you to join this company?"

This question is designed to help you better connect with the interviewer and give you new insights about the company.

"Do you have any questions or concerns about my grades?"

This question makes you look confident and is an opportunity for you to learn about any concerns the interviewer may have about you that might make them think twice before inviting them to the second round, concerns that you now have an opportunity to address head-on. .

* Questions from the second round of the interview

So, assuming you've made it past the first round interview, these second round interview questions will give you a better idea of ​​how your role and relationship with your future boss will be managed.

"How does management measure employee growth and success?"

The answer you get here will tell you how you will be evaluated on the job.

"What are the projects that I will be working on during the first 30, 60 and 90 days of work?"

The answer you get here will give you an idea of ​​the type of work you will do and the expectations that go with it. Next:

* Final round interview questions

Finally, once you get to the final round of interviews, you know they think you can get the job done, but do YOU ​​want to work for THEM? The questions to ask here are more about culture or environment. For example, a question could be:

"What kind of employee does well here?"

The answer you get here will help you understand the types of people the company hires, maintains, and promotes.

"Can you tell me about the team I'll be working with?"

This one is pretty straightforward, as it will give you some early ideas on who you will be working with on a daily basis and the best way to sync with them.

In general, treat your interviews more like a conversation in which both parties learn more about each other. Coming to your interviews with this mindset will reduce your nerves and help you focus on doing your best.

If you are really interested in the company and the position, you need to ask questions that really help you understand what your life would be like if you worked there, and more importantly, how it could be different from your current life.

Maybe it's a recruiting annoyance that I've picked up on over the years, but I have a hard time accepting a candidate who doesn't seem to be thinking of things that way. If you accept a new job, your life will almost certainly be different from what it is today.

  • Ask for people: depending on how many people you have met, surely you have done observatio
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If you are really interested in the company and the position, you need to ask questions that really help you understand what your life would be like if you worked there, and more importantly, how it could be different from your current life.

Maybe it's a recruiting annoyance that I've picked up on over the years, but I have a hard time accepting a candidate who doesn't seem to be thinking of things that way. If you accept a new job, your life will almost certainly be different from what it is today.

  • Ask about people: depending on how many people you have met, you have surely made observations / assumptions about them. Ask your interviewer about these people. What has been your experience working with them? Who do you work most closely with? Who are the people to turn to on the team? Why? The answers to these questions will tell you a lot about some of the more subtle dynamics in the office and allow you to really think about being part of the team.
  • Ask about the product - Depending on the product (or service) this company offers, all of these people are likely to have a consistent perspective of the 'company line', but if you dig a little deeper with each individual, you will likely find answers that resonate much more. to yours. Ask them how they perceived the product before joining and how they perceive it now. Ask what the challenges are in influencing product direction (especially if you are an engineer or have a role close to the product). Ask if you are expected to influence the direction of the product if that is not your primary role. In general, any information you may obtain beyond what you have read in the press or on the company website will be valuable information to help inform your decision.
  • Ask About Impact - This has become a buzzword that many companies are using to attract new employees, so again it's about separating the party line and discussing it with an individual. If you ask someone for an example of how someone has really made an impact, it is interesting to see if they choose an example from someone else rather than something they have actually done. Of course, if you ask 3 people this and they all give you the same example, it is most likely more of a party line example.


There are many more questions that could be added to this list (especially about long-term career growth, etc.), but it really depends on what you are looking for and what type of job it is. My best advice is to ask them questions that show them how hard you are trying to understand what your life would be like in this position, in this company, and how you can really be successful.

If you do it right, the company will have a better opinion of you, but more importantly, it will have the right information to make an informed decision about whether it is right for you.

You have reached the last 5 to 10 minutes of the job interview and the interviewer says "Do you have any questions for me?" If you say no, you are missing the easiest way to make an unforgettable impression. You want to be unforgettable right?

An interview is about connecting with people, the company, the job, and you. You absolutely should ask questions at the end of the interview, but some questions are better than others.

Impact - Ask how it will have an impact here. Companies want to hire those who want to own the problems, not cause them or walk away. Get excited about it

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You have reached the last 5 to 10 minutes of the job interview and the interviewer says "Do you have any questions for me?" If you say no, you are missing the easiest way to make an unforgettable impression. You want to be unforgettable right?

An interview is about connecting with people, the company, the job, and you. You absolutely should ask questions at the end of the interview, but some questions are better than others.

Impact - Ask how it will have an impact here. Companies want to hire those who want to own the problems, not cause them or walk away. Go ahead and solve their problems and they will not be able to resist at least considering you and the ideas you can contribute.

Growth: Visualize yourself in the company and, more importantly, have the interviewer visualize you in the company. Managers want to hire people who will grow, not back down, so demonstrate the ability to do so. Identify areas of opportunity that you will continue to work on, but also trust your strengths enough to show them front and center. Don't forget to be humble.

Your experience: people like to talk about themselves. Find out why your interviewer joined the company and not others, why this team, and what their career path has been like. Make your interviewer open up about himself and state what matters to him.

People - Learn what the team composition looks like, what their background is, why they joined, what motivates them to do this job every day, and if you have a chance to network with a current employee using this question, bonus points for you .

The plan for the next X years: ask questions about the future and include yourself in the question. “This sounds like a great opportunity and I am happy that I was able to chat. What will the next 2-3 years be like? What are the goals? "Companies want to know that you are involved in the long term. Not only because it is very expensive to replace, but hiring and recruiting is difficult. Especially hiring good and talented people. If you are one of those people, companies will do their best to keep you. and others will do their best to woo you.You want to be that person.

What does an ideal candidate for this position look like? - This is one of my favorite questions because it helps you position yourself as the right employee, IF you do it right. When you ask this, the interviewer will likely go over what is important to have or know for this position, and here's a pro tip: the things they say first are probably the most important (most of the time). If you hear something that you do not have, now you have the opportunity to give an answer on how you will learn it. If they mention something that you do have, it's a great opportunity to remind them that you are skilled in that area.

Can I tell you more about me? - This is a great question to give your interviewer a chance to ask you directly and frankly about any concerns you may have. This gives you the opportunity to address those concerns.

Mission: Align with the mission of the company by telling a story. For example, I joined Facebook before other big tech companies because I felt personally connected to the mission. My mom uses almost all Facebook products to stay connected with family and long distance friends. Why does this matter to me? She is also my dad's main caregiver and without Facebook, she would find it difficult to connect, smile, and most importantly find happiness thanks to family.

Asking all of these questions is a surefire way to help others think about you more, but as Andy mentioned, it will also help you know if the opportunity is right for you.

I have a list of questions to ask at the end of the interview. Here you see them. Asking them not only shows your interest, it also helps you see their reactions, and their responses help you understand if this job and these people are right for you. Don't forget N7 and N8.


  • N1. What skills and experiences should an ideal candidate have? This way you would know if you are the one for them or not. Don't be afraid if you don't have them, it just means it's not the right job for you.
  • N2. What have you enjoyed the most about working here? Give them the opportunity to speak ab
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I have a list of questions to ask at the end of the interview. Here you see them. Asking them not only shows your interest, it also helps you see their reactions, and their responses help you understand if this job and these people are right for you. Don't forget N7 and N8.


  • N1. What skills and experiences should an ideal candidate have? This way you would know if you are the one for them or not. Don't be afraid if you don't have them, it just means it's not the right job for you.
  • N2. What have you enjoyed the most about working here? Give them a chance to talk about themselves. It gives them a good feeling to be able to talk about their experiences and it is an opportunity for you to find the interesting parts of the job.
  • N3. Can you tell me about the team I work with? Ask about their background, field of study, etc. Show your interest in the people you spend 9 hours a day with (at least).
  • N4. How will I train?
  • N5. What is the review process? How will my performance be evaluated?
  • N6. What do you hope the first 30, 60 and 90 months will accomplish? It is a very crucial question.
  • N7. Do you have doubts as to whether I am the right candidate for this job? This question needs you to be brave, but it is very valuable. The first time I asked, I found out where I had had incorrect estimates and did not repeat those errors in my next interview. Ask this question, no matter how scared you are of the answer. If they doubt something you already have, you can discuss it with them, and if something is missing, you know where you need to improve.
  • N8. Can you give me a comment on this interview? You may never see this person again, but remember that you are a professional and you interview a lot of people. So take this opportunity to ask them about their performance and use it to learn something new and to improve.

And last but not least, take advantage of the interview as a great opportunity to learn something, about yourself, about current techniques, about companies, about products, etc.

When I got my first job after graduate school, I asked my interviewers what made them choose me among the other candidates. His response: “The questions you asked. You asked such good questions that they showed us not only how informed you were, but also how much you cared about the population you would be serving in this role. "

So what kinds of questions should you ask? There are six categories of questions to ask in the interview (because the interview is a two-way street!):

  1. Questions you must have answered to determine fit / questions related to the culture of the organization. For examination
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When I got my first job after graduate school, I asked my interviewers what made them choose me among the other candidates. His response: “The questions you asked. You asked such good questions that they showed us not only how informed you were, but also how much you cared about the population you would be serving in this role. "

So what kinds of questions should you ask? There are six categories of questions to ask in the interview (because the interview is a two-way street!):

  1. Questions you must have answered to determine fit / questions related to the culture of the organization. For example, "How do you encourage an employee's connection to the organization?", "How do you motivate your employees?" Or even "Do employees usually have lunch together or at their desks?" (This one will tell you a lot about company culture!).
  2. Questions that come up in your research about the company. This will be company specific and show your genuine interest in the company. Also, don't be afraid to ask tough questions, especially if they show your ethics. For example, in my interview, I wanted to know how one of the practices that I would have to do at work did not directly violate a federal law common to that industry. Once they explained to me how they could legally carry out the practice without breaking the law, I had a better understanding of the policy. I think this was also the question that impressed them the most.
  3. Questions to determine future advancement opportunities. For example, "What opportunities are there to advance?" This shows that you are interested enough in the company that you want to stay long-term.
  4. Questions to determine your hiring schedule. (Okay, these questions are just for you and your own sanity.) When candidates go to interviews and then hear nothing at all, they freak out. Yes, it is stressful and also rude for the company to keep you hanging. So before you leave the interview, ask when they plan to make a hiring decision and if they will inform each of the interviewees of the results, or only the one who is offered the job. That way, you won't waste your time and energy worrying about what they decided.

This is where it gets good!

These last two types of questions to ask are the best to help you win the interview!

5. Questions to show your initiative and help you visualize it at work. For example, "What results would you like to see from me in the first 90 days of the job?", "What will be the first projects I will work on once hired?" Or “When we sit down to discuss my performance a year from now, what will success look like?” The way these questions are worded helps them imagine YOU as the person at work.

6. Questions to express what they like about you. In the N. 5, it was about helping them visualize, now you have to get them to verbalize! You want them to convince you why they should hire you, which in turn will convince them to hire you (yes, that bachelor's degree I got in psychology is really paying off here!). For example, "What part of my resume catches your eye the most?" or "What made you choose to interview me out of all the other applicants?"

You should always have your own questions prepared for an interview because interviewing (as you can see) is a two-way street. When asked, "What questions do you have for us?" Your answer should never be "None". If so, you will surely lose your job to someone who shows more interest in the job with your questions.

This is republished from Lori Bumgarner's answer to What are some interview tricks? I am in a circulation job working as a sales officer. This month is the end of the financial year, so fundraising is important. I even let my manager know if a particular center is not paying the outstanding. If you are interested in more tips on how to win the interview, see the link to my on-demand programs on my Quora profile, where you will find the Steps to Accepting the Interview program.

I've been and have conducted hundreds of interviews in the last 10 years or so in HR. There are some good points you can take with you in an interview:

  • Remember: you are interviewing them too. Treat it like this. Be humble and kind, but cook them on the grill. You make a big impression in most places, and those places that aren't impressed by your detailed questions are places you probably don't want to work either.
  • Example 1: "FedEx Store looks like a great place. But OfficeMax and UPS Store seem to do the same thing. What sets FedEx apart from the competition? W
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I've been and have conducted hundreds of interviews in the last 10 years or so in HR. There are some good points you can take with you in an interview:

  • Remember: you are interviewing them too. Treat it like this. Be humble and kind, but cook them on the grill. You make a big impression in most places, and those places that aren't impressed by your detailed questions are places you probably don't want to work either.
  • Example 1: "FedEx Store seems like a great place. But OfficeMax and UPS Store seem to do the same thing. What sets FedEx apart from the competition? What does it do differently?" You can package the same question with, say, Applebees, BP, UBS, Lloyds, GM, and Google. It works everywhere.
  • Example 2: Talk about FINANCIAL. Look. The goal of the interview is to make you look MEMORABLE. Nothing seems more memorable than candidates who do their homework and can talk about the company they want to work for. Study a little. Ask them about their financial activity in recent years. NEVER CRITIZES. Ask them how they have been able to successfully do XYZ or ZYX or "navigate this financial crisis." What. You only have the ability to speak about your business.
  • Here's my top secret "decisive" question that always gets your attention (and I mean ALWAYS, since I've gotten calls about this question and the people I give it to ALWAYS come back and say, "Shit, they were totally stunned by this one! "). . . are you ready? Well. "I'll be honest. Astra-Zeneca seems like a dream come true, but I have to acknowledge something. I am human. I want to let you know right now that at some point in the future, I am going to make a mistake or two. It's how I keep growing and Frankly, it's how I've gotten to where I am today. This may sound crazy, but I want to know how Astra-Zeneca works with its team members / managers / employees / leaders / executives to incorporate their mistakes into a continuous growth process. without feeling like a failure. I've worked for companies before that just let it go and they don't care. I have worked for a few who exaggerate every little challenge. I want you to know that I own who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? "I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What does Astra-Zeneca do to keep me growing?" I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make the occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? " I want you to know that I own who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? "I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What does Astra-Zeneca do to keep me growing?" I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make the occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? " I want you to know that I own who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? "I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What does Astra-Zeneca do to keep me growing?" I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make the occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? " What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? "I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What does Astra-Zeneca do to keep me growing?" What is Astra-Zeneca doing to keep it growing? "I want you to know that I take ownership of who I am and I like to know when I make an occasional mistake so that I can continually grow. What does Astra-Zeneca do to keep me growing?"


Here's the deal. HR managers and hiring managers f * king HATE BS. We know you are going to cheat us. It is part and package. But for the love of God, don't try to sell us on the shitty line that you're perfect. The best thing to do is ALWAYS be prepared with some "prepackaged" mistakes you have made and how they have grown you. And something even BETTER: you made a mistake that really took your breath away. You don't need to say how you turned it around. Know why? BECAUSE WE ALL FAIL. And sometimes we screw it up badly.

When I interview people, the "make or break" questions are ALWAYS the ones that never wait. I'm good at it, and frankly, it's what I do for a living, so don't pretend you're better than me at this because I do a hundred interviews a month. However, one way to show me how great you are is to do something that no one is willing to do: tell me how you screwed things up. The property of errors is the difference between a child and an adult. I'll give you two of my great interview "mistake" offers (maybe true, maybe embellished ... only your stylist will know for sure!):

  1. Dropping the ball completely: "Once when I was a manager at Filene's, I had to manage a full seasonal transition of the department. It was kind of complicated and it was my first year as a manager. I had a great plan. I scheduled my people. I calculated exactly. how long would it take to do a certain section and I KNEW exactly what time we would start and what time we would finish. Man, I was proud. And ... I totally screwed it up. Project got off track, I didn't have a "backup plan" for intrusions and distractions Worse yet, I lost my cool and yelled at people all day. I totally screwed up. " ¶ The interviewer asks, "Oh. What did you do about it?" ¶ Me, "Nothing. I gave up. I walked away angry and my manager had to come replace me. I wish I could say that I took the noble route. Looking back, I wish I could point out all the challenges I've had in my life and how I turned each of them into a huge success. But I was 23 years old. He was arrogant and out of my league. Was it a learning process? Oh yeah. I learned very quickly that despite my experience and education, I was not as good as I thought. But the project was only a success because I had a great manager who was able to step in and make it successful. I had to swallow my pride and watch him do what he should have been able to do and what I know now, years later, I can do quite easily now. "Was it a learning process? Oh yeah. I learned very quickly that despite From my experience and education, it wasn't as good as I thought. But the project was only a success because I had a great manager who was able to step in and make it successful. I had to swallow my pride and watch him do what he should have been able to do and what I know now, years later, I can do quite easily now. "Was it a learning process? Oh yeah. I learned very quickly that despite From my experience and education, it was not as good as I thought. But the project was only a success because I had a great manager who was able to step in and make it successful. I had to swallow my pride and watch him do what he should have been able to do and what which I know now, years later, I can do quite easily now. " Was it a learning process? Oh yeah. I learned very quickly that despite my experience and education, I was not as good as I thought. But the project was only a success because I had a great manager who was able to step in and make it successful. I had to swallow my pride and watch him do what he should have been able to do and what I know now, years later, I can do quite easily now. " Was it a learning process? Oh yeah. I learned very quickly that despite my experience and education, I was not as good as I thought. But the project was only a success because I had a great manager who was able to step in and make it successful. I had to swallow my pride and watch him do what he should have been able to do and what I know now, years later, I can do quite easily now. "
  2. Since our payroll is managed month to month, but we made schedules week to week, I was lucky to have made my mistake in the middle of the month. I looked forward to the following week's project schedule and was able to increase the project by a week (as well as the payroll dollars allocated for that project), and with a little finesse in scheduling, I was able to rework the associates for what they dedicated your "overtime" to finish the project. "¶" In the end, we ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. " but we did schedules week by week, I was lucky to have made my mistake in the middle of the month. I looked forward to the following week's project schedule and was able to increase the project by a week (as well as the payroll dollars allocated for that project), and with a little finesse in scheduling, I was able to rework the associates for what they dedicated your "overtime" to finish the project. "¶" In the end, we ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. "but we made schedules week by week, I was lucky to have made my mistake in the middle of the month. I looked forward to the following week's project schedule and was able to increase the project by a week (as well as the payroll dollars allocated for that project), and with a little finesse in scheduling, I was able to rework the associates for what they dedicated your "overtime" to finish the project. "¶" In the end, we ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. "I was lucky to have made my mistake in the middle of the month. I looked forward to the following week's project schedule and was able to increase the project by a week (as well as the payroll dollars allocated for that project), and with a little finesse in scheduling, I was able to rework the associates for what they dedicated your "overtime" to finish the project. "¶" In the end, we ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. "I was lucky to have made my mistake in the middle of the month. I looked forward to the following week's project schedule and was able to increase the project by a week (as well as the payroll dollars allocated for that project), and with a little finesse in scheduling, I was able to rework the associates for what they dedicated your "overtime" to finish the project. "¶" In the end, we ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. It's from the project schedule and I was able to scale up the project by one week (as well as the payroll dollars allocated for that project), and with a little finesse in scheduling, I was able to rework the associates to spend their "extra money" to finish the project. "¶" In the end, we ended up finishing the project a week early, and just a little bit, below budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. It's off the project schedule and I was able to increase the project by a week (as well as the payroll dollars allocated for that project), and with a little finesse in scheduling, I was able to rework associates to spend their "extra money" time. "in finishing the project". ¶ "In the end, we ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. "We ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I am proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes walking to get some fresh air solved a small payroll crisis. "We ended up finishing the project a week early and just slightly under budget. I wish I could say that every mistake in life turned out to be so fixable, but in this case, I'm proud to say that a calm mind and 30 minutes of walking for fresh air solved a minor payroll crisis. "


Side note, as much as I like the "error property" answers, of course, don't be afraid to talk about your successes, and for Vishun's sake, don't talk more than twice about your mistakes. On the one hand, it will end up sounding TOO rehearsed, and on the other, it will seem a bit casual about your mistakes in a way that makes you look like you're proud of them. On the contrary, you never want to be happy for them, just mature enough to recognize them.

Good luck.

  • May I ask why this position is open? The answer will indicate whether the person who previously held your job went to another job, was fired, or was promoted. This will give you a decent idea of ​​where you could be in a few years if you take the job.
  • What is the biggest challenge for this role? If you respond to your answer with how you can attack this challenge, you will seem like a better candidate.
  • How would you describe the culture of your company? If they don't know, it is a bad sign.
  • What is the most important project / task you are working on right now and how can I help you achieve your goals? Putting the f
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  • May I ask why this position is open? The answer will indicate whether the person who previously held your job went to another job, was fired, or was promoted. This will give you a decent idea of ​​where you could be in a few years if you take the job.
  • What is the biggest challenge for this role? If you respond to your answer with how you can attack this challenge, you will seem like a better candidate.
  • How would you describe the culture of your company? If they don't know, it is a bad sign.
  • What is the most important project / task you are working on right now and how can I help you achieve your goals? Putting the focus on the Hiring Manager will make him seem like a problem solver.
  • When do you plan to make a decision? This will usually give you a good idea if they plan to hire you (or someone) in the near future.
  • What is the best time / way to follow up with you? Get your preferred communication method so you don't look like a plague when you check in later.
  • Never ask about benefits, compensation, vacation time, schedules, it makes you seem greedy and disinterested in working for their company. They will usually mention it and if not, it will be included in an offer if you get one.

Interview Questions to Ask Employers: From Corissa Grace's Enternships Blog

"What are the top three qualities you would expect to find in the perfect candidate?"
Job descriptions can be disconcertingly long. This is your chance to distill the essentials of the waffle and get to the heart of the matter.

"Are there opportunities for training and professional development or for obtaining qualifications?"
You are a fervent self-improver. Nice move, Sherlock.

"Describe a typical work day at company XXX."
This is less a question of "oooh, look how clever I am" and more or

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Interview Questions to Ask Employers: From Corissa Grace's Enternships Blog

"What are the top three qualities you would expect to find in the perfect candidate?"
Job descriptions can be disconcertingly long. This is your chance to distill the essentials of the waffle and get to the heart of the matter.

"Are there opportunities for training and professional development or for obtaining qualifications?"
You are a fervent self-improver. Nice move, Sherlock.

"Describe a typical work day at company XXX."
This is less of a "oooh, look how crafty I am" question and more of a functional criterion so you can judge whether the company's work style suits your work style. It is also good to assess (subtly) if overtime is expected.

“Do you have any outstanding concerns about whether I am suitable for the role? I would love the chance to convince you otherwise. "
This is a double hit of questioning brilliance, because A) you are showing that you are bravely open to constructive criticism and B) giving yourself one last chance to allay their concerns.

" how soon can I start? "
Bolshy is like bolshy. You have to leave the impression that you really, REALLY want the damn job. Only if it really does, of course.

"When can I expect to hear from you?"
If you're not feeling cheeky enough to blow up with the question above, this is another way to emphasize that you're interested as a green bean.

CHOOSE AND MIX
"How would you describe your company culture?"
"What do you like about working here?"
"If you could change one thing about working here, what would it be?"
"Could you give me an example of a project you would be working on?"
“I am impressed by your company's work on FRUITS OF YOUR PREVIOUS RESEARCH. Please tell me more about ASPECT YOU SUSPECT MAY BE RELEVANT TO THE VACANT. "
" What are the opportunities for advancement within the company? "
" How is the structure of leadership / management? "
" What is your internal communication style? Face-to-face meetings or mainly via email? "
" What would success be like in this position? "
"Are there opportunities to travel?"
"Is this a new position? If not, could you tell me how the role of the previous employee developed? "

QUESTIONS TO AVOID

"So what exactly does your company do?"
There are no excuses; You should have a pretty good idea of ​​this long before the interview. Google is your friend. However, it's okay to ask questions to fill in any gaps left after you've done your research.

"What about vacations and free time?"
With most jobs, you will likely be expected to take no vacation for about three months or the length of your trial period. They may ask if you have any upcoming holidays that are already booked; If not, it is best to keep the schtum until the subject of the job offer comes up.

"Now, about the salary ..."
Yes, we know, money makes the world go round. The employer probably wants to pay as little as possible and you want to earn as much as possible. But, again, these negotiations will take place at the offer stage, not before.

I agree that you should put yourself in the mindset of being on the job already and use that to guide your questions. Ideally, you will be able to use specific information from the interviews to better tailor your questions, but at the bottom I always ask the following:

1. What characteristic (s) do you think the ideal candidate should have to be successful in this position?

This can reveal some behind-the-scenes issues that may not have come up before and opens up follow-up questions.

2. What must I accomplish within my first 90 days to validate that I have hired the right person for the job?

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I agree that you should put yourself in the mindset of being on the job already and use that to guide your questions. Ideally, you will be able to use specific information from the interviews to better tailor your questions, but at the bottom I always ask the following:

1. What characteristic (s) do you think the ideal candidate should have to be successful in this position?

This can reveal some behind-the-scenes issues that may not have come up before and opens up follow-up questions.

2. What must I accomplish within my first 90 days to validate that I have hired the right person for the job?

This ensures that the job description is accurate and that the hiring manager is not waiting for someone with completely different abilities than you possess, or worse yet, he is waiting for a superhero who doesn't really exist. You may also find that he / she is setting you up for failure from day one, or that the expectations for the position are worth more than what they end up offering, which can give you an edge in salary negotiations later on.

Combined, they make the interviewer think carefully about the important facets of the role and provide context for their expectations. They can also display some red flags. If the person presented the company to you as dynamic and fast-moving, but tells you that you will need patience to deal with bureaucracy and interdepartmental office politics, you need to dig deeper to discover the truth about the company.

Finally, once you're on the job, you know what to focus on to be successful from day one.

A job interview is a two-way street. The employer asks questions to determine if the interviewee is the ideal candidate for the job, and the smart candidate uses the interview to assess how they would fit in, if they could do their best work there, and how well they align their goals. they are with the employer.

Here are some questions the interviewee should ask before leaving:

  1. Tell me a little about what you are looking for in your candidate or new employee, tell me about the last one you hired or why the position is open.
  2. What do you think prevented the other person from being successful?
  3. W
Keep reading

A job interview is a two-way street. The employer asks questions to determine if the interviewee is the ideal candidate for the job, and the smart candidate uses the interview to assess how they would fit in, if they could do their best work there, and how well they align their goals. they are with the employer.

Here are some questions the interviewee should ask before leaving:

  1. Tell me a little about what you are looking for in your candidate or new employee, tell me about the last one you hired or why the position is open.
  2. What do you think prevented the other person from being successful?
  3. What are the tasks in this job that will really define this person's success?
  4. Which are the next steps?
  5. When will I hear from you?
  6. Do you have a reason why you wouldn't consider moving me through the (hiring) process?
  7. Are there other people who will interview me later?
  8. Will it be a panel interview?
  9. On a typical day, how many hours do you work on the road?
  10. How does the travel program work?
  11. With your clients, what do you think is the main obstacle to success?
  12. What do you see in the field with sales reps that prevents them from being successful?
  13. Which product line of yours is your main line? (i.e. the one everyone should buy)
  14. What product line should they probably not buy?
  15. What do you like about working here?
  16. Among the other candidates, how do I rank?
  17. Do you have any question for me?

Ask creative questions. Don't sound like just another candidate by following standard boring questions.

Don't ask boring questions like:

  • what is expected of you (I've heard candidates ask this question even before they are hired, it sounds silly to me). This is also too direct like, what is my KPI and could it be like evaluating yourself to match the KPIs?
  • When can you expect comments, etc.? (Yes, you can ask this question, but this is a standard question and leaves no impression on the interviewer of your creative abilities.) Feedback will be provided to you, or you can continue.
Keep reading

Ask creative questions. Don't sound like just another candidate by following standard boring questions.

Don't ask boring questions like:

  • what is expected of you (I've heard candidates ask this question even before they are hired, it sounds silly to me). This is also too direct like, what is my KPI and could it be like evaluating yourself to match the KPIs?
  • When can you expect comments, etc.? (Yes, you can ask this question, but this is a standard question and leaves no impression on the interviewer of your creative abilities.) Feedback will be provided to you or you can contact the recruiter / coordinator for the same. You should skip this question to attract the interviewer's attention.

So what can you ask? Get creative, ask a mix of quirky and clever questions.

Even if you are rejected for any reason, your review card will always be unique and labeled superior if you ask a few creative questions at the end of the interview. And don't overdo it by asking too many questions, keep it simple by asking 2/3 questions.

There is no perfect mantra here, speak up and ring some interesting bells while asking questions. Some of my question bank:

  • What is the only thing that stands out about your company's products / services?
  • How would the company culture define a stranger?
  • What are some of the best projects completed so far or work in progress? (This will certainly put the interviewer in a deep reflection point for a while)
  • What would be the career path for your position, how would you evaluate performance? (This will be interesting as you will see the interviewer summarize the story of their own experience here.)
  • Where would the company like to be in three years? (You can say you want to know the growth vision)

Tailor the relevant questions to your role or position for which you are interviewing, make your list, do some good research.

Keep in mind that sometimes the last impressions are the ones that are remembered, so the last impression you leave may be the best and the first impression is not always the best.

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