What are the best answers for job interview questions?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Finley White



What are the best answers for job interview questions?

Thanks for asking. This is my answer. I don't know how many times I've been asked how to do well in a job interview. But it has been frequent enough that it is time to summarize much of it. This is what I do.

First, "I do my research."

Then I prepare to answer the following questions:

  1. Why did you leave previous jobs?
  2. Please tell us how you have solved problems or achieved results in xxxxxxxxx situations in the past or how you would do it in the future.
  3. What can we tell you about this job?

Finally, directly before the interview, I do the following:

  • Do something fun, like dining out, watching a movie, or visiting
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Thanks for asking. This is my answer. I don't know how many times I've been asked how to do well in a job interview. But it has been frequent enough that it is time to summarize much of it. This is what I do.

First, "I do my research."

Then I prepare to answer the following questions:

  1. Why did you leave previous jobs?
  2. Please tell us how you have solved problems or achieved results in xxxxxxxxx situations in the past or how you would do it in the future.
  3. What can we tell you about this job?

Finally, directly before the interview, I do the following:

  • Do something fun, like going out to dinner, watching a movie, or visiting friends.
  • Then get a good night's sleep.
  • Eat a healthy breakfast.
  • Give me an extra half hour longer than necessary to get to the interview.
  • Register at least 15 minutes in advance.
  • Do not schedule anything else for the hour after the interview, in case it is long.
  • Turn off my phone or at least silence it before or when greeting the interviewer.
  • Being my self.
  • Illustrate all of my responses with examples from my past, or at least my thought process if I don't have any specific examples to share.
  • Remember that I am interviewing them, just as much as they are interviewing me, and act accordingly.
  • Bonus points: I don't do this as often as I should, but it can be helpful to find the interviewer ahead of time on LinkedIn and / or other appropriate social media. This will tell me how they want me to think about them and possibly inform what topics we could discuss.

Marie, my opinion is that you have read the posted job description and think about the details of how the job skills history is applied. Then get a good night's sleep, and when you sit across from the interviewer, be yourself, look the person in the eye, and establish the favorable factors that apply to you for the advertised position. When asked, answer honestly. Good luck.

Carver wrightman

aka Cecil R. Williams

What are the best answers for job interview questions?

This is simple: the truest ones for you.

Big question.

I find 'what questions can I answer for you?' be one of the most useful parts of an interview, because it gives the candidate a forum to interview me. You can learn a lot from the types of questions they ask.

For me, the worst thing to do is say 'I have no questions.' Seriously? Are you ready to commit the next X years of your life to working for me if I make you an offer and you don't have any questions? This makes the applicant seem submissive, disinterested or like an 'I know everything', depending on how you say it. The only time I don't care about this is if the candidate has passed

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Big question.

I find 'what questions can I answer for you?' be one of the most useful parts of an interview, because it gives the candidate a forum to interview me. You can learn a lot from the types of questions they ask.

For me, the worst thing to do is say 'I have no questions.' Seriously? Are you ready to commit the next X years of your life to working for me if I make you an offer and you don't have any questions? This makes the applicant seem submissive, disinterested or like an 'I know everything', depending on how you say it. The only time I don't care about this is if the candidate has been through a series of interviews and says 'I think your colleagues have already answered most of my questions'.

The next worst thing you can do is ask sensitive questions. For example ... 'how much vacation time will I have?', Or 'how many breaks do I have each day?' Those types of questions are best for after you receive an offer and are talking to HR to finalize your offer. They are not a good use of an interviewer's time and make it sound like someone who is going to be a 'rules attorney' or just interested in cashing a paycheck, rather than someone who is genuinely interested in doing the job. .

Good questions are about the job itself, the company, or the interviewer's experience with any of them. However, even those kinds of questions can be asked wrong. Asking questions that show ignorance about the company is bad, especially if they could have been answered by spending 5 minutes on the company website before the interview. For example, asking "Is the company publicly traded?" Or "What are your main products?" they are a waste of time for the interviewer and show that you are not ready for the interview.

However, taking those same questions and thinking about them can make it come out much better. For example, 'I see that the performance of the company's stock has been very strong over the last two years, after a long period of decline. What has the company done to drive this improvement and do you think it is sustainable? 'However, keep the questions relevant to the role and level of the job you are applying for. If it's a technical job, it might be appropriate to ask questions about product architecture, development methodology, etc. If it is a sales job, you might ask what differentiates the company's products from major competitors.

Other types of questions that I like are related to the culture of the company and the growth path of the employees. A simple but good one is 'Why is the position I am applying for currently vacant?' Another one that I like is 'Tell me about your experience in the company?', Directed to the interviewer. Another is "What is a typical workday like for someone in the position I'm applying for?" Same with 'What are the opportunities for advancement from this position?' Or 'What are the performance metrics for the position?' Each of these shows that the employee is interested in how they would fit into the company culture, what they would have to do to be successful, and that they have an interest in staying with the company for the longer term.

Lastly, I prefer a candidate who is interviewing me while I interview them. Done correctly, a candidate can ask some specific questions and ask the interviewer to explain something they said during the course of the interview. You don't have to wait until the end to ask your questions.

I hope this helps.

I have worked for about 10 companies and they have interviewed me about 30 times and these are the most common.

"Tell us about you"

This should be a short and tall overview of the package you are selling. for example: you.

“I have been doing software development in all fields for almost 20 years. My first experience with the software was at the age of 12 looking and putting sprites in my room and I have loved it ever since. "

"Where do you see yourself in 5 years?"

"Sitting in your chair" <- this is a funny one that I used to joke about until I was really old. Now i say

"Doing the same things that I have always done and loved"

I generally

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I have worked for about 10 companies and they have interviewed me about 30 times and these are the most common.

"Tell us about you"

This should be a short and tall overview of the package you are selling. for example: you.

“I have been doing software development in all fields for almost 20 years. My first experience with the software was at the age of 12 looking and putting sprites in my room and I have loved it ever since. "

"Where do you see yourself in 5 years?"

"Sitting in your chair" <- this is a funny one that I used to joke about until I was really old. Now i say

"Doing the same things that I have always done and loved"

Usually I expand on this because I hate political nonsense in my field. I am constantly approached to be a software administrator, but tbh, that's not my bag. First, for every 10 engineering positions there is 1 managerial position. Second, the longer you're away from software, the more those skills will atrophy. I've seen it over and over with managers. I don't want to be that guy. Practical coding is a must. Technical leadership is as high as I want to be at this point in my career.

"What is your greatest weakness?"

A coworker bragged about this one and it works but it's not honest to me so I only used it once. It's pretty good, but I generally give the latter because it seems more genuine.

"I am relentless" <- also works as a fortress

My answer is to be frank. I will continue in my field in any way, whether you hire me or not. "I am weak with algorithms." I usually expand on this by saying that I have coded technical documents before, but do not invert binary trees during my daily activities. It's silly to think that. I have also written a TON of KPIs for dashboards.

"What is your greatest strength?"

"I'm relentless" <- again. It can also work as a weakness, but I try to avoid this canned answer.

I generally state that in my field, I have a proven track record of adaptability and stay ahead of the curve in terms of technology.

"Do you have any question for me?"

Depending on the rounds of interviews, ask at least one question about what they envision you doing at their company. You need an idea of ​​their expectations of you there.

Ask about your tech stack.

How old is the base code?

Are you agile? waterfall?

release cycles?

Anything to understand your daily activities.

If you are in round 2 or 3 of the interview process and they ask this question again, I would say that all of your questions were answered by (insert name of previous interviewers) and anything else will be answered once you look under the hood .

"Why our company?"

This I rarely see unless it is a startup. If you "REALLY" want this startup, I hope you see a future with it and say it as such. For example: This looks amazing, and I imagine you guys are going to be the greyhound bus super or something. I only got this question early in my career. Today, you have to introduce me to your company. I've seen it all. Startup, Fortune 5, and anywhere in between. If you are really senior and in high demand, this question is rarely asked.

Beyond these questions, there will be technical questions related to your field. I've seen some crazy questions when opening a job for the first time. Avoid interviews if the position has just been opened and the company is medium in size. They will ask some stupid questions that no one knows, and then back off once no one can answer them. Usually after a week, they'll set the bar a little lower. Unfortunately, they usually pass a person who was a near-perfect fit and settle for someone mediocre just to fill the seat.

Just my observations.

My experience from the few interviews I've been through teaches me that you should be prepared to answer the following questions.

  1. Why this position? They are guaranteed to ask this. If you can't answer this, why are you requesting?
  2. Do you have any question for me? This will be asked at the end of the interview and it is imperative that you have the questions ready. Make sure your questions are deep; don't ask anything you can find out by reading the front page of the organization's website. These two questions 1 and 2 are the most important. If you end up preparing for something, these
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My experience from the few interviews I've been through teaches me that you should be prepared to answer the following questions.

  1. Why this position? They are guaranteed to ask this. If you can't answer this, why are you requesting?
  2. Do you have any question for me? This will be asked at the end of the interview and it is imperative that you have the questions ready. Make sure your questions are deep; don't ask anything you can find out by reading the front page of the organization's website. These two questions 1 and 2 are the most important. If you end up preparing for something, these are the things to prepare.
  3. What extracurricular activities do you participate in (if it's a college interview)? What do you do for fun (if it's another type of interview)?
  4. You will often be asked who is an influential person in your life. It may be specifically about someone other than the parents. Make sure to think a little before your interview.
  5. What are your strengths and weaknesses? This is a fairly common question on the board. I love this video because it teaches you how to answer the question: 2:20 in this video:

6. They will also ask you questions about your background, interests, and motivation, so be prepared for this.

Bonus: I've heard some interesting questions and requests in the past. These honorable mentions include:

  1. Make up something and describe it to me.
  2. Which animal best portrays your personality?
  3. What does the sign do to you?
  4. Tell me seven uses of a spoon.

If you get one of these, your interviewer is just checking how you handle questions in the moment and is not prepared. Whatever you do, finish answering their question. If you stop, for example, at 5 uses of a spoon and never finish, this is a huge red flag for the organization and you may be downgraded on your request.

If you ask for an interview, good luck. Dress in a full suit if you are a man, as this guy explains:

Whatever is going through your mind, don't be nervous. Be yourself and try to make a good impression. You'll do fine.

Vote if it is useful to you!

...

Good luck!

There are hundreds of questions that can be asked and you cannot prepare for all of them. To some extent, the interview is a test of how you think about things and how you answer different questions.

  • Tell me a little about yourself? First, "small" is an important clue. Second, do not provide your complete history or even your complete employment history. Third, it's about your speech ... what skills you offer them. Two or perhaps three recent achievements should be more than enough. You may get follow-up questions, but that's a good thing. Oh, and don't make things up.
  • Why did you leave (or leave) your
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There are hundreds of questions that can be asked and you cannot prepare for all of them. To some extent, the interview is a test of how you think about things and how you answer different questions.

  • Tell me a little about yourself? First, "small" is an important clue. Second, do not provide your complete history or even your complete employment history. Third, it's about your speech ... what skills you offer them. Two or perhaps three recent achievements should be more than enough. You may get follow-up questions, but that's a good thing. Oh, and don't make things up.
  • Why did you leave (or are you leaving) your last job? Be honest.
  • What are your weaknesses? It's a popular question along with "what are your strengths". You don't need to spend too much time on this; They're just looking for how you look at yourself Do not get into personal things ... they are only talking about things related to work.
  • Why do you want to work here? They want to know that you've given it some thought. "Because I need a job" is not what they are looking for. However, you don't need to be wordy.
  • What salary are you looking for? I see a lot of advice on not answering this question directly, but have never gotten one of the suggested answers to work. The company has a budgeted range and they want to see if you fit into that range. At some point, they will push for an answer or they will move on to someone else.
  • What do you know about the company? Friend, research the company before the interview. Know your products and services; at least the basics. You don't need to know his full story, but a guy once said "nothing" to me. Next.
  • Why should we hire you? This is another opportunity for your presentation; What do you bring to the company? You must find a way to indicate that you can do the job, that you fit in with the team, and that you are a great choice (better than the other candidates).
  • Tell me about a challenge or conflict you faced at work and how you handled it. They are looking to see if you get angry with others or if you can resolve conflicts well. Do you listen to other people? Are you committed to finding the best solution? Briefly set the scene, describe your responsibility (the task), describe what you did to solve it, and briefly explain the outcome (or how it worked). It is a short story; technical details don't help.
  • Where do you see yourself in 5 years? They seek to see what your expectations are and if they are realistic. I hate this question because I don't have a 5 year plan. Personally, I don't think that way.

Like I said, there are many others. Some are job specific. You should also think about the questions you want to ask them. You're interviewing the company to see if you want to work there, right? It goes both ways.

First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

"I see you

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First, don't be put off by this question. I have seen many HR companies use this as a tactic, mentioning the many applicants they are considering, when the reality is that they have none. What the employer wants is for you to answer the question that you currently cannot. Why should they hire you?

Here's a mad libs script, edit it however you like.

"While I am not aware of the skills of the other candidates you are considering, I believe that my ability at _____ will benefit you at _______."

Follow up with a good example of how you've accomplished that goal. If you've done your research, you can try:

“I see that you need _______, and in my experience doing _________ I was able to achieve _________ for a recent employer. "

If you've really delved deeper, maybe you'll also talk about your core values. And show how you can align with them and help them achieve their goals.

It is a vague answer because the interviewer asks a vague question.

There was a period in my life, albeit brief, when I worked as a job recruiter. As a job recruiter I had several advantages and learned many things. All of this was before the Internet.

As a recruiter, we would have applicants enter the office with a wide variety of experience and job requirements. Although I was expected to complete this interview in 7 minutes, most of the time, I spent a lot more than that getting to know them. This was important to me because if I believed in my candidate, I worked especially hard for him. Once this initial interview was over, I chose

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There was a period in my life, albeit brief, when I worked as a job recruiter. As a job recruiter I had several advantages and learned many things. All of this was before the Internet.

As a recruiter, we would have applicants enter the office with a wide variety of experience and job requirements. Although I was expected to complete this interview in 7 minutes, most of the time, I spent a lot more than that getting to know them. This was important to me because if I believed in my candidate, I worked especially hard for him. Once this initial interview was over, I took a fairly unique approach to finding a position for them. Rather than go through the pile of "work orders" produced by other recruiters, I chose to cold call employers. I wanted a job where there was no competition for my candidate.

I personally contacted many employers and "proposed" to my applicants by showing them all the wonderful qualities and excellent experience. When I finally found a match and agreed on the time and place for the interview. I never did it for the same day.

I had arranged for the applicant to show up at my office about half an hour before the interview. I checked that they were dressed appropriately, made up to perfection. I then proceeded to give them instructions on who they would meet and where. The last instruction was to return to my office immediately after the interview.

"Well, how did it go?" I would ask. Incredible some of the things they said, I found that their gestures in this interview were quite different from my previous interviews. After this face-to-face with the applicant, I would call the employer and ask "Well, how did it go?" I learned a lot from these chats. I made a plan to improve the odds.

During that second applicant / recruiter interview, I gave these additional instructions:

  • When they get to the place, and they always do, where they ask "Do you have any questions?" Your answer is "Yes, I would like to know if you think I am qualified for this position." They were horrified! Oh, I couldn't do that! Why not? You can't lose a job you don't have. You've got nothing to lose
  • If they say no, I don't think you're what we're looking for, then ask "Why?" Whatever the answer, now you have a chance to sell. How much you really like what you hear. How fast you learn. That you've always been a team player, etc. This will be interrupted as enthusiasm for work and will show them a side of you that they missed. It can even be recovered in your favor.

After the interview between the applicant and the employer, he would always call the employer and congratulate him on his decision to hire or to ask why he was not hiring. The responses I got helped me close the deal or at least help the applicant by making sure that mistake didn't happen again.

I got pretty good at this and when I sent 5 out for an interview, 4 came back with an offer to hire. Usually the fifth was sent for a different interview in a few days and got that job, because I was able to give them direct instructions on what to do and say or not.

Later I went to college, got my bachelor's and master's in business administration. As a professional, I found that these same instructions worked for me. When I went to an interview, I always received an offer. When I say always, I mean always. Over time, they would ask me "When can you start?", "How much do you need in salary?" They even told me that the title they were interviewing for was not within the range of my salary requirements, so "What should we I'll call you?"

To get these interviews, I used my network of contacts. I even made a cold call when a contact gave me enough information about a company that I wasn't even looking at but was having trouble installing their system. All he needed was a name. And if you read my response to Pat Ruge's answer to What “blew your mind” during a job interview?

As I always received an offer and because they always gave me my required salary, my friends often asked me "Why didn't you ask for more?" My answer: "Because I know my worth." Know your worth and be all that you can be. You have to believe it to see it.

God bless you and God bless America

BE Placement ..

Company: IBM

Authorized technical interview.

Here's the whole HR interview process:

HR: (after looking at my resume) Ohk ... Ritesh, tell me about yourself ...

I said ...

HR: Ritesh, is this your first life interview?

Me: No sir ...

HR: So you gave an interview to which company?

Me: Infosys, Cognizant, Accenture and Wipro.

HR: Great, why do you want to join IBM? You have so many other options.

Me: sir The results of these results from all companies together with IBM (as the pool campus progresses) and I have heard from seniors as IBM is a globally recognized company and I love research work and the scope of entering

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BE Placement ..

Company: IBM

Authorized technical interview.

Here's the whole HR interview process:

HR: (after looking at my resume) Ohk ... Ritesh, tell me about yourself ...

I said ...

HR: Ritesh, is this your first life interview?

Me: No sir ...

HR: So you gave an interview to which company?

Me: Infosys, Cognizant, Accenture and Wipro.

HR: Great, why do you want to join IBM? You have so many other options.

Me: sir The results of these results from all companies together with IBM (as the pool campus progresses) and I have heard from seniors as IBM is a globally recognized company and I love research work , and the scope of entering the field of research is very great if I join IBM.

HR: ok ... last question, what is the use of the chair?

Me: (what a silly question and I started to answer)

  1. The chair is mainly used for sitting.
  2. We used to keep all our cloths and other things only on the chair.
  3. we can use it as a ladder to hang something above our height.

Again I began to think ...

HR: Tell me something else.

Me: we can use it in games.

Again I began to think ...

HR: I smiled and said ... Think and say something else ...

Me: I thought a lot and then the chair sir can be used in dance steps.

Silence ... I expected more and more ...

I was completely irritated ...

HR: Think of Ritesh Think ...

Me: In a completely frustrated mood

  • Sir chair can be used as a weapon, we can hit our enemy by throwing chairs at him.
  • During suicide, you can use the chair (Thinking Go and hang from the ceiling fan)

HR: He stopped me and said: These negative sentences are not expected of you Guyz. You can go.

I really felt sorry for not being able to answer this stupid question.

So it's like this ...

1.The most asked question ever ...

2 the complicated ...

3. To check your mental strength

4. Expectations

5.Weaknesses and strengths

6 Situational question

7. The last ...

I hope that helps..

Thanks

Hv

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So it's like this ...

1.The most asked question ever ...

2 the complicated ...

3. To check your mental strength

4. Expectations

5.Weaknesses and strengths

6 Situational question

7. The last ...

I hope that helps..

Thanks

Hv

Si me preguntas, las mejores respuestas de las entrevistas de trabajo son aquellas en las que controlas el flujo de la discusión. ¿Es eso posible? Sí mucho. Pero necesitas ser realmente inteligente; bien preparado y con un gran sentido de anticipación para poder controlar la narrativa.

You could prepare your resume and answers in ways that would be compelling enough to direct the interviewers to your key strengths, skills, experience etc., and make them believe that you are the best fit for the job.

Wish you good luck.

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