What are the answers to the "introduce yourself" and "tell me about yourself" questions to refresh yourself?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Noah Hawkins



What are the answers to the "introduce yourself" and "tell me about yourself" questions to refresh yourself?

The answer should be short and clear.

That is the first and most important question in most interviews. It is used to judge confidence and communication skills.

It should say "I am xyz", I graduated from xyz, 12th from xyz and 10th from xyz.

My father works as a so-and-so and my mother is a housewife or you can say that her job is that she is also working.

My hobbies are this and that.

Now let's go to what you shouldn't

  1. Never start with "myself xyz". That is a big NO.
  2. just say where you studied what education and use the name of the university or college for graduation and after graduation.
  3. Just because your friend wrote reading books as hobbies and you copied his resume, never mention a hobby you don't have unless you are prepared for a few questions about it.
  4. My name is xyz… ..aaaaa… mmm… haaa. Prepare well about yourself. Don't stop or think or make guessing sounds.

Be confident, keep smiling, and always remember that practice makes perfect.

All the best.

Questions like "tell me about yourself" or "describe yourself" are usually meant to break the ice, from what I've felt. Most people tend to take them so seriously that instead of helping the interviewer break the ice, they freeze! "About me? Well I ..."

  • So the first thing to do is avoid unnecessary anxiety. You could use it in a better way later. Think of it this way: you have a date, let's say, a blind date. You don't know anything about the other person, she doesn't know anything about you either. You just come and sit and you are not talking, what should the other do?
Keep reading

Questions like "tell me about yourself" or "describe yourself" are usually meant to break the ice, from what I've felt. Most people tend to take them so seriously that instead of helping the interviewer break the ice, they freeze! "About me? Well I ..."

  • So the first thing to do is avoid unnecessary anxiety. You could use it in a better way later. Think of it this way: you have a date, let's say, a blind date. You don't know anything about the other person, she doesn't know anything about you either. You just come and sit and you are not talking, what should the other person do? Speak, right? Obviously, what is the point of two people sitting at a table, face to face, with nothing to do or say? And in all likelihood, the first question they will ask you will be: "So, tell me something about yourself."

    The interviewer's intent behind asking you to actually introduce yourself is not all that different.

  • That doesn't mean you won't be judged on what you say here. But it will not be the sort of decisive judgment that the interviewer must make. There is still a long way to go for that to happen yet. So take it easy.

  • Now, think of all the things that really define you and define you in a way that would make a stranger (in this case, a prospective employer) take an interest in you. You could blurt out answers you've read on the internet, but I really don't think that helps you much. You can always ask for more details or explanations in addition to the initial introduction.

  • "I'm a creative person"
    "Oh really, creative like in what? Do you remember an incident where your creativity helped you solve a problem?"
    "..."

  • An answer learned by heart will not allow you to think quickly in that case. Being honest and real, on the other hand, gives you the ability to do so, as it essentially requires you to tell the truth.

    Before the interview, write down all the things that define you: your background, your hobbies, your passions, your activities, your philosophies, your ideologies, your strengths, your weaknesses, your achievements, etc.

    Now, try to figure out which ones will allow a stranger to see an interesting side of you. That is actually what the interviewer hopes to see as well. Try to be unique, diverse and original in the way you express yourself.

    You could say exactly what you read on the internet or from someone else, but saying it in a different way, adding layers to it, can help you stand out.

    For instance:
  • "My biggest weakness is that I am a workaholic." (you wish!)

  • vs.

  • "I don't know if this counts as a weakness or not, but I guess the fact that I love being busy often causes me to miss out on some fun moments with friends and family.

  • I made it up to exemplify the difference you can make to your answers by using words wisely.

  • DO NOT mention personal details like your family history UNLESS the interviewer asks for it. It takes unnecessary time, it may be a detour for some interviewers, it may go against the policy of some companies, and it is not one of the most important things to mention. Then? What's the point of starting on that note?
    Personally, I like to value the interviewer's time and not mention unnecessary information unless he specifically asks for it.

  • Ideally, it could include:
    1. Your name
    2. Your educational history / achievements, both from college and school
    3. Your most significant work experience / achievement
    4. Your hobbies, with more emphasis on your passion (s). You could support the same with an example perhaps.
    5. The things in life / career that matter most to you
    6. Why are you interviewing for your company?
    7. Try to think of a sentence about yourself to finish. Probably the motto of your life
  • Those are the only cases you can choose from. But I really suggest you be original and think for yourself. Be creative, imaginative, and organized.

  • For each adjective you use for yourself, be prepared with some real-life examples. You will hate if you end up wondering and looking around when asked to justify that you are what you said you are. It can be incredibly embarrassing and can make you a lot more nervous ... and it's just the first question so far!
    So if you think you won't be able to spontaneously recall such anecdotes in the actual interview, keep a few handy (in your memory, of course).

  • And oh yeah, don't overstretch it. Speak quality. Cover the most important / interesting things first. Leave it up to the interviewer if you want to ask for more, take off from something you said, or move on to another question.

All recruiters have asked this question almost every time they meet a new candidate. You shake hands, they ask you to sit down. You sit and smile. They ask this question. You begin,

"Hello. My name is ___. I currently work at ____ as ____. My education credentials include ........."

<BORING>

They somehow keep their smile and wait for you to finish while you speak whatever comes to mind at the time.

This is not the correct way to start a conversation.

Rather than a formal introduction, think of your two-minute response as a tool to connect with the interviewer.

Keep reading

All recruiters have asked this question almost every time they meet a new candidate. You shake hands, they ask you to sit down. You sit and smile. They ask this question. You begin,

"Hello. My name is ___. I currently work at ____ as ____. My education credentials include ........."

<BORING>

They somehow keep their smile and wait for you to finish while you speak whatever comes to mind at the time.

This is not the correct way to start a conversation.

Rather than a formal introduction, think of your two-minute response as a tool to build a connection with the interviewer, the company, and the future growth of all parties involved. This is an opportunity to show that you can fit perfectly into the culture. Show that it is interesting. Show your skills.

In all the interviews I have attended, the questions begin with what I mentioned in the part about me.

If you're cooler, make sure everything you've done differently from other candidates shows up at this point.

You can start on the lines of ...

Hi there. I am _____ and I am here as a candidate for position ____ on your team. I will finish my B.XX. on _____ for June 2018. As part of my course, I have worked on a project where we build _____ using ___ and ____. It was a great learning experience both technically and socially, as we had to balance the distribution of work within the team and continually seek guidance from professors and industry experts.

This is the point where you start to highlight your skills and accomplishments.

Other than this, I have represented my colleges in ______ and won the award. I also trained in ______. Apart from these, I usually spend my weekends working at ______ (or playing something, or some volunteer activities). Last week I was on a 50km bike ride which was a great test of strength and endurance.

Finish by pointing out where you are and where you want to go further.

That is all I can share. I am looking for an entry level position at _______ that can give a great start to my career. I will be happy to answer any questions you have.

Make sure this part of the interview is never impromptu. In the meantime, it shouldn't seem overly rehearsed either. You should already have a list of 100 things to share in your mind, of which 10-20 can be shared in the interview depending on the situation.

Whenever we face an interview, the most common question we hear is tell me about yourself or introduce yourself.

To better answer the question, you must first understand why they do it in the first place.

the interviewer is not looking for the trip of a lifetime. Rather, the question is to make you feel comfortable and it is a way for them to relax in the actual interview and get a general idea of ​​who you are.

It is important to remember that while the question is definitely about you, it is also about why you are a good fit for the position. With this in mind, your answer should detail

Keep reading

Whenever we face an interview, the most common question we hear is tell me about yourself or introduce yourself.

To better answer the question, you must first understand why they do it in the first place.

the interviewer is not looking for the trip of a lifetime. Rather, the question is to make you feel comfortable and it is a way for them to relax in the actual interview and get a general idea of ​​who you are.

It is important to remember that while the question is definitely about you, it is also about why you are a good fit for the position. With this in mind, your response should detail experiences relevant to the position you are applying for and highlight you as the perfect candidate. So depending on how you answer, it will help the interviewer decide what to ask next. This is your chance to make a lasting first impression.

If you think this question is complicated, you are not alone. As you prepare for the answer, remember that the key part here is not only describing your personal life, but also your professional one. On that basis, I listed a few points here in two categories

Be sure to give professional and relevant answers to the position for which you are applying. This way you can respond. See the following example for newborns:

  • Hello, my name is Lily Taylor. I am from New Delhi / I am from New Delhi but currently I live in Mumbai.
  • I finished my studies from SND High School in 2015.
  • I graduated from NIT University in 2021 with a BE in Computer Science and Engineering / I completed BE in Computer Science and Engineering from NIT University in 2021.
  • Completed graduation with 87% / Maintained a GPA of 6.
  • As a computer science student, I am passionate about learning new programming languages ​​and am currently good at the Java programming language. During my graduation, I was part of a student-initiated group where we conducted workshops for other students on innovations in the computer industry.
  • In my spare time / free time I like to read books and play cricket.
  • As I come to my family, there are 4 members including me. My father is a teacher and my mother is a housewife. My little brother just showed up in the 12th grade.
  • Well, I don't have any real life work experience, but now I am looking forward to taking advantage of all that I learned and gaining practical experience.
  • Thank you for giving me the opportunity to introduce myself.

If you have experience, you should focus more on explaining past experience effectively because that is what the interviewer is looking for. If you want to check the example to get an experienced one and some other details on how to prepare an answer, you can watch my video where I provided some other details.

So these two examples are simple, short but the most effective at the same time. Hope this is helpful to you at least to leave a lasting first impression.

When I was preparing for the interviews, this was the most difficult and time-consuming question to prepare. This will be asked of you first in any job interview you request.

Framing a short, impressive answer takes time. I had read many examples on the internet and on Quora before deciding what to tell an interviewer about me.

Generally, a good response is something that should take about 2 to 5 minutes. You have to judge how much time the interviewer is willing to spend on this question. For ex. During my interview with Goldman Sachs, the interviewer asked me to explain in

Keep reading

When I was preparing for the interviews, this was the most difficult and time-consuming question to prepare. This will be asked of you first in any job interview you request.

Framing a short, impressive answer takes time. I had read many examples on the internet and on Quora before deciding what to tell an interviewer about me.

Generally, a good response is something that should take about 2 to 5 minutes. You have to judge how much time the interviewer is willing to spend on this question. For ex. During my interview with Goldman Sachs, the interviewer asked me to explain in 2 minutes while, at McKinsey, the interviewers were not in such a rush.

So it all depends.

Points to remember when describing yourself:

  1. It is not necessary to repeat every point on your resume.
  2. Divide the answer into parts.
    1. If you are just out of college, start with the name of your college and the CPI (if it's worth mentioning). Then mention your values ​​as you used to say in this line: "I believe that I am a diligent person and setting personal goals and achieving them gives me an immense sense of satisfaction."
    2. Then I would talk about my internships / projects and the skills I acquired from them. Skills like working in a challenging environment, etc. along with technical skills.
    3. I would then add my PORs, extracurriculars, sports experience, hobbies, etc., which are not mentioned on my resume, and a summary attached to any experiences.
  3. Remember to always tell the truth. Interviewers are much smarter than you. A counter question that is not answered properly can leave a negative impact during interviews.
  4. It is up to you to mold your prepared response and present it in front of the interviewer. For ex. Tech profiles don't want to know about your extracurricular activities and would be more interested in learning about your programming skills and projects. Consulting profiles would like to know your multifaceted side. So know your role and then prepare yourself.
  5. Also, try to focus on saying things that are not on your resume and mention the skills you learned from that particular experience.
  6. Practice this in front of the mirror no more than 2 to 3 times before the interview. You don't have to clutter it up like you used to do on school days. It should come out naturally.

All the best!

PS: There is no set rule for describing yourself during interviews. You can talk about yourself in any way that makes you appear confident and prepared for the interview. I had done a lot of research myself while preparing the correct answer for myself. So take your time!

I interviewed Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, Flipkart, Franklin Templeton and deleted them all. I have worked with all of these companies.

I gave more than 70 interviews in large and small companies, in India and the US, in a very exhausting job search process after my MS. After that, I took three breaks in my career and interviewed many more companies. Names include Walmart Labs, Target, InMobi, CA Technologies, Karvy, Open Text, Mindtree, BCG, Intellecap, Directi, Leo Burnett, IMRB, Nielsen.

I didn't usually clarify interviews when I started giving them, but with better skills and inte

Keep reading

I interviewed Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, Flipkart, Franklin Templeton and deleted them all. I have worked with all of these companies.

I gave more than 70 interviews in large and small companies, in India and the US, in a very exhausting job search process after my MS. After that, I took three breaks in my career and interviewed many more companies. Names include Walmart Labs, Target, InMobi, CA Technologies, Karvy, Open Text, Mindtree, BCG, Intellecap, Directi, Leo Burnett, IMRB, Nielsen.

I didn't use to clarify interviews when I started giving them, but with better interview skills and insight over the years, I have clarified each and every interview I've given in the last 3 years, in part because I've become very selective. with whom I interview. I received offers from Target, Open Text, InMobi, and a few others, but I accepted them from companies I've worked with.

Here are some of the best practices that I recommend using for presentations:

  1. Don't start with your name. The interviewer already knows.
  2. Don't say where you are from in the next sentence. The interviewer may not know the town / city where most of us come from. Focus on passing on your work history.
  3. I like to start with an informal word, like "then." The idea is to keep the conversation going and not make it look like you've recited a paragraph. This is not a living school. Other words could be 'safe', 'good'.
  4. Start with what you are currently doing.
  5. Then mention your last most recent experience.
  6. Use "I" or "we" as it was. If you lead the project you are talking about and guided your stakeholders, use 'me'. If the project was led by someone else, use "we". Be clear from which position of responsibility you were operating.
  7. Just highlight one important thing that you want to highlight or that is unique to each job.
  8. Then mention more past experiences, if any.
  9. You do not need to reveal your entire history if it is too long. Just talk about the jobs relevant to this job, but mention that you worked in another similar domain before for X years.
  10. Many of us have the urge to say everything in the introduction, don't do that. If you made a career change, you don't have to go into detail in the introduction. Save it for a later question.
  11. You can mention roughly how long you worked at a particular company. I refrain from that, instead I like to give more importance to what I worked on.
  12. Mention your impressive titles.

Here's my introduction during the LinkedIn interviews, which is my current job. So I was working with Flipkart.

That is why I currently work with Flipkart as a Senior User Researcher. Your payment page is my competition. I recently worked on their co-branded card with Axis Bank. Prior to this, I worked with Google as part of their Next Billion Users (NBU) team at GPay. It was a product made for India, for new Internet users, so I did a lot of research in Tier 2 cities. Before that, I worked with Microsoft on a combination of design and research functions. I was working on Visio, an enterprise diagramming product. I was previously a data analyst for a few years at Franklin Templeton and a few other companies. I have a couple of master's degrees from the University of Illinois and the National Institute of Fashion Technology.

If you are a student and don't have much experience to talk about, here is another presentation of me when I was changing careers. Back then I was mainly pitching myself into my career and personal projects. I remember this particular interview at CA Technologies for a UX position where I impressed the interviewer. He was very positive with me and said, 'I see you've been using your time very well.'

My last job was at Franklin Templeton Investments, where I worked as a data analyst. Before that, I did a master's degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I studied advertising. Research courses were part of the program and I did some projects around design research. I worked at Franklin Templeton for two and a half years. However, I realized that that field was not for me and I did not enjoy working in an Analytics role. So over the past year, I have invested time in working on what interests me. I've done some self-projects in design, one on ABC and one on XYZ. the XYZ was made for a start-up. ABC was approximately ____ (one line) and XYZ was approximately ____ (one line).

Important note: My self-projects are usually very detailed and I support them with a portfolio, making them very real, not just something I am talking about.

The lessons are the same here, except for these additional ones:

  1. If you are not currently doing anything, start with 'My last job was ...'
  2. Come straight to your education and what specific course you studied that prepared you for the job you are applying for.
  3. Then mention any tiny work experience. It could be in college, in a startup, in the past.
  4. Please indicate why you are interested in this position. Are you passionate about this field? Or were you in a different field that didn't work for you? Do you find this interesting? The answer should be unique to you, as it has the potential to give you an advantage over other applicants.
  5. Tell the interviewer how you developed your skill set: self-projects, reading, hackathon, did you create anything? Show them samples.

With this crisp introduction, you've given the interviewer enough material to ask for more. Now pause and let them do their work.


Answer questions in comments / DM: My self-projects can be found on my Medium profile where I write about my profession. If you look at the older articles, you will find 5 to 6 projects of your own.

For those of you wondering how to recover from your career hiatus, I took advantage of Linkedin every time to find a job. Here are answers on this:

Anshul Agarwal's response to Has LinkedIn helped you get a job? If so, do you have any advice?

Anshul Agarwal's response to How do I find a job on LinkedIn?

Anshul Agarwal's response to How do I find a job on LinkedIn?

Thanks for A2A Saan Choudhary

So, I'm Poorva Singh, let's get started.

  1. I am 5'4 feet tall.
  2. I am good at studies.
  3. I love to dance.
  4. I am Potterhead.
  5. I had dumb friends. (Last)
  6. I like to write poems.
  7. I study in class 9.
  8. I want to be an IAS officer.
  9. I am proud to be an Indian.
  10. I don't like to gossip.
  11. I am a charlatan.
  12. I love being alone.
  13. I like pizza.
  14. I like to cook western dishes.
  15. I am a frustrated class monitor.
  16. I like my current friends.
  17. I like to play basketball.
  18. I like cozy houses.
  19. I love to sleep.
  20. I love reading books.
  21. I'm great at philosophy because I spent many hours talking to my mom.
  22. I like trendy dresses.
Keep reading

Thanks for A2A Saan Choudhary

So, I'm Poorva Singh, let's get started.

  1. I am 5'4 feet tall.
  2. I am good at studies.
  3. I love to dance.
  4. I am Potterhead.
  5. I had dumb friends. (Last)
  6. I like to write poems.
  7. I study in class 9.
  8. I want to be an IAS officer.
  9. I am proud to be an Indian.
  10. I don't like to gossip.
  11. I am a charlatan.
  12. I love being alone.
  13. I like pizza.
  14. I like to cook western dishes.
  15. I am a frustrated class monitor.
  16. I like my current friends.
  17. I like to play basketball.
  18. I like cozy houses.
  19. I love to sleep.
  20. I love reading books.
  21. I'm great at philosophy because I spent many hours talking to my mom.
  22. I like trendy dresses.
  23. I don't believe in fashion followed by wierdos.
  24. I am a mix of Ginny, Hermoine and Luna.
  25. If you couldn't understand 24, then I don't know you.
  26. I can talk endlessly about Harry Potter.
  27. I love J. K Rowling
  28. I am happy with my life.
  29. I am a good listener.
  30. I am a genuine advisor.
  31. I love talking to the elderly about their life.

That is all . I can't think anymore.

These are basic

  • I love my parents .
  • I love my family.
  • I don't give a damn what other people think of me.

.

.

Thank you for reading

.

Love love ❤️❤️

When asking yourself this question, be sure to avoid saying anything that is already on your resume. The most common confusion is between "tell me something about yourself" and "give me a summary of your resume."
When an interviewer asks you to "run with me through your resume", it means that you have not gone through your CV and you have to tell him what is your on your cv.
Where as tell me something about yourself is to let the interviewer know what is not your on your CV This question is basically asked to find out how confident you are. Some basic things, like telling your family history,

Keep reading

When asking yourself this question, be sure to avoid saying anything that is already on your resume. The most common confusion is between "tell me something about yourself" and "give me a summary of your resume."
When an interviewer asks you to "run with me through your resume", it means that you have not gone through your CV and you have to tell him what is your on your cv.
Where as tell me something about yourself is to let the interviewer know what is not your on your CV This question is basically asked to find out how confident you are. Some basic things, like telling about your family background, your strength, do not expose your weaknesses in advance, instead try to say diplomatically how you have worked on your weakness.

I'll just tell you a short incident, my friend went to a mock interview, the interviewer asked him, so Mr. X tells me something about you and starts by saying that my name is Mr. X. Now this is a very small mistake, but it makes a big difference, the interviewer already knows your name.

An interview is not a good time to take a lot of risks unless you are applying for a creative job and expecting risky responses. The best plan is to be crisp, factual, and embellish your presentation with humor or a story.

Keep in mind that the interview is likely to last between 30 and 40 minutes and that the interviewer has an agenda that he needs to compete. You must answer the questions that are asked, then you can add information or tell an inside story.

Plan a 3-5 minute summary if requested. Talk about where you grew up and what schools you attended. Briefly review your work experience. If you don't have a lot of work experience

Keep reading

An interview is not a good time to take a lot of risks unless you are applying for a creative job and expecting risky responses. The best plan is to be crisp, factual, and embellish your presentation with humor or a story.

Keep in mind that the interview is likely to last between 30 and 40 minutes and that the interviewer has an agenda that he needs to compete. You must answer the questions that are asked, then you can add information or tell an inside story.

Plan a 3-5 minute summary if requested. Talk about where you grew up and what schools you attended. Briefly review your work experience. If you don't have a lot of work experience, talk about a specific class that inspired you to pursue this line of work. Describe how you were introduced to this company and why you are interested in the job. Try to be quick and brief. 3-5 minutes maximum and only if you are asked to introduce yourself.

If you want to be more "interesting", talk about your passions and motivations. What brought you here and why are you excited to interview this company? What about work that intrigues you? Again, keep it short and to the point.

Remember that "introduce yourself" is a brilliant opportunity to frame your experience in a good light and set the agenda for the interview. Suppose they will ask the question and are ready. If you want to be “interesting,” prepare carefully, be personal, and use your humor, but answer the question directly.

Q: Tell me about yourself:

They are looking for ways to eliminate him as a candidate. Don't let them eliminate you! Move on to the next round of interviews! The secret is to give a short and acceptable answer, with safe material that will not inadvertently get you removed. Then give them the reasons why you are the candidate they should select. I give more details in my video. I hope that helps!

Q: Tell me about yourself:

This is a great question to ask yourself. It is an excuse to explain how you meet all the posted job requirements.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.