What are the best jobs for people with mild autism?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Monica Cooley



What are the best jobs for people with mild autism?

It really depends on the person. In general, jobs that require the least amount of interpersonal skills and social interaction tend to be better for people on the spectrum. Social skills are generally our weakest area of ​​functioning. Some people on the spectrum are good at computers, programming, and that sort of thing. However, that is not true for ALL people with autism, or even the majority. I can't understand the code at all. I have terrible logical reasoning skills and zero patience for coding. Many people stereotype autistics as good at this, even psychologists, to my surprise. My stren

Keep reading

It really depends on the person. In general, jobs that require the least amount of interpersonal skills and social interaction tend to be better for people on the spectrum. Social skills are generally our weakest area of ​​functioning. Some people on the spectrum are good at computers, programming, and that sort of thing. However, that is not true for ALL people with autism, or even the majority. I can't understand the code at all. I have terrible logical reasoning skills and zero patience for coding. Many people stereotype autistics as good at this, even psychologists, to my surprise. My strengths / ability to splinter is with verbal intelligence / vocabulary and to remember facts / trivia. The best jobs for me are office jobs or those where I can use my gift to find spelling and grammar errors. That's the kind of job I have now. Many people on the spectrum also perform better when their work is predictable and tasks are routine. We often have trouble adjusting when we don't know what to expect.

You need to explore your inner self by asking yourself what kinds of activities really excite you. There aren't even certain "mild autism" jobs specifically. The only key to the equation is your true feelings and sincere passions. It never hurts to try multiple jobs. Your passions can and will change over time with your maturity and life experiences, but your passions for life remain more stable. Autism is and should not be a limiting criterion as your question implies. Autism is not a disability, but your unique and profound gift. Use it as such. Never let anyone make you feel different. You can excel in

Keep reading

You need to explore your inner self by asking yourself what kinds of activities really excite you. There aren't even certain "mild autism" jobs specifically. The only key to the equation is your true feelings and sincere passions. It never hurts to try multiple jobs. Your passions can and will change over time with your maturity and life experiences, but your passions for life remain more stable. Autism is and should not be a limiting criterion as your question implies. Autism is not a disability, but your unique and profound gift. Use it as such. Never let anyone make you feel different. You can excel at whatever level you want and just want without limits.

There is no such thing as mild autism. Either you have it or you don't. It is not a disease that you can have just a little bit.

However, it can affect your life to a lesser degree. The DSM-5 calls it level 1 autism - you only need little support.

It is stereotypical to say so, but it is a fact. Autism and information technology are a good combination. Software testing is something many people with autism can be really good at, for example.

It depends on what interests you and what you want to do. My two jobs that work best for me are being a substitute teacher's aide or a very basic office assistant.

It depends on what interests that person or their hobbies or special interests. For example, I work in the creative field. There is no "best" job for autistic people.

Write anonymously for obvious reasons.

Yes, very hard.

So hard that I don't even feel like working. It is difficult for me to get and keep a job. simply because many times I don't learn fast enough. It can be frustrating when people don't understand that and label you "lazy, underperforming who just needs to listen and try harder." Very frustrating man.

My case is a bit more complicated than that of the average person with autism spectrum disorder (high functioning). In my case, I have difficulties learning, in addition to having problems relating to my classmates.

I graduated from college in 2016. I have been looking

Keep reading

Write anonymously for obvious reasons.

Yes, very hard.

So hard that I don't even feel like working. It is difficult for me to get and keep a job. simply because many times I don't learn fast enough. It can be frustrating when people don't understand that and label you "lazy, underperforming who just needs to listen and try harder." Very frustrating man.

My case is a bit more complicated than that of the average person with autism spectrum disorder (high functioning). In my case, I have difficulties learning, in addition to having problems relating to my classmates.

I graduated from university in 2016. I have been looking for a job or have been thinking about looking for a job since before (around 2015). It has taken me years of frustration thus far and it continues to be a frustration.

I got interviews for good companies (you want to work for) in 2015, but the interviews were bad, so I wasn't getting a lot of work even though I wanted to get it. With my mother very impatient and threatening her (yes, if you are autistic and have a bully for a mother who does not understand. It can be very, very frustrating). I had desperately accepted a very bad job in 2016 in relation to my area of ​​study. I wasn't learning fast enough due to my lack of motor skills, as well as being able to follow directions in general. I was fired in 4 months.

My second job was a few months later, which was a similar shit job to the first. At first things seemed to be going well. I really enjoyed the job. I had a few days where I felt out of place, but just normal things (I didn't think about any of that just because it was "new"). I was also friendly with my co-workers. But things started to fall apart the first month. I was having trouble with my manager, he seemed a bit out of place meeting her. Just a month after I started working, she is trying to let me go.

I made some mistakes. So my boss came to the conclusion that my performance sucks (which of course it did, I'm not saying it was the best from the start). The problem was, the boss was trying to use intimidation tactics. He put me on a kind of training program where I had to learn my tasks and to make matters worse, there was a time limit in which I had to do it (it was very little time). If I didn't exceed the time limit, they had to put me on a performance improvement plan. So I was constantly working, going on weekends and staying up late to learn my assignments. Making every effort throughout the working day to learn my tasks. However, due to the intimidating nature of my boss, my performance worsened due to his constant reprimands and threats of punishment. It was very annoying. Finally, I was put on the PIP BEFORE the time limit ran out, and then I started to get riled up. and more concerned. I finally managed to get my assignments down as confirmed by a co-worker who was training me. I had done all of my tasks without a hitch in the span of a few hours (shorter than my work day and faster than ever). Unfortunately, while I was working on an assignment I had pending. The security guard came and called me into his office, and I saw the human resources manager there. I knew this was bad, of course, and had my termination papers delivered to me at that office. I asked why and they said "well, you're just not the right person." They knew about my diagnosis. They all did, but they didn't care. I had done all of my tasks without a hitch in the span of a few hours (shorter than my work day and faster than ever). Unfortunately, while I was working on an assignment I had pending. The security guard came and called me into his office, and I saw the human resources manager there. I knew this was bad, of course, and had my termination papers delivered to me at that office. I asked why and they said "well, you're just not the right person." They knew about my diagnosis. They all did, but they didn't care. I had done all of my tasks without a hitch in the span of a few hours (shorter than my work day and faster than ever). Unfortunately, while I was working on an assignment I had pending. The security guard came and called me into his office, and I saw the human resources manager there. I knew this was bad, of course, and had my termination papers delivered to me at that office. I asked why and they said "well, you're just not the right person." They knew about my diagnosis. They all did, but they didn't care. I asked why and they said "well, you're just not the right person." They knew about my diagnosis. They all did, but they didn't care. I asked why and they said "well, you're just not the right person." They knew about my diagnosis. They all did, but they didn't care.

No, she was actually avoiding me and she was ready to let me go. She was trying to let me go. When I told him about my autism and my learning disabilities. She didn't understand or care. She simply said, “I don't care what you have, I don't care if you have a high or low IQ. I don't care about his medical condition. I want the work to be done like that, and only like that ”.

I tell you all this so you know how difficult it can be. If you're like most high achievers with autism, you probably just need to interview a bit and then get a job. Most people on the autism spectrum have trouble simply socializing. I have trouble both socializing and learning, which can be VERY frustrating, especially when normal people don't understand.

The internet always bites into this.

Be careful in the workplace. People are not inherently kind. They are intimidating and terrible if you don't learn fast enough. That makes everyone mad at you

Yes, I know it's my fault that all of this happened, but I'll keep trying, of course.

The key problem with being on the autism spectrum is that people don't understand it. Not even my parents of all people really understood the subject at all.

Very simply, in certain circumstances, you just don't tell your employer that you are autistic. If you did and they still hired you, then that's more of a problem. None of my employers knew that I was from Asperger. Anyway, it should be irrelevant. How do you show that you were not hired because you are a paraplegic, female, or minority? You must do it by being at least three times better at your job than the best NT. Which fortunately is very easy. It hardly seems fair to be much better than they are. It is like an adult beating small children. I got bored with a job and left. I do that because

Keep reading

Very simply, in certain circumstances, you just don't tell your employer that you are autistic. If you did and they still hired you, then that's more of a problem. None of my employers knew that I was from Asperger. Anyway, it should be irrelevant. How do you show that you were not hired because you are a paraplegic, female, or minority? You must do it by being at least three times better at your job than the best NT. Which fortunately is very easy. It hardly seems fair to be much better than they are. It is like an adult beating small children. I got bored with a job and left. I do that because I know how to do excellent interviews. All he does is study the company and its ethics and then mirror the interviewer, especially using the exact same words as him. They are so easy to manipulate.

Here's a very recent story to illustrate how the world really works. Recently, for the first time in the history of this planet, an autistic actor was given the role of an autistic person. Now it is unique and pioneering. Whether this will happen again remains to be seen, as the media industry pretends to worry. You see, this young autistic woman is also a woman and she's black. There are 3 boxes that the company can check on the equality form. That is why they gave him the role. No other reason. There are millions of people who are employed not because they are good at their job, but because they are beautiful, have a friend at the company, or are related to someone there. Then there are the ones who are only there because of who they have slept with. That is the reality of the work environment. Here's a fun fact for you. Only 4% of the world's population is 6ft 3 or taller, yet more than 30% of CEOs of the top 500 companies are over that height. Does this mean that tall people are smarter or work harder? No, it means that NTs are dumb as stumps and judge everything by appearances.

That means you don't have to show that you were only employed because you are autistic, you just have to make it look like you weren't. So you work incredibly hard and you do your job better than anyone. Eventually, they will have to admit that you are not there to check a box. The best thing is that with NT being so gullible and superficial, you can get up and do nothing. Because now they have put you in the hardworking employee's box. Now I have never done that, but I have seen it done numerous times by NT. If someone pays me, I do my job to the best of my ability. What do I recommend you do? Also, how is it your fault that you were hired because you are autistic? Are these coworkers hard to think of? I guess he doesn't make job decisions. Jennifer Lawrence doesn't say " You are paying me too much for this role in the movie, I insist that you only give me $ 5 million and 1% of the gross. Which is fair. ”He takes what he can get and constantly pushes for even more money to pretend to be something he is not.

Yes, the last job I had was about 20 years ago at 29 years old. Vocational rehabilitation helped me get there. It was a clerical job at a nonprofit organization that helped families get respite care (basically babysitting) and life skills coaches for their struggling relative. You thought this would be right for me. INCORRECT!! I live in Charlotte NC and the company was divided into two entities: one serving Charlotte and the other serving the surrounding counties. The lady who hired me had a degree in special education and would go out of her way to help me. She left with the office that served the surrounding area.

Keep reading

Yes, the last job I had was about 20 years ago at 29 years old. Vocational rehabilitation helped me get there. It was a clerical job at a nonprofit organization that helped families get respite care (basically babysitting) and life skills coaches for their struggling relative. You thought this would be right for me. INCORRECT!! I live in Charlotte NC and the company was divided into two entities: one serving Charlotte and the other serving the surrounding counties. The lady who hired me had a degree in special education and would go out of her way to help me. She left with the office that served the surrounding counties. I was NOT allowed to choose who I went with because if I did I would still be employed to this day. When they fired me He was working 40 a week, but at great cost because he was taking three medications to keep that job: ridalin, prozac, and buspar. He also had something called a job coach, which was a joke. I never got into a good working relationship with one. Every week a different one came to see how he was. If it was the same, they would have known I was about to be fired and could have warned me about it. Mom and I thought the only way I was getting that job in the first place was that a former job coach was working there. I was in charge of filing, but I didn't make sure the archives were there. The file was always backed up and I was always at fault when it was NOT my job to keep up with the files. He would keep lists of the missing files and hand them over. If it was the same, they would have known I was about to be fired and could have warned me about it. Mom and I thought the only way I was getting that job in the first place was that a former job coach was working there. I was in charge of filing, but I didn't make sure the archives were there. The file was always backed up and I was always at fault when it was NOT my job to keep up with the files. He would keep lists of the missing files and hand them over. If it was the same, they would have known I was about to be fired and could have warned me about it. Mom and I thought the only way I was getting that job in the first place was that a former job coach was working there. I was in charge of filing, but I wasn't making sure the files were there. The file was always backed up and I was always at fault when it was NOT my job to keep up with the files. He would keep lists of the missing files and hand them over.

Also, Voc Rehab got me a volunteer job at the Red Cross to write down names and addresses for their transportation service. They complained about my handwriting. Mom told them to buy a computer because I'm an excellent typist. But instead they chose to fire me.

As I approach retirement in a few months, I am "looking back". A review of my time in the workforce. Half a dozen years doing administrative work in a police department, twenty-two and a half years working for Uncle Sam in Washington, DC in various jobs, mainly as a librarian, and currently a substitute teacher aide in the school district where I went to school. myself.

There were several jobs that I held for a short time before landing in the police department and most of them I would like to easily erase from my memory as a file or a message on my computer. When looking back ove

Keep reading

As I approach retirement in a few months, I am "looking back". A review of my time in the workforce. Half a dozen years doing administrative work in a police department, twenty-two and a half years working for Uncle Sam in Washington, DC in various jobs, mainly as a librarian, and currently a substitute teacher aide in the school district where I went to school. myself.

There were several jobs that I held for a short time before landing in the police department and most of them I would like to easily erase from my memory as a file or a message on my computer. Looking back at jobs that felt as comfortable as a worn, old pair of shoes and those in which I suppose a polar bear would feel on the beach, there is one factor that stands out above all others. The jobs that I look back on with a smile are the ones that were based on my strengths, like seeing things through a microscope rather than a telescope (detail-minded).

The jobs I should have stayed away from were the ones that required the most social interaction, like a clerk in a toy store, especially during the Christmas season. Another was the work of a phlebotomist who drew blood from patients of all ages and sizes. In that job, I scared an old woman to the point that she "kicked" me out of her room. And then there was the patient from whom I took three tubes of blood by mistake.

I spent almost a decade cataloging books. It was one of my favorites because the books didn't respond to me with any complaints. I was left practically alone to catalog each book, periodical, etc. and give them the appropriate place on the shelves. But when I switched to interlibrary loans, I was utterly unhappy dealing with library consumers who viewed a book's expiration date as a mere suggestion. It was only natural to keep track of library loan procedures due to my meticulous and organizational skills. However, dealing with people from other libraries and library patrons led me to the point that I only lasted one year on the job. It was 355 days too many.

My time in the workforce has been a constant stream of learning experiences. My current job as a school learning assistant puts me around people, but a lot of my assignments are with school kids who are also on the Spectrum. If it weren't for this job and being exposed for the first time to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), I would still be in the dark about having ASD. This work is therapeutic because helping those who are on the same spectrum as me also helps me.

Simply put, the best jobs for me have been those that build on my strengths. We have to deal with our weaknesses on the job, but if the job includes more than one's strengths, it will probably be a good fit. There is the "people" factor of who you work for and who you work with. I know very well that a bad company can turn a job that fits well into a nightmare. But still, I'd say when looking for one job or another, consider the ones that most align with your talents. One can think of it this way. Each job task is a slice of a cake. If most of the pie is based on one's strengths, then the job will most likely end up on one's favorites list rather than on the "hated as a passion" list.

This only applies to the US, but large companies with mature HR departments are best for someone who chooses to disclose their autism, especially if a formal accommodation is required.

A larger company is used to the idea of ​​accommodations and may already have experience successfully integrating someone with autism. They are also more likely to have standards of behavior for everyone else to be enforced.

Ultra-small businesses can be nice if the owner is understanding and understanding, but it can be more difficult to find a comfortable niche.

I would be wary of medium size outfits that are

Keep reading

This only applies to the US, but large companies with mature HR departments are best for someone who chooses to disclose their autism, especially if a formal accommodation is required.

A larger company is used to the idea of ​​accommodations and may already have experience successfully integrating someone with autism. They are also more likely to have standards of behavior for everyone else to be enforced.

Ultra-small businesses can be nice if the owner is understanding and understanding, but it can be more difficult to find a comfortable niche.

I'd be wary of mid-size teams that aren't big enough for dedicated HR, but have regular staff turnover. It is illegal, but they can easily discriminate ("doesn't fit in well" is a universal concept) and they won't have a good system to handle interpersonal problems.

The most important part is aligning your strengths and weaknesses. Personally, I would say that sensory issues can be the biggest challenge. There are jobs that don't require a lot of socialization, but working around machinery, dirty dishes, or unkempt customers can be a major hurdle for those with sensory issues.

Places like McDonald's are always hiring, but you'll probably want to try in a bigger, busier place. I know that's counterintuitive, but a bigger store means more staff and more expertise. It might be possible for them to support an employee who only cleans the lobby, does the dishes, or works in the grill area. A small store may have only 2-3 people working at a time, so each person does a little of everything.

A place like Walmart could be good too, as there are a few types of jobs (cashier, warehouse, food service, etc.).

It's not the time of year, but landscaping companies can be a good entry-level option. Even if sound is a problem, some companies are big enough to help someone pull the weeds.

I hope that helps!

It is easy to say in any high IQ job that there are many people with Asperger's, but that is often based on the correlation of autistic traits with traits that are valuable in such jobs; logical thinking, an eye for details, deep knowledge in an area, etc. However, if you ask the same question but add that you need a formal diagnosis for Asperger's, the results may be different.

In the UK, with a figure of 1 in 64 having a formal diagnosis, and only 15% have a full-time job against 75% of the IIRC for the non-autistic population, if you do a little statistics (theorem of Bayes), then the p

Keep reading

It is easy to say in any high IQ job that there are many people with Asperger's, but that is often based on the correlation of autistic traits with traits that are valuable in such jobs; logical thinking, an eye for details, deep knowledge in an area, etc. However, if you ask the same question but add that you need a formal diagnosis for Asperger's, the results may be different.

In the UK with a figure of 1 in 64 having a formal diagnosis, and only 15% have a full time job against 75% of the IIRC for the non-autistic population, if you do a little statistics (theorem of Bayes), so the probability that someone in employment is formally autistic is 0.003125 or about 3 in 1000.

Therefore, it should be quite rare to find an autistic person at work. However, in the government lab where I work, I personally know at least 10 and the lab has around 3000 people. When we informally performed the Wired or AQ test in the lab, about 15% scored 32+, which is the marker where only 97 out of 80 people would qualify for a formal diagnosis. Almost all, if not all, of the autistic population diagnosed or not requires minimal accommodation, if any, although that does not mean that professional development is easy, especially with a formal diagnosis.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.