What are some of the things I can do to prepare myself to be the best employee I can be by accepting a new job?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Arian Acevedo



What are some of the things I can do to prepare myself to be the best employee I can be by accepting a new job?

People don't know much about you when you join a company. There is no precedent, you are a stranger. It doesn't matter what reputation you had before. Now you can shape your own new identity. The first 90 days will prepare you for the rest of your career at that company. Have lunch with everyone.
> “Relationships are all there is. Everything in the universe only exists because it is in relation to everything else. Nothing exists in isolation. We have to stop pretending that we are individual ...

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Get to work early and early to every meeting

Whenever you are asked how you are doing, respond with the words "I've never been better." That is the ONLY answer to that question. Say it sincerely and with a real smile. Every time. Without exceptions.

Stand up and look everyone in the eye when you speak to them

Dress better than your peers. Dress for promotion. Look like the manager and they will make you the manager.

You will never ever be seen walking around with a cup of coffee in hand. That's the mark of loafers. Bring your laptop, a leather binder with a notebook, or a small tool. That's what worker

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Get to work early and early to every meeting

Whenever you are asked how you are doing, respond with the words "I've never been better." That is the ONLY answer to that question. Say it sincerely and with a real smile. Every time. Without exceptions.

Stand up and look everyone in the eye when you speak to them

Dress better than your peers. Dress for promotion. Look like the manager and they will make you the manager.

You will never ever be seen walking around with a cup of coffee in hand. That's the mark of loafers. Bring your laptop, a leather binder with a notebook, or a small tool. This is what workers and managers look like.

Listen before you speak. Don't wait to speak. If you need time to think, repeat the question.

You will never ever be seen with your hands in your pocket. That's the mark of a bum.

Don't be a watch watcher. Never be the first person to leave the office at night

Listen to gossip but keep your mouth shut. If you get a reputation for being silent, people will come up to you to talk and you will learn a lot. If you get a reputation for being a loudmouth, people will avoid you

Never, never overdo it. In any case, underestimate a problem or problem

Don't present problems without proposing solutions. They hired you to solve problems.

Determine who are the important people you need to meet at all levels and take her out to lunch. Invite a different person for lunch each week. You pay. Be nice. Get to know them and their opinions on work, company, culture, politics, everything. Always drive straight up. You must earn the respect of your peers, but you want to be in contact and in discussions with superiors whenever possible. Don't act over yourself. Listen more than you talk, but be in your circle. When they get used to you, they will expect you to be there with them. They will eventually make you one of them.

Learn to play golf. Nothing you can do is more important than being a golfer in a company where golf is important. In general, being able to play golf is as good as having an MBA. Being able to play golf well is as good as having an MBA from Harvard.

Forget learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade instead

Never say no to anything, even if you know it's not possible. Yes, the problem to the death while raising the important points about the probability of failure. People who say they are not viewed as negative. Say yes even if you want to find a way not to.

Never say you will try. People who tell you that they are going to try are telling you that they plan to fail.

Never whine or complain. Find something good to say about everything, no matter how bad the situation is. They hired you to solve problems, don't become a problem that needs to be solved

Say what you gon do and then do what you said you would do

Do the job no one else wants to do

Always learn something new whenever possible

If the company pays for college classes or additional training, sign up. It will pay huge dividends for years to come.

Don't eat smelly food at your desk and if you must eat at your desk, take it down before and after.

Don't trust or trust your co-workers until you really know them.

Don't interrupt people when they speak, even if you already know what they are going to say.

Remember your three priorities at work. The first is to increase revenue and improve profitability. That's why they hired you. The second is to make your boss always look good. The third is always, without exception, to present a positive attitude.

As a selfish supplement, consider buying my book. "Lessons in Success from Failure" by Jay Howard on Amazon for more information on how to be successful at work.

We change jobs because we want to:

  • a change for the simple fact of doing it,
  • to escape from our current job / workplace that we don't like for some reason (boredom, culture / politics, bosses or our colleagues), or
  • for recognition in terms of salary (a raise) or for a promotion / to diversify our experience.

Things to keep in mind, or better yet, to keep in mind, when changing jobs include:

  • Before you even apply, ask for a copy of the job description, ask about salary, and do some basic research on the company. If any of this does not meet your needs, please do not apply. Otherwise you're just wasting yourself
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We change jobs because we want to:

  • a change for the simple fact of doing it,
  • to escape from our current job / workplace that we don't like for some reason (boredom, culture / politics, bosses or our colleagues), or
  • for recognition in terms of salary (a raise) or for a promotion / to diversify our experience.

Things to keep in mind, or better yet, to keep in mind, when changing jobs include:

  • Before you even apply, ask for a copy of the job description, ask about salary, and do some basic research on the company. If any of this does not meet your needs, please do not apply. Otherwise, you are just wasting your time and business by continuing.
  • reputation and seniority of the new company. Find out their story and everything you can online. You don't want to join a place that is new / may close in 6 months, or has a lot of current and negative reviews online.
  • The values ​​and culture of the company. You'll need to judge this based on the online employee reviews you can find (how many and how recent) and then primarily on your gut based on the hiring process, the people you meet, and what you observe. Also ask about culture in the interview. Your "gut" should tell you if this is the kind of place that suits you / feels right for you. Also remember that if your experience or the people you know is so positive that it seems "too good to be true," it probably is. Some companies are good at maintaining a positive online presence and putting on a staffing show, but the reality is that when you start out, the culture can be quite different and not in a good way.
  • The terms and conditions (T&C) of employment. If you are offered the job, only sign and accept if you are satisfied with the T&C, within reason. If the written offer is not what was offered verbally or has terms that are less favorable than what you have now, ask if your concerns and they will be addressed in writing. If not, decline the offer. Do not sign based on verbal promises as they mean nothing and are unlikely to be changed later.

You should not do anything special. On the other hand, you should always know when this is happening. People go to interviews for three main reasons:

1. They are looking for a new job
2. They are curious to know what is new in the market
3. They want to try the hiring process of other companies

For the first category of people, there is not much you can do. Anyone player will try to discuss / fix things before looking for another job. Even when bad things happen, they try to clear up misunderstandings. So basically when someone is looking for a job without any warning signs, they are doing their organizing.

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You should not do anything special. On the other hand, you should always know when this is happening. People go to interviews for three main reasons:

1. They are looking for a new job
2. They are curious to know what is new in the market
3. They want to try the hiring process of other companies

For the first category of people, there is not much you can do. Anyone player will try to discuss / fix things before looking for another job. Even when bad things happen, they try to clear up misunderstandings. So basically, when someone is looking for a job without any red flags, they are doing their organization a huge favor. Some people may state that they are afraid to talk about problems, as they do not want to be fired. When you're fair and consistent, you know that sucks, so that's okay.

Your exhibition is in the second category. These people are usually outstanding players and you really want them to check out the opportunities. You don't want people on your team that other companies aren't fighting for. You want these people to go to interviews, come back and say, heck, there's no better company on earth. These interviews will motivate them even more and allow them to identify new development opportunities for their organization. It's their biggest exposure because they could actually find much better opportunities. Your company will not be the best from day one, therefore, you must reward the people who do not chase the other opportunity, but stay with you to build the best company in the world. Actions are a very good reward. Again, these people will always tell you;

I suppose you are not talking about the third category, but it is something that you should do yourself, your teammates or your best players A. Get to know your competition, find out about their opportunities, take another step.

  • Arrive early to work consistently; never show up for work late.
  • Know the names of your coworkers and their roles in the organization.
  • Ask lots of questions (but not in an annoying way ...). Make sure you understand your boss's expectations for you!
  • IF something is not clear, say so! The only stupid question is the one you don't ask ...
  • Review your job description (you should have one ... if you don't ask why it hasn't been made available to you yet, as this is a sign that your organization is not well managed).
  • Read the HR policies so you don't inadvertently cross a line.
  • Ask your co-workers about the "unwritten rule
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  • Arrive early to work consistently; never show up for work late.
  • Know the names of your coworkers and their roles in the organization.
  • Ask lots of questions (but not in an annoying way ...). Make sure you understand your boss's expectations for you!
  • IF something is not clear, say so! The only stupid question is the one you don't ask ...
  • Review your job description (you should have one ... if you don't ask why it hasn't been made available to you yet, as this is a sign that your organization is not well managed).
  • Read the HR policies so you don't inadvertently cross a line.
  • Ask your coworkers about "unwritten rules" (all organizations have them) so you don't inadvertently cross over.
  • Stay busy.
  • Don't gossip.
  • Do not use company email for personal use.
  • Do not use the company's Internet for personal use (some companies control Internet use and you may have trouble navigating retail sites, porn sites, etc.).
  • Make sure you understand the paid time off policies. In some companies, you are not allowed to use the accrued time until the trial period has passed, which could be 6 months after the start date.
  • Keep your cell phone SILENCED in a desk drawer or tote bag. Use your phone during recess or lunch time.
  • Spend the quit time to get a feel for the place by chatting with your coworkers and your supervisor.
  • Be polite, always (that means you won't curse).

Yes, some of these items may seem a bit "old-fashioned". But a workplace is just that: a place where you offer your services to your employer, who in turn pays you for your expertise. You are at work to do a job. Keep that idea "front and center" and you will be fine.

Michael Tefula @michaeltefula: Would you ever enter a career knowing that you have very little chance of success? How would you prepare financially for it?

ANSWER:

Every change is scary. Entering a new relationship has little chance of success. Starting a new job. States in motion. Go to a meeting with new people that you have to convince to like you. Every new thing I have to try scares me. But how many times does one change one's career in life? More than you might think? How many times do we step out, jump off the building without seeing the net that is waiting to catch us?

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Michael Tefula @michaeltefula: Would you ever enter a career knowing that you have very little chance of success? How would you prepare financially for it?

ANSWER:

Every change is scary. Entering a new relationship has little chance of success. Starting a new job. States in motion. Go to a meeting with new people that you have to convince to like you. Every new thing I have to try scares me. But how many times does one change one's career in life? More than you might think? How many times do we take the step, we jump out of the building without seeing the net that awaits us to catch us. The network is always there. We just can't see it the moment we jump.

I changed careers once. I wanted to go from being an internet investor (which hadn't worked well for me in 2000-2002 and I went broke) to investing in hedge funds and day trading.

My chances of success were slim or nil. But at the time I loved it. I wanted to do it. I was getting too depressed, bankrupt, and losing my home. I had to get up off the ground and do something. There are always ways to increase the chances. Every day you can do something new to increase your chances, to lay the foundation. I'm envious that you get a chance to ride that steep learning curve. It is a beautiful roller coaster.

A) First of all, live a healthier life. This does not mean just food. But use tdp.me to track small improvements in these four categories: physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual. For me this meant: going to sleep earlier, quitting drinking, eating better, waking up earlier, taking long walks. On the emotional side, I cut all ties with any negative person. This was difficult to do. I once had to hang up on my parents, who were upset with me. Six months later, before I could speak to them again, my father suffered a stroke. I found out about that and went to sleep that night in great pain, knowing that I would never speak to him again, and the previous six months were my last chance to speak to him and I never used him. Sometimes bad things happen.

On the spiritual side I started to meditate every day. Even if it was only for five minutes. I needed to clear my head of all the fear and anxiety that had built up. It was like a steam valve. I needed to let the steam out. And mentally, I started writing ideas every day. Ideas of things I needed to learn, people I needed to interact with, ideas I had for business systems. And so on.

Living a healthier life is the single most important way to increase your chances, but the next steps were almost as important.

B) I have probably read more than 200 books on investing. I read books by or about all the major investors: Warren Buffett, George Soros, the "Market Wizards" series, any book about traders. I read about daytrading techniques, options trading, arbitrage techniques, value investing, fixed income investing, I read about M&A deals that went wrong, that went right, I read about convertible arbitrage, I read about the psychology of trading. I read everything twice. I must have read at least 100 books before I start trading a penny.

C) Community. I started participating in trading and investing message boards. I reached out to the book writers that I enjoyed and began to dialogue with them to learn more. I started meeting other investors for coffee just to learn more about their lives, their jobs, their techniques, their lifestyles. I started "networking."

D) Software. He knew how to program. So I downloaded all the stock market data from 1950 onwards. Every action. Each market index. And I started writing software that looked for patterns. For example, what happens if the market goes down 4 days in a row? What happens if a stock opens 20% the day after the earnings day, etc.? I probably wrote more than 500 programs. Then I started showing other people how to program like I was so that we would all start sharing patterns.

E) Negotiation. I needed to trade for a living. I have no money. My expenses were outrageous. I had no excuse for such expenses, except that during the internet boom I mistakenly decided to live like a drunk rock star. Now I had to survive and I did it by swapping the systems I had programmed. And using the techniques I had read about to help me establish position size, deal with psychology, diversify with different techniques ranging from arbitrage to short term to value.

F) Ideas. I started writing ideas for the articles I wanted to write. Jim Cramer liked my ideas and I started writing for thestreet.com and then for the Financial Times and then I wrote a lot of books on trade.

G) Networking more. As my track record was improving, I began to refer it to other hedge fund managers. More and more of them started giving me money to trade, which I did with success until I decided that I didn't want to trade anymore, but I knew enough about hedge funds that I turned everything I was doing into investing in other traders and started a fund of funds.

H) Reduction of personnel. I knew it could be years before I see significant results in my new career. So I sold / lost the apartment I had been living in in New York and went into self-imposed exile about 70 miles north. My expenses were reduced by approximately 80%. I could breathe again. And in that new freedom, I was able to explore.

Every step of the way I reduced the risk of failure. In the end, the circle was completed. I had a hedge fund fund that paid for my income, plus I was writing and doing well and then I decided to go back to my internet roots, so I built a website that, as an investor, I felt was more useful than any other. another investment website.

When you combine two areas that you master and fall in love with, you end up creating something unique that no one has done before. Your very own baby who can grow and thrive with your love and passion behind him. I did it and it was profitable from day one and then I sold it when it had millions of unique users per month. I was proud of that.

It is through passion and love that you minimize your risk. But that only takes you to the bridge that will lead you to your new career. Ultimately, mass health and grooming, reading, learning, networking, self-education, sacrifice, and actual experience will get you across that bridge into your career.

From start to finish, when I decided to do this new career, it took me: 2 years before I really made a living and about 6 years before I could say that I was VERY successful in it. I think this is a good rule of thumb. If you want to change careers and put in the effort and prepare, wait at least a year before making steady money, and 2-3 years before earning a living, and you should stick with that for 5-7 years. years before it starts to be a big hit. I have done this four times and I would say this rule has been met every time. For example, in 2007 I started investing in angels and I can attest that after doing all of the above it is only now that I am really starting to see the results of that.

Note: I answer this and other similar questions at http://www.jamesaltucher.com/category/askjames/

In order of importance:

  1. Find out how your performance will be measured ... get the metrics and numbers explicit.
  2. Learn the basic skills of your job. The things necessary to be seen as a trustworthy and trustworthy resource.
  3. Make your first 3 assignments and over-communicate your progress to your boss as you work on each task. Ask for feedback at every step, and most importantly, listen and ask questions during the feedback.
  4. Find out how your assignments and role contribute to the overall business goal. This will help you begin to learn how to make compensation decisions about how to spend your ti
Keep reading

In order of importance:

  1. Find out how your performance will be measured ... get the metrics and numbers explicit.
  2. Learn the basic skills of your job. The things necessary to be seen as a trustworthy and trustworthy resource.
  3. Make your first 3 assignments and over-communicate your progress to your boss as you work on each task. Ask for feedback at every step, and most importantly, listen and ask questions during the feedback.
  4. Find out how your assignments and role contribute to the overall business goal. This will help you begin to learn how to make compensation decisions about how to spend your time.
  5. Find someone just before you in your term (1-2 years) and ask them to show you how to be successful ... an informal mentor.
  6. Find out how your boss is measured and what is the weakest part of his performance ... at the end of month 6, you must find a way to contribute to that goal outside of your own personal responsibilities. This is a very high leverage extra credit and will help you differentiate yourself.
  7. Get to know and build rapport with the people in your organization that you will depend on. Do something nice for each of them ... perhaps helping them on a project or simply offering thanks and feedback for a job well done.
  8. Spend time with your team without work. Get to know them personally.
  9. Learn to talk about the importance of your role, business unit strategy, and company mission. These things are useful.

From a company perspective, the onboarding experience is critical, so creating a dynamic process that engages the new hire not only in their job, but also in the team and the company as a whole is critical. I've seen companies create a "buddy program" during the first few weeks of a new hire's start date in which the partner will show the employee, have lunch with him, and basically act as a mentor for whatever comes up. I think this is a great initiative and a way to not only get the new hire involved, but to allow other employees to show what makes the company great.

Keep reading

From a company perspective, the onboarding experience is critical, so creating a dynamic process that engages the new hire not only in their job, but also in the team and the company as a whole is critical. I've seen companies create a "buddy program" during the first few weeks of a new hire's start date in which the partner will show the employee, have lunch with him, and basically act as a mentor for whatever comes up. I think this is a great initiative and a way to not only get the new hire involved, but to allow other employees to show what makes the company great.

As well as creating a dynamic welcome, the basics need to be adhered to as well, and trust me, this can get tricky if left unattended. Computers, email, phone, etc. must be up and running before the employee begins. While this may be basic, I've seen it take up to a week to get a new employee a computer, which is very sloppy and leaves the employee wondering what they got themselves into.

Be on time, even a few minutes early.

Ask questions (you'll only be a “new guy” once at this company) and everyone probably expects you to ask questions at this point. Don't wait, ask questions NOW.

Work hard, but be efficient. Come to work a little earlier, get off work a little later. Use the time in between wisely.

When you run out of things to do, ask for more. Managers love employees who ask for more.

Think of your customer.

Say yes. "Even if you think you can't do something, if your manager offers it, say" Yes. "Then ask for help, if you need it.

Be positive. Do not talk about your so

Keep reading

Be on time, even a few minutes early.

Ask questions (you'll only be a “new guy” once at this company) and everyone probably expects you to ask questions at this point. Don't wait, ask questions NOW.

Work hard, but be efficient. Come to work a little earlier, get off work a little later. Use the time in between wisely.

When you run out of things to do, ask for more. Managers love employees who ask for more.

Think of your customer.

Say yes. "Even if you think you can't do something, if your manager offers it, say" Yes. "Then ask for help, if you need it.

Be positive. Don't talk about your sore throat. Don't tell us you got into a car accident. Don't complain about their poor service at dinner last night. Be the person who gives the benefit of the doubt and has a brilliant view of things.

Accept feedback and take it seriously. Comments are rare and difficult to accept. Make yourself heard by the person who is correcting you and accept that even if the larger message they are giving you is not something you agree with, find something in it that you can. It will make you better.

Congratulations on the new company!

Some advices

  1. Develop a framework - Check out the Product Management course on udemy.com. It's free and has ~ 18 amazing product management videos with lectures from leaders on AirBnB, Hubspot, Living Social, etc.
  2. Find a mentor - Find someone who has been there before to provide the right emotional support and inspiration for your toughest problems.
  3. Be adaptable - you'll often be wrong, product management is often more about creating a process that seeks the truth rather than just having it

It depends on who likes the boss the most. The choice of the boss who rises in a purely subjective way.

No boss makes the decision objectively. For example, if the boss values ​​loyalty, he may be inclined to give the old man the promotion. If the boss values ​​the results, then he can give them to the young woman.

Either way, a promotion is mostly out of your control, unless you're sure the boss likes you more than the other person. That's the one who gets the promotion. Whoever is dearest. Not who is the best for the job.

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