What are the benefits of granting an official status to a Pidgin language like Nigerian Pidgin English?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Sara Austin



What are the benefits of granting an official status to a Pidgin language like Nigerian Pidgin English?

It will do some good.

It will encourage more people to get an education. There are many people who can speak Pidgin English very fluently, but they cannot construct a simple sentence or write a paragraph in English. These people do not see education as something they can do. My mother, who is in her sixties, cannot speak or write English (although she does read it a little), but she can communicate perfectly in Pidgin English. She loved school, but had to drop out of elementary school because her father died when she was very little. If pidgin is an official language, maybe the idea of ​​g

Keep reading

It will do some good.

It will encourage more people to get an education. There are many people who can speak Pidgin English very fluently, but they cannot construct a simple sentence or write a paragraph in English. These people do not see education as something they can do. My mother, who is in her sixties, cannot speak or write English (although she does read it a little), but she can communicate perfectly in Pidgin English. She loved school, but had to drop out of elementary school because her father died when she was very little. If Pidgin is an official language, the idea of ​​going back to school might have crossed your mind.

It will make more people feel confident. Imagine the mechanic or carpenter who cannot speak or write English correctly while doing banking transactions. Most of these people avoid banks and similar places like hell. They feel inadequate and inferior to others who can simply make their requests in English. If Pidgin ever becomes the official language, most of these guys will walk into various places with their heads held high. My older brother told me a story about something that happened when he was in elementary school. A child was pressured, he needs to urinate. He could not walk to the teacher because the vernacular was not allowed in the school and he could not express himself in English. Well, he ended up peeing on himself, right in the classroom.

It will make us unique. I like the fact that in some countries you don't have to learn English to get an education. Russians, Germans, French, Estonians, and various countries teach in their language. Making Pidgin English an official language will make us unique in the world.

The Nigerian Pidgin, also known as the West African Creole in some circles, will have some benefits if it is granted official status.

One of those benefits is that it will serve as a unifying factor for the various tribes and ethnic groups in the country, as Pidgin is something we all have in common. To some extent, he is already doing so even in his unofficial capacity.

Having said this,

No waka left one.

Small, I think.

It will lower the barrier that prevents others from knowing.

But when you contrast this with the fact that it is non-standard (it varies from place to place) and that there are very few Nigerians for whom Pidgin is the language they speak best, you will see that it is too expensive.

It could be a game changer for lower class and working people in Nigeria, from an economic and social point of view. However, it will not solve the problem of mismanagement and corruption.

My ex-girlfriend was from Nigeria and I'm a Google maniac, so when, two years after our breakup, I got an African client (he hadn't specified nationality), the following happened when he showed the sketches for the site. he wanted:

Me: Oh, it's Nigeria, and your idea is to assign each state one of the recognized minority languages ​​(Yoruba, Igbo, Hausa) and let subscribers choose that or English for their ads. Correct?

Customer (a raised eyebrow): Correct.

Me: That's 37 states to track, no problem.

Customer: 36.

Me: Yes, of course, but the system will treat the FCT as a state, the same but

Keep reading

My ex-girlfriend was from Nigeria and I'm a Google maniac, so when, two years after our breakup, I got an African client (he hadn't specified nationality), the following happened when he showed the sketches for the site. he wanted:

Me: Oh, it's Nigeria, and your idea is to assign each state one of the recognized minority languages ​​(Yoruba, Igbo, Hausa) and let subscribers choose that or English for their ads. Correct?

Customer (a raised eyebrow): Correct.

Me: That's 37 states to track, no problem.

Customer: 36.

Me: Yes, of course, but the system will treat the FCT as a state, the same but different.

Me again: By the way, out of curiosity, what language will you assign to Abuja, sorry, the FCT? Yoruba?

Customer (now both eyebrows raised): No, Hausa.

Me: YES OF COURSE, I'm stupid. President Buhari is from the north, so obviously it is Hausa now that he is the new president.

Customer: WHY DO YOU KNOW THIS? YOU ARE SWEDEN!

Lots of laughs and beers later, the customer is not just a customer but a good friend. He is Yoruba (born near the Edo border, my ex-girlfriend is Edo) and lives in Gothenburg, Sweden, but the company has staff in Lagos.

To the point:

  1. The official language in Nigeria is English and, with few exceptions (north and south), children learn it well in school.
  2. Some 200 traditional languages ​​are also spoken. Children think they are not cool and mostly stick to English except when talking to Grandma (in most regions, but not all).
  3. Three of the traditional languages ​​- Hausa in the north, Yoruba in the southwest, Igbo in the east - are "recognized."
  4. Everybody knows "Brokin '", which is NOT pidgin. It is a CREOLE language (you can search it on Google). INCORRECT - see issue 3.
  5. Brokin '(Nigerian Creole) is used among people who do not know English (i.e. old or poor) and do not have the same traditional language. EDIT 2: Or who wants to. As one commenter pointed out, it can give a conversation a different feel than English.

I tried to get my girlfriend back then to show me Brokin ', but she refused; even though he grew up in poverty, he felt that Brokin 'was for losers. Sadly, she felt the same for Edo.

However, she taught me some interesting things in Nigerian English:

  • On and off can be verbs. "In that!" is much better than "turn it on!", for example.
  • It's okay to say that something is "more better." Even senators do.
  • There is gas in the kitchen. In most cases, it is an electric gas, but it can be a gas gas.

Also, both my ex (Edo) and my client / friend (Yoruba) tend to lose consonants. I suspect it is because their traditional languages ​​emphasize vowels and use tones. I once spent an hour trying to figure out who my former enemy (enemy) was. It turned out to be his phone.

My mom is a retired English teacher. One of the first things they told him was “there is no English; there are the English. "True.

EDIT: Why do I think it's sad that my ex despises Edo? Edo is also known as Bini, and is the language of the ancient Kingdom of Benin, which, among other things, erected one of the largest structures known to man - the Walls of Benin (parts still visible in Benin City). So in a way, I feel like I should be a proud daughter of the Oba (the king). On the other hand, nationalism and progress have never been friends, so perhaps it is better as it is. Perhaps national pride works best in the history books.

EDIT 3: This is wrong, my information was old or wrong. Now Wikipedia says (in a complicated way) that it is, but mostly, pidgin, and Nigerian commenters say pidgin. My mistake.

Broken English is basically a grammatical inaccuracy. An example is the use of the wrong tense as “I did not 'know'” instead of I did not know.

Pidgin English is a "corruption" of precise English with a local dialect into an intermediate language that is neither English nor the local dialect. The most common example is the language used in Nigeria, which is actually acceptable even in high-level works of literature like Chinua Achebe's. For those who have been to East Africa, especially Kenya, an intermediate language called "Sheng" was born in the late 1990s, involving Swahili and English. This

Keep reading

Broken English is basically a grammatical inaccuracy. An example is the use of the wrong tense as “I did not 'know'” instead of I did not know.

Pidgin English is a "corruption" of precise English with a local dialect into an intermediate language that is neither English nor the local dialect. The most common example is the language used in Nigeria, which is actually acceptable even in high-level works of literature like Chinua Achebe's. For those who have been to East Africa, especially Kenya, an intermediate language called "Sheng" was born in the late 1990s, involving Swahili and English. This language continues to change over time, and since it is used primarily by young people, the structure of sentences and words and their use evolve from time to time. There is no formal or accepted rule of sentence construction or change of words according to use. I can classify "sheng" as "pidgin"

Another difference in usage, albeit a minor one, is that fragmented English can be used by anyone, including those who never attended formal school to learn the language and senior officials, who may not be proficient. But generally informal pidgin and used to define someone's class. Taking the example of the novel A Man from the People of Chinua Achebe, the pidgin is used by vigilantes like Dogo, the one-eyed stalwart of Chief Nanga. Pidgin is also used for euphemism, by all classes of people within a locality in given settings to exclude others or as a euphemism, which is not true for poor English that can show class but is not used to "disinfect "some communication, especially vulgar. .

On a lighter note: if I've broken English in my explanation, you know where to locate me… hehehe!

This is likely to happen for several things:

  1. A talented author writes a very good book in it. It can be a novel, a collection of stories, a long poem, or even a play. Gender doesn't matter, as long as the book is very good. It may even be a translation of a good book from another language, but something original that tells an interesting and honest story about the lives of people who speak this language is the best option. Many languages ​​became important and respected thanks to good books: Dante, Shakespeare, Pushkin, Cervantes, etc. The writer need not worry about non-standard spelling.
Keep reading

This is likely to happen for several things:

  1. A talented author writes a very good book in it. It can be a novel, a collection of stories, a long poem, or even a play. Gender doesn't matter, as long as the book is very good. It may even be a translation of a good book from another language, but something original that tells an interesting and honest story about the lives of people who speak this language is the best option. Many languages ​​became important and respected thanks to good books: Dante, Shakespeare, Pushkin, Cervantes, etc. The writer need not worry about non-standard spelling: the story is much more important at that stage.
  2. An entrepreneur creates a popular news website in this language. It should carry news that people really care about: politics, movie stars, sports, reports from other countries. This entrepreneur should love the language and care about it. When Eliezer Ben-Yehuda began his campaign for the resurgence of the Hebrew language, one of the first things he did was start a simple newspaper. It worked very well.
  3. Elementary schools must have textbooks in this language. In this way children will see that this language is good enough to write respectable books. It will also help them learn, because it will be close to how they actually speak.
  4. You should write a blog in this language. You, whoever you are, if you know this language, go to a free blogging site like WordPress.com or Tumblr and start writing. Show the world that your language is real and can be used for blogging.
  5. I intentionally put the latter: the government can declare it official. However, it is better for the language to grow organically using the above points, rather than by fiat.


I hope that helps.

Oh, and this is relevant to pretty much any language whose speakers want to "update" it.

It is not a matter of belief, it is certainly not my belief about it.

General linguistics has long indicated that the English language is neither Creole nor Pidgin. It identifies it as a language that operates fundamentally along Germanic linguistic patterns, while naturalizing in itself all kinds of linguistic components of other languages.

A pidgin language is a simplified (or grammatically simplified) form of a language (especially when used by a non-native speaker) that arises from linguistic contact between other speakers of the language. Clearly, the English language does not qualify for that score, and overall

Keep reading

It is not a matter of belief, it is certainly not my belief about it.

General linguistics has long indicated that the English language is neither Creole nor Pidgin. It identifies it as a language that operates fundamentally along Germanic linguistic patterns, while naturalizing in itself all kinds of linguistic components of other languages.

A pidgin language is a simplified (or grammatically simplified) form of a language (especially when used by a non-native speaker) that arises from linguistic contact between other speakers of the language. Clearly, the English language doesn't qualify on that score, and general linguistics says so too.

A creole language is a mother tongue formed by the contact of two or more languages ​​through an earlier pidgin stage. Again, this disqualifies the English language, and general linguistics affirms this as well.

It is true that it is quite easy to see English as a Pidgin or Creole language if we base our criteria on such things as language contact and absorption of other elements of the language.

Thanks for the A2A.

Yes. I love Nigerian pidgin. It is the most widely spoken language in the country and has the ethnic and dialectical components of Nigeria in its linguistic makeup. It is one of the sweetest languages ​​in the world and reflects true Nigerian phraseology.

Several positive aspects have been taken to update the pidgin in Nigeria. The entertainment industry in Nigeria is the main exporter of Nigerian Pidgin English at the moment. Music is sung in Pidgin and Nollywood is also creating Pidgin lines in Nigerian movies. is becoming world famous, the BBC has a pidgin version, WAZOBIA FM

Keep reading

Yes. I love Nigerian pidgin. It is the most widely spoken language in the country and has the ethnic and dialectical components of Nigeria in its linguistic makeup. It is one of the sweetest languages ​​in the world and reflects true Nigerian phraseology.

Several positive aspects have been taken to update the pidgin in Nigeria. The entertainment industry in Nigeria is the main exporter of Nigerian Pidgin English at the moment. Music is sung in Pidgin and Nollywood is also creating Pidgin lines in Nigerian movies. It is becoming world famous, the BBC has a pidgin version, WAZOBIA FM and other radio stations are broadcasting with it in Nigeria. The Bible has also been translated into Pidgin, so it is gradually becoming a Nigerian concept that will one day be at the center of communication at national functions in Nigeria. I love it for its Nigerian character and it reconnects Nigerians every time they speak it in the diaspora. It is a national identity of Nigeria.

I suspect its location skews its sample: elite upper-class Africans often grow up far away from their parents' traditional villages and street life. It is not surprising that the son or daughter of a Nigerian or Kenyan doctor or banker, who attended international schools and frequently travels internationally, does not necessarily speak the indigenous languages ​​of their parents or grandparents.

On the other hand, I agree with many of the other Africans posting here: In my years living in Abuja, almost every Nigerian I met spoke at least one tribal language, and often several.

For the African bird

Keep reading

I suspect its location skews its sample: elite upper-class Africans often grow up far away from their parents' traditional villages and street life. It is not surprising that the son or daughter of a Nigerian or Kenyan doctor or banker, who attended international schools and frequently travels internationally, does not necessarily speak the indigenous languages ​​of their parents or grandparents.

On the other hand, I agree with many of the other Africans posting here: In my years living in Abuja, almost every Nigerian I met spoke at least one tribal language, and often several.

However, for Africans of average or lesser wealth, tribal languages ​​are commonly spoken, especially in public places such as markets, where various classes of people interact. I can attest that when I went out for long walks in Nairobi, I rarely heard English. Swahili and other languages ​​were much more common.

In Nigeria, with hundreds of languages ​​spoken in the nation, Pidgin is dominant and the queen's English is not uncommon in public, but if two or more people discover that they share a local language, they may choose that language to talk if everyone present knows. language.

To answer your question, most Africans speak an indigenous language, as well as other more widely spoken languages, often the language of the former colonial country, such as English, French, or Portuguese. Muslims may only know Arabic from the Holy Quran, but many also learn modern Arabic dialects. In fact, Arabic is widely spoken in North Africa.

It's because Italy was formed by Sardinia-Piedmont in 1861, when they conquered other Italian states, but even then Italy still didn't have Rome. In 1866 with Prussia, Italy defeated the Austrian Empire and won the Venice region. In 1870 it was Rome's turn. Italy could not take Rome, because France had a garrison there, but in 1870 the Franco-Prussian war was raging, so France moved its garrison to counter the Prussians. Italy simply took the opportunity to seize it back then, when France was occupied.

You see, Italy was formed in 1861 and only then could they begin to think about colonies.

Keep reading

It's because Italy was formed by Sardinia-Piedmont in 1861, when they conquered other Italian states, but even then Italy still didn't have Rome. In 1866 with Prussia, Italy defeated the Austrian Empire and won the Venice region. In 1870 it was Rome's turn. Italy could not take Rome, because France had a garrison there, but in 1870 the Franco-Prussian war was raging, so France moved its garrison to counter the Prussians. Italy simply took the opportunity to seize it back then, when France was occupied.

You see, Italy was formed in 1861 and only then could they begin to think about colonies. It began in 1869 with the purchase of Assab in Eritrea. While full control of Eritrea was obtained in 1889 after a war with Ethiopia.

The colonization of Somaliland began even later, in 1889. While Libya was conquered in 1912 from the Ottoman Empire.

After some unsuccessful attempts, in 1936 Italy managed to conquer Abyssinia (Ethiopia), but it did not last long, in World War II Italy lost all its colonies.

As you can see, their colonial empire did not last long, only around 80 years. Not to mention, the slave trade had already ended, so they didn't force people to move from one colony to another, especially to a completely new environment like the Americas.

Ezigbo onye Ogbe is a phrase in Igbo.

The Igbo language is the language spoken by one of the major Nigerian tribes, the Ibos.

The phrase can be translated into the sense;

Ezigbo - good

Onye - person

Ogbe: mumu, stupid, not so wise (there are many dialects, so we can tell it will have different meanings).

Usually the person is trying to say that you are not that wise or something like that, that's it!

NB: Ogbe also means something else when you come to Enugu Igbo, and some other dialects might interpret it as boy, associate or something similar.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.