What are some reputable or well paid coding contests for coders (eg GSoC, FB Hacker Cup, etc)?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Ruby Powell



What are some reputable or well paid coding contests for coders (eg GSoC, FB Hacker Cup, etc)?

  • https://icpc.baylor.edu/
  • Google Code Jam
  • 2016 Google APAC College Graduate Test (Not sure prize money, but a good ranking provides an interview opportunity for Google (mainly Mountain View))
  • Facebook Hacker Cup
  • International Computing Olympiad (Not sure prize money, but highly reputable competition)
  • The International Obfuscated C-Code Contest (I'm not sure about the prize money, but it's too much fun to see the way they have coded and something one might not be able to figure out after seeing only 2-5 lines of codes, as he's too dazed)

FYI: GSoC is not a coding competition.

It depends.

Assuming you know the difference between a coder, a programmer, and a developer, I would say that a top100 coder is not always a good industrial developer.

  1. They don't necessarily know how to write code that lasts at least 5 years.
  2. They don't necessarily know how to write code that someone else understands. They generally don't comment on their default programming style or provide documentation. They also find it difficult to read their peers' code without judging and analyzing.
  3. They don't necessarily know how to design, design, and write more than 500 lines of code. In TC it is'
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It depends.

Assuming you know the difference between a coder, a programmer, and a developer, I would say that a top100 coder is not always a good industrial developer.

  1. They don't necessarily know how to write code that lasts at least 5 years.
  2. They don't necessarily know how to write code that someone else understands. They generally don't comment on their default programming style or provide documentation. They also find it difficult to read their peers' code without judging and analyzing.
  3. They don't necessarily know how to design, design, and write more than 500 lines of code. In TC it is just a function; in ACM ICPC it is just one file.
  4. They don't necessarily know a lot about using external libraries or open source tools when it comes to finding cost-effective and reliable solutions to industrial problems. For the most part, they prefer to write it themselves from scratch rather than relying on others.
  5. They have deep performance concerns in mind by default, as fast execution is always a factor in most programming challenges. Fast sometimes means making your code super dirty and dirty so that it runs 10% faster and is ACCEPTED, not an algorithmic improvement. So if "maintainability" is more of a concern for a team of 100+ developers working remotely on an MM line size code base, things like What are some cool manipulation tricks / tricks? bits? they are not really useful.
  6. Not all problems in the industry are solved 10 in 5 hours. You will have days, weeks, or months to do your job.
  7. Not all top100 encoders are team players. Even ACM-ICPC teams are sometimes 3-tank solving individually. (And win!) Most of the good guys are introverts (10 years of experience dealing with them says so) and it's not easy for them to have efficient communication and explain their thoughts in a non-technical way. It's going to be a bigger problem in the industry when you have to explain your solution to a PM with no IT experience who only cares about time / money efficiency.
  8. They will get bored if you don't feed them challenging problems often. And that doesn't always happen in life.
  9. If the company itself is not among the 100 most popular companies in the valley, it will be very difficult for them to maintain the loyalty of these candidates.

That said, not everyone needs them. And it's a risk to hire someone like that if you don't have problems that only they can solve!

The good news is that big companies always have the money, the brand, the benefits, the time, and everything they need to take this risk and hire them. This is why if you are in the TC Top 100 or an ACM ICPC World Finalist, you will most likely be contacted by Google or FB recruiters frequently. And yes, after having a gold seal from one of these great brands on your resume as proof of industrial experience, you will receive even more opportunities down the road.

However, for the OP: if you are not there yet, if you are not passionate about problem solving just because of the feeling you get every time you see "Yes, AC!", And if your goal is to simply get hired for good or best companies, this path is one of the worst to take. Go learn Software development.

Edit: And from some perspectives it sucks. Aideen NasiriShargh's answer to What Sucks About Competitive Programming? Why is it better to do real world programming?

Ok, let me try to answer from a new perspective (existing answers are negative):

Practically, I think it can be worth it, as long as you enjoy coding contests.

I received full-time offers from both Facebook and Google. I would say that 70% of the questions asked are closely related to competitive programming problems. Many of them are algorithm problems (telephone and whiteboard interviews). Sorry, I would disagree with the Venn diagram in another answer.

I spent quite a bit of time (compared to my peers) on competitive programming. HOWEVER, I feel that receiving offers from these great companies is more

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Ok, let me try to answer from a new perspective (existing answers are negative):

Practically, I think it can be worth it, as long as you enjoy coding contests.

I received full-time offers from both Facebook and Google. I would say that 70% of the questions asked are closely related to competitive programming problems. Many of them are algorithm problems (telephone and whiteboard interviews). Sorry, I would disagree with the Venn diagram in another answer.

I spent quite a bit of time (compared to my peers) on competitive programming. HOWEVER, I feel like getting offers from these big companies is more of a by-product to me; I really enjoy coding contests and I enjoy the satisfaction when a tricky problem is solved during / during contests. So in my case, I didn't spend time practicing for coding contests in order to get an offer from some big company; rather, I participated in coding contests because I enjoy the process itself.

However, as a final observation, the skill set to be a successful and productive software engineer is quite different from what you need to do well in programming contests. You don't have to be a red scrambler or complete the first few rounds at Google Code Jam or Hacker Cup to get an offer from big companies like Google or Facebook.

See also
: Where do people get the idea that competitive programming is very important to a successful career? Where does the idea come from and why is it spreading?
- Does having a very low TopCoder rating make someone unemployed? My current rating is 1196 (high green). Every time they put me in division 1, I can't solve the problems, but the two times they put me in division 2, I got the highest score in the room.
- What steps should I take to be an excellent web developer without having to do competitive programming?

Among the top tier companies that were hiring this year, I applied to few, and for the most part, the interviews were easy for me due to my strength in competitive scheduling. However, whether I was actually hired has no correlation with that.

  • First, I received referrals from several seniors and friends because they knew I was good at algorithms and data structures. Also, I was able to fill a space on my resume with compliments from the contest, which made for a solid resume.
  • If you see the kinds of problems that good sports programming competitions have and compare them to the interview questions,
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Among the top tier companies that were hiring this year, I applied to few, and for the most part, the interviews were easy for me due to my strength in competitive scheduling. However, whether I was actually hired has no correlation with that.

  • First, I received referrals from several seniors and friends because they knew I was good at algorithms and data structures. Also, I was able to fill a space on my resume with compliments from the contest, which made for a solid resume.
  • If you look at the kinds of problems that good sports programming competitions have and compare them to interview questions, you will see that interview problems are the most common problems that no one will bring up in a contest.
  • However, some companies have given me very good problems and it was fun to solve them. Once again, being good at these contests ensured that I had that kind of algorithmic thinking and thought process necessary to find a solution or the correct approach to the problem.
  • Over time, my programming skills have improved considerably. Now when I look back at my previous presentations, I can clearly see how I could have avoided all that spaghetti code, how I can restructure the code to make it more readable. Now I can write code with less frequent and logical errors. I have a good command of C ++, knowing the complexities and characteristics of the language.
  • I have developed the ability to express my solutions and thought process to the interviewer, which I gained through various discussions I had with my teammates and friends while practicing and solving contests.
  • Sometimes it is a good topic of conversation in an interview :)

Of course there are some drawbacks too, like the interviewer might judge you and think you don't have good experience in real world software development and real world problem solving, or you may have a complicated approach at times. than required for a problem. from your previous experience in coding contests.

Follow my space exploration with Lalit Kundu for more such content.

I have tried only codechef and hackerearth, so I can share a few steps for beginners to get started with these sites:
The first thing you need to learn is standard input / output in the programming language you know.
If you are starting with codechef:
go to the practice area, then go to easy problems. These problems are sorted in newer to older format and in my experience older problems are easier so I would suggest trying asking a question from the bottom up. Go to the last problem, try to solve it on your own. After spending 5-6 hours if you still can't figure it out, there is a great function in

Keep reading

I have tried only codechef and hackerearth, so I can share a few steps for beginners to get started with these sites:
The first thing you need to learn is standard input / output in the programming language you know.
If you are starting with codechef:
Go to the practice area, then go to the easy problems. These problems are sorted in newer to older format and in my experience older problems are easier so I would suggest trying asking a question from the bottom up. Go to the last problem, try to solve it on your own. After spending 5-6 hours if you still can't figure it out, there is a great function in codechef to see other solutions. Go to all shipments and select your language and select the accepted solution and search for it. You will get a list of the accepted solution. Go through Solution 3-4 and combine with your solution, you will spot problems with your code. If you could solve any problem on your own, I will still suggest you to check others solution. It can lead to a new concept or another way to solve that problem.
If you are starting with hackerearth:
go to the practice area, then order the problems according to solving them by. Select an easier problem (which has a higher number of 'Solve by and higher precision. The additional process is the same as codechef. I will suggest
that you don't jump into the live challenges until you solve at least 100 practice problems by your account without referring to the solution.

I am a Code-Mentor and I teach coding to hundreds of students. It has been observed through our statistics collected through walking time that students who spend 6-8 hours a day coding do very well on their projects and develop their skills quickly.

If you want to track your coding activity, you can use this W-Metrics for developers tool generated automatically from your coding activity and install the plugin in your IDEs. It will keep track of your daily and weekly coding hours, including the languages ​​and projects you have been working on. Also by sharing some statistics from the public leaderboard, you can see the t

Keep reading

I am a Code-Mentor and I teach coding to hundreds of students. It has been observed through our statistics collected through walking time that students who spend 6-8 hours a day coding do very well on their projects and develop their skills quickly.

If you want to track your coding activity, you can use this W-Metrics for developers tool generated automatically from your coding activity and install the plugin in your IDEs. It will keep track of your daily and weekly coding hours, including the languages ​​and projects you have been working on. Also, by sharing some statistics from the public leaderboard, you can see the world's top and famous developers spending 8-12 hours a day on coding, but this is only possible if you enjoy it. If you like coding, you can install this and also compete with others, or set daily / weekly goals for yourself. This will push your encoding limits.

WakaTime Leaderboard - Some of the best coders are renowned developers who spend 8-12 hours coding a day.

Additionally, we are using this tool to keep track of the hours spent with our students. Those who dedicate 5 to 8 hours a day are doing very well and are building big projects.

A report from Pandora Batch - Android Development Course on Coding Blocks.

An Elixir Batch Report - Web Development Course Using Node JS at Coding Blocks

I hope it helps :)

Greetings

Prateek Narang

Founder member

Coding blocks

If you search for coding club on LinkedIn, you will find that this course has changed many lives. You might be thinking that I'm just any person promoting the coding mob, but that's not true, no problem, don't trust me, but you can't deny the facts. The coding environment they provide is very efficient and that is one of the important factors in my opinion to instill the true essence of learning. Have you ever seen somewhere that during the first week of joining students can solve 100+ questions on coding platforms like leetcode and codechef? The coding of the mafia is one of the most positive

Keep reading

If you search for coding club on LinkedIn, you will find that this course has changed many lives. You might be thinking that I'm just any person promoting the coding mob, but that's not true, no problem, don't trust me, but you can't deny the facts. The coding environment they provide is very efficient and that is one of the important factors in my opinion to instill the true essence of learning. Have you ever seen somewhere that during the first week of joining students can solve 100+ questions on coding platforms like leetcode and codechef? Coding mafia is one of the most positive reviewed courses for ds and something. You can google it if you don't trust me. Students who did not know 'd' of data structures and algorithms are now working in large multinationals such as Google, Amazon, Adobe, Jivox, Facebook, Directi, Flipkart, Uber, Microsoft, etc. Mr. Rishabh, the founder of Coding Club, is the mentor for this course. He has more than 9 years of experience teaching and changing the lives of students. He will teach you those tricks that no one would tell you because he has learned those things from his past experience. It has been a real inspiration for the students. He has always supported his students who tried to forge a better version of themselves. In the end I just want to say that this decision was the best decision of the students who enrolled in this course. It has been a real inspiration for the students. He has always supported his students who tried to forge a better version of themselves. In the end I just want to say that this decision was the best decision of the students who enrolled in this course. It has been a real inspiration for the students. He has always supported his students who tried to forge a better version of themselves. In the end I just want to say that this decision was the best decision of the students who enrolled in this course.

Why do tech companies run coding contests?

It is an easy way to recruit. I know the best players in the Hacker Cup who received full-time offers on Facebook. I interviewed on Google for my participation in Code Jam.

If Microsoft doesn't want to host a coding contest, then they won't, and there's nothing the competitive coding community can really do about it except get a lot of competitive programmers to work at Microsoft and convince them. upper level management that this is a good idea for them.

Here are a few:

  • Google Code Jam
  • Facebook Hacker Cup
  • Upper encoder open
  • SnackDown 2016 | CodeChef

The Imagine Cup You Can Join For Free is the only thing I know of. They started in September for the year 2015. It is more in the line of technological innovation, but there are coding and application challenges. When I first saw your question, I thought you wanted to challenge "Me" to a coding competition, in which case I would throw in the towel. I am not the biggest supporter of Microsoft. I think your OS is too concerned with visual appeal and doesn't have enough functionality.

These are the top coding contests.

  1. ACM-ICPC
  2. Google code jam

There are several coding contests that are held regularly on platforms like Codechef, codeforces, hackerearth, hackerrank, top coder, etc.

Other Guides:


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