What are some of the questions asked in Google interviews?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Arthur Harper



What are some of the questions asked in Google interviews?

Google has a reputation for asking tough and puzzle questions in interviews that challenge the way it performs under pressure.

Most of them require you to think quantitatively and broadly, and test how you approach problems in the moment.

Google will likely change its questions over time, but the career website Glassdoor offers a glimpse of the types of puzzles Google has posed in the past.

Google Interview Questions ...

  • How many golf balls can fit on a school bus?

Job: Product Manager

Answer: This is one of those questions that Google asks just to see if the applicant can explain the key challenge.

Keep reading

Google has a reputation for asking tough and puzzle questions in interviews that challenge the way it performs under pressure.

Most of them require you to think quantitatively and broadly, and test how you approach problems in the moment.

Google will likely change its questions over time, but the career website Glassdoor offers a glimpse of the types of puzzles Google has posed in the past.

Google Interview Questions ...

  • How many golf balls can fit on a school bus?

Job: Product Manager

Answer: This is one of those questions that Google asks just to see if the requester can explain the key challenge to solving the problem.

Reader Matt Beuchamp came up with an excellent answer, writing:

I imagine that a standard school bus is approximately 8 feet wide by 6 feet high by 20 feet long; this is just an assumption based on the thousands of hours I have been trapped behind school buses while traffic in all directions is stopped.

That means 960 cubic feet and since there are 1728 cubic inches in one cubic foot, that means about 1.6 million cubic inches.

I estimate the volume of a golf ball to be about 2.5 cubic inches (4/3 * pi * .85), since .85 inches is the radius of a golf ball.

Divide those 2.5 cubic inches by 1.6 million and you've got 660,000 golf balls. However, since there are seats and junk that take up space and also since the spherical shape of a golf ball means that there will be considerable empty space between them when stacked, I will round up to 500,000 golf balls.

Which sounds ridiculous. I would have made spit balls no more than 100k. But I keep my math.

Of course, if we're talking about the type of bus George Bush went to school on or Barney Frank goes to work every day, it would be half ... or 250,000 golf balls.

  • How much should you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle?

Job: Product Manager

Answer: This is one of those questions where the trick is to find an answer that is easier than what is apparently being asked. We would say. "$ 10 per window."

Not all difficult Google questions are necessarily meant to be riddles; some of them sound simple but are difficult to answer in a concise way.

Let's look at some more issues raised in the Google interview ...

1. What is your favorite Google product and how would you improve it? - Associate Product Manager, January 2016

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2. If you wanted to take your dog to work, but one of your team members was allergic to dogs, what would you do? - Associate Account Strategist, December 2014

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3. If the ads were removed from YouTube, how would you monetize them? - Associate Account Strategist, January 2016

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4. What do you know about Google? - Administrative Business Partner, February 2015

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5. Design an evacuation plan for the building .-- Business Analyst, November 2014

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6. What do you think has the most advertising potential in Boston, a flower shop or a funeral home? - Account Strategist, October 2015

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7. A coin was tossed 1,000 times and there were 560 heads. Do you think the coin is skewed? - Quantitative Analyst, September 2015

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8. What does "being Googley" mean to you? - Product Specialist, December 2015

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9. Name a joke you would play on xmanager if you were hired - Google Application Support Engineer, June 2014

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10. What is your opinion on whether people should be required to use their official name when opening a Gmail or Google+ account? - Administrative Assistant, April 2014

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11. What would you like to do if you didn't have to work? - Interaction Designer, September 2014

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12. What scares you? - Interview with a business analyst, September 2014.

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13. How many ways can you think of to find a needle in a haystack? - Business partner, May 2014

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14. Calculate the number of tennis balls that can fit on an airplane .-- Intern, December 2015

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15. If you could be remembered by one sentence, what would it be? - Associate Account Strategist, March 2014

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16. If you could only choose one song to play every time you walked into a room for the rest of your life, what would it be? - Associate Account Strategist, March 2014

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17. How do you think the world of digital advertising will change in the next three years? - Creative Director, January 2016

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18. What three things would you change at your university / workplace if you were CEO today? - Account Strategist, April 2014

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19. Describing AdWords to a 7-Year-Old - Associate Account Strategist, December 2014

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20. You have a grocery delivery service (similar to Amazon Fresh) that delivers food within 24 hours. Calculate how many trucks you need to operate this service .-- Product Manager, November 2015

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21. How would you explain cloud computing to a 6-year-old? - Product Manager, November 2015

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22. Tell me what you think about Google charging users $ 1 a month to use Gmail. BOLD Candidate, October 2015

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23. How many haircuts do you think occur in the United States each year? - Business partner, May 2014

24. List six things that make you nervous (Android Compatibility Level III, July 2014)

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25. Tell me something about yourself that is not on your resume. Associate Account Strategist, March 2014

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26. What is the market for driverless cars in 2020? - Product Manager, November 2015

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27. Model the raindrops that fall on a sidewalk (the sidewalk is 1 m and the raindrops are 1 cm). How can we tell if the sidewalk is completely wet? - Software Engineer, January 2016

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28. How would I explain the importance of HTML 5 to Larry Page and then to my grandmother? - Creative Specialist, January 2016

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29. Tell me a joke. - Executive Assistant, March 2014

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30. Would you rather earn money or learn? - Software Engineer, January 2016

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31. If I gave you $ 10 million right now, what would you do? - Associate Account Strategist, May 2014

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32. Define a service that allows you to travel to the future .-- Interaction Designer, December 2015

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33. Would you remove the link to an extremist writing? - Legal Assistant, December 2015

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34. How could humanity's greatest crisis be solved with a billion dollars and a spaceship? - Database Administrator, December 2015

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35. You have a colony on Mars that you want to communicate with. How do you create a system to communicate with them? - Associate Product Manager, November 2014

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36. How many cars cross a bridge each day? - Advertising interview, September 2014.

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37. If you had access to a bank's database, how would you use that information to design an ATM for the elderly? - Associate Product Manager, February 2015

38. How would you improve a shoe factory? - Field Operations Specialist, November 2014

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39. Design of a mobile social application for a chain of local orthodontist offices - Product manager, November 2015

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40. What is the number of new book titles published in the US each year? - Product Manager, November 2015

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41. How would you solve homelessness in downtown San Francisco? - Product manager, November 2015

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Happy reading !!

Shraddha ❤

Source: 41 of Google's Hardest Interview Questions

Answers to 15 Google Interview Questions That Made Geniuses Feel Silly

As you probably know, there are more types of interviews. One tests your algorithmic thinking, another tests your design skills, and there's an HR interview, of course. I've done interviews with more tech companies and these are the questions I remember:

Algorithmic questions:

  • Given is the number N. Create a function that calculates math \ sqrt {N} / math.
  • Given is a matrix that contains N numbers, A 0, A 1, ... A N-1. Calculate the matrix B of length N, such that B i = A 0 * A 1 * ... A i-1 * A i + 1 ... * A N-1 . The algorithm should work in O (N) time and cannot use division.
  • The sequence of numbers is given: 1, 11, 21, 1211, 11122
Keep reading

As you probably know, there are more types of interviews. One tests your algorithmic thinking, another tests your design skills, and there's an HR interview, of course. I've done interviews with more tech companies and these are the questions I remember:

Algorithmic questions:

  • Given is the number N. Create a function that calculates math \ sqrt {N} / math.
  • Given is a matrix that contains N numbers, A 0, A 1, ... A N-1. Calculate the matrix B of length N, such that B i = A 0 * A 1 * ... A i-1 * A i + 1 ... * A N-1 . The algorithm should work in O (N) time and cannot use division.
  • Given the sequence of numbers: 1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221, ... Find out how the sequence works and create the function to calculate the next element.
  • Given is the array A that contains N numbers. Find three different indices i, j, k, such that A i + A j + A k == 0. The algorithm should work in time O (N ^ 2).
  • The matrix M of size X * Y is given, filled with integers. The rows and columns of the matrix are arranged in ascending order. Find the number of zeros in the matrix at time O (X + Y).
  • You will be given N numbers, one at a time. Each time you are given a number, write the median of the numbers you already have. The total time of the algorithm must be O (N * log (N)). It should also argue why it can't be O (N).
  • You have been given an unknown number of items, one at a time. At any time you can decide between keeping the new object and throwing the one you already have, or throwing the new object and keeping the one you already have (that is, you can only use constant memory). Pick up the random item with uniform probability.
  • It has a short string A and a long string B. Count the number of occurrences of A in B. Describe the possible algorithms that can accomplish this task in a quick time. What if you had shorter strings, A1, A2, ... AN?


Then there are many questions that test only implementation skills that only require backtracking to solve:

  • A person types a query in a search box. Of course, you can misspell some of the letters. You are given the list of possible typographical errors, for example, duplicating some letter (typographical error versus typography), not duplicating some letter (writing versus writing), etc. The dictionary of valid words is also provided to you. Generate all the possible words that the person would have liked to write.


Design:

  • You have thousands of computers that process some tasks. To store task results, each task must be identified by a unique ID. Design a fast and reliable system to distribute these IDs to computers.

    My solution worked like this: we will have a MASTER server. Each worker has to ask MASTER for an ID range to use. When the worker uses all the IDs, it asks MASTER for a new range of unused IDs.
    We are using ID ranges, because asking the MASTER for each new ID would overload the system and be slow.
    We also don't want to use too bi intervals, because when a worker fails, we don't know which IDs he used and which ones he didn't, so we discard all IDs given to that server. If we used too large intervals, we would soon run out of ID.


Programming Language Skills:
(This is highly dependent on the language you choose. For me it was C ++, so the questions were as follows)

  • For a member function of some object:
    const int * Object::f(const int const * v) const {...}
    explain what each constant means
  • Explain how virtual functions work.

I attend a technical interview meeting group, and there have been a few occasions where a Google employee has conducted mock interviews. I'm not sure how they match up with the actual Google interview questions, but this was a public event so there were presumably no nondisclosure terms. The problem they asked me was: "Imagine you are implementing a tabletop marble maze.

(The holes in the maze floor weren't introduced during the problem, although that would probably make it a bit more fun.) You can rotate the board in only one direction at a time, and you can't pause the board midway. -roll; each rotation will be

Keep reading

I attend a technical interview meeting group, and there have been a few occasions where a Google employee has conducted mock interviews. I'm not sure how they match up with the actual Google interview questions, but this was a public event so there were presumably no nondisclosure terms. The problem they asked me was: "Imagine you are implementing a tabletop marble maze.

(The holes in the maze floor weren't introduced during the problem, although that would probably make it a bit more fun.) You can rotate the board in only one direction at a time, and you can't pause the board midway. -roll; each rotation will cause the ball to meet the end of a wall. "

  1. What pattern could you use to implement this?
  2. What would the API look like?
  3. A maze has been serialized to a file in which each cell in the maze is represented by bits that describe the presence or absence of a wall. So if a certain cell has a wall to the north and west but not south or east, it would be represented as 1001 or 9 (where the bits represent NESW in order). Given a CSV file where each row represents a comma separated list of cells for one row of the maze, how would you parse this file in the API from step 2? (eg "9,6,11,12 \ n3,10,10,4 \ n13,9,12,5 \ n3,6,1,6" in a 4x4 maze where \ n represents a new line).

Given the context of the group, we solved the problem fairly quickly; in a real interview, they would have given me an hour, so the question would probably have additional parts. This is also not necessarily representative of the average difficulty of a Google question; He said that the difficulty generally increased, to avoid nullifying the confidence of the interviewee.

Other cool notes: All things being equal, Python is a better language choice for whiteboard coding, given its relatively concise syntax and whitespace-based indentation, so if you know Python well enough to answer a question determined, go ahead and choose it. another language. Of course, this depends on the position and even the interviewer, as different interviewers can have wildly different backgrounds and ask you a variety of different questions. There is also a difference between technical focus questions like the one above and more design oriented questions, which I think is covered in another answer.

There are several books (for example, Cracking the Coding Interview) that supposedly talk more about the interview strategies of some of the major software companies, including Google, and they come with hundreds of questions that test the same concepts. Not a bad buy if you are preparing for an upcoming interview.

I work at Google. I do a lot of interviews. The main things I would really like candidates to do for preparation are:
1. Practice problems that can be solved in 20 minutes.
2. Practice coding on a board.

Coding interviews is not the same skill as coding in real life, where you have Stack Overflow, reference materials, and an editor. However, these are the skills that we prove in the in-person interviews. Having practice on these gives me a better and clearer signal about your actual skill level, rather than how unfamiliar you are with coding in an interview setting.

The other thing to keep in mind is

Keep reading

I work at Google. I do a lot of interviews. The main things I would really like candidates to do for preparation are:
1. Practice problems that can be solved in 20 minutes.
2. Practice coding on a board.

Coding interviews is not the same skill as coding in real life, where you have Stack Overflow, reference materials, and an editor. However, these are the skills that we prove in the in-person interviews. Having practice on these gives me a better and clearer signal about your actual skill level, rather than how unfamiliar you are with coding in an interview setting.

The other thing to note that is particular to Google is that my interface to the process is that I talk to you, then I write 1,000 to 1,500 words about how it went, and that's it. No meetings, no shades of gray, no non-verbal doubts. The more you can show that you really understand the problem, the better I can write an essay. Please help me write a great essay about you. Think out loud. I need to see how you think so I can be sure you got a correct answer, instead of being lucky. I care a lot more about seeing you get out of a mistake or discussing alternative approaches than getting a "perfect" (probably memorized) answer.

You should be able to:
- Understand an English description of a problem and produce a working code.
- Analyze an unknown problem and discuss the Big-O for space and the velocity of various alternatives.
- Recognize situations in which common software tools would be appropriate. (I will never ask "tell me what a database is for"; I will give you a problem where using a database is a reasonable approach, and I hope you realize that.)
- Discuss trade-offs wisely. There are very few absolute aspects to software design at any level, from feature signing to N-tier architecture.

Many good answers here. I assume you are talking about questions about the "Software Engineer" position. I'll just add my two cents of experience.

It depends on the type of communication. Some examples:

  • You could complete a really difficult algorithmic / math challenge in Codility. Obviously, there is zero tolerance for syntax issues and your code will most likely undergo automated testing, so it must pass all test cases. It makes sense because they give you 24 hours to write your production code to perfection.
  • You may be asked to type a code into a Google document in a telephone interview, we will
Keep reading

Many good answers here. I assume you are talking about questions about the "Software Engineer" position. I'll just add my two cents of experience.

It depends on the type of communication. Some examples:

  • You could complete a really difficult algorithmic / math challenge in Codility. Obviously, there is zero tolerance for syntax issues and your code will most likely undergo automated testing, so it must pass all test cases. It makes sense because they give you 24 hours to write your production code to perfection.
  • You might be asked to write code in a Google document in a telephone interview, primarily based on data structures and algorithms. The challenge is to be quick, clear, concise, punctual and precise while being communicative (gathering requirements). You should be able to show your requirements analysis, algorithm design, implementation (and boy, should you be good with STL if you're doing it in C ++), test, and finally critique your own code.
  • For an on-site interview, it really varies and there are many experienced interviewers with their own way of interviewing. You could get an interview with someone young who could ask you a direct question, or someone at a higher level (even if you are interviewing as an SE) who would ask you a question about the design of the system. I even had the experience of being interviewed by someone who had a Ph.D. and it gave me a hard time with machine learning problems. There is absolutely nothing you can expect from an interview on Google's site (except that they are all on time, super strict when it comes to code, HARD, and very friendly).


In short, you would not need to know "questions". You need to be really good at an eloquent, mainstream language (C ++, python, Java are good choices). Must be really good at their respective libraries / frameworks (STL for C ++, JDK for Java). You need to be really good at gathering requirements and clarifying the scope of the question, communicating assumptions, arguing complexities, writing clean and correct code on the board, testing your code, and critiquing your code. On top of that, you need to know the system layout, OS concepts, threading / blocking, etc., even network latencies, as much as you can from your CS experience. They are really going to improve your breadth and depth in terms of computation.

I am currently a full time employee at Google in the business organization; I have worked at Google for 1 year and was a contractor in 2010 for a year. If you are asking an engineering question, I cannot help, but there are many books and questions on Quora that will be helpful in preparing you for an engineer interview.

For business interviews, you are asked questions about role-related knowledge, general cognitive ability, teamwork / leadership, and Googliness (which is basically your fit for culture). To answer these questions, it is important to have a strategy that gives you insight

Keep reading

I am currently a full time employee at Google in the business organization; I have worked at Google for 1 year and was a contractor in 2010 for a year. If you are asking an engineering question, I cannot help, but there are many books and questions on Quora that will be helpful in preparing you for an engineer interview.

For business interviews, you are asked questions about role-related knowledge, general cognitive ability, teamwork / leadership, and Googliness (which is basically your fit for culture). In answering these questions, it is important to have a strategy that gives the interviewer a good idea of ​​how you think about these topic areas. Good answers are usually well-structured, linear, and complete answers. They show that you understand the questions (asked questions to address assumptions) and organized your thoughts to craft an answer from multiple perspectives, drawing logical conclusions and meaningful data sources. They will generally ask follow-up questions to explore their knowledge or get a more detailed answer.

Google interviewers are usually quite well trained and each session will focus on a specific focus area. In my case, I was not asked very challenging questions during the on-site interview, but I was interviewed again by a professional who asked a challenging problem-solving question that involved a paradox with user feedback that was not supported by data. It is common to have an additional interview when the feedback from previous interviews was not useful enough to calibrate or evaluate the candidate. My response, which the interviewer and recruiter told me was very good, included asking questions to clarify assumptions, addressed how I would test to better understand the paradox, who would I consult, data sources I would turn to to eliminate the paradox. , and proposed a solution to solve the problem given what was known about the paradox. I was asked to dig deeper into some areas, asked to address concerns related to those affected by the paradox, and was presented with some changes in the assumptions and conditions of the question. My response was very structured, thoughtful, and comprehensive, and this is the correct approach to take in preparation and in practice.

Hello there,

First of all, let me tell you one thing, it all depends on the nature of the interviewer and the mood of the interviewer who wants to ask. Most of the time, the interviewer tries to ask what they have learned recently.

Not only in google, in almost all companies, the interviewer asks mainly about data structure, DBMS and SQL queries, algorithms and their applications and coding and yes, the most important thing about their projects.

Therefore, you must be prepared at least on these issues.

This is the google interview process:

  1. 2 Google phone interviews that focus on basic problem solving and data structures
  2. 2-4 Google Codi
Keep reading

Hello there,

First of all, let me tell you one thing, it all depends on the nature of the interviewer and the mood of the interviewer who wants to ask. Most of the time, the interviewer tries to ask what they have learned recently.

Not only in google, in almost all companies, the interviewer asks mainly about data structure, DBMS and SQL queries, algorithms and their applications and coding and yes, the most important thing about their projects.

Therefore, you must be prepared at least on these issues.

This is the google interview process:

  1. 2 Google phone interviews that focus on basic problem solving and data structures
  2. 2-4 Interviews on Google's coding site involving whiteboard solutions for slightly more difficult algorithmic problems / data structures. The less experience you have, the greater the number of rounds of on-site coding interviews for you.
  3. 0-2 On-site system design interviews involving the creation of high-level design architectures for real-life products. The more experience you have, the more interviews you will have to face.

And the most frequent HR questions are:

Q. 1. Why do you want to join?

Q. 2. What do you know about Google's competition?

Q. 3. What else do you want me to know about you that I haven't discovered yet?

Q. 4. If I open your browser history, what will I learn about your personality?

Q. 5. What are your favorite products on Google, how will you try to improve it?

P. 6. ¿Describe tu proceso anterior con el trabajo?

P. 7. Cuéntenos sobre un incidente en el que se arriesgó y falló, ¿cómo se le ocurrió?

P. 8. ¿Ha logrado algún logro significativo y está orgulloso de ello?

P. 9. Si se une al equipo, ¿qué impacto es probable que tenga en él?

P. 10. Comparta su experiencia previa de trabajo en un entorno no estructurado y ¿cómo se las arregló para trabajar?

¡Espero que te ayude!

Vota a favor si te gusta.

¿Por qué Google?

¿Porqué quieres este trabajo?

¿Qué significa para ti "ser Googley"?

cuénteme acerca de un momento en que su comportamiento tuvo un impacto positivo en su equipo. ¿Cuál fue su objetivo principal y por qué? ¿Cómo respondieron tus compañeros de equipo? De cara al futuro, ¿cuál es tu plan?

Tell me about a time when you effectively managed your team to achieve a goal. How was your approach? What were your goals and how did you accomplish them as an individual and as a team? How did you adapt your leadership approach to different people? What was the key takeaway from this specific situation?

Tell me about once you had difficulties

Keep reading

Why Google?

Why do you want this job?

What does "being Googley" mean to you?

tell me about a time when your behavior had a positive impact on your team. What was your main objective and why? How did your teammates respond? Looking ahead, what is your plan?

Tell me about a time when you effectively managed your team to achieve a goal. How was your approach? What were your goals and how did you accomplish them as an individual and as a team? How did you adapt your leadership approach to different people? What was the key takeaway from this specific situation?

Tell me about a time you had difficulty working with someone (can be a coworker, classmate, client). What made this person difficult to work with for you? What steps did you take to resolve the problem? What was the outcome? What could you have done differently?)

Describe one of the difficulties you have encountered.

"Tell me about two suggestions you have made to your manager in the past year. How did you come up with the ideas? What happened? How do you feel about the way things went?"

A long time ago, I interviewed for Google. Even though I didn't pass the interview process, my interviewing experience at Google was the best interviewing experience I've ever had, and I give credit to the great engineers at Google for asking thought-provoking questions. I was going to take up a senior management position in the engineering group, so I was asked questions that were of a different nature than the questions likely to be asked of SDE candidates.

A great question from a manager of the Google Maps group was to describe how the routes between two street addresses were calculated with

Keep reading

A long time ago, I interviewed for Google. Even though I didn't pass the interview process, my interviewing experience at Google was the best interviewing experience I've ever had, and I give credit to the great engineers at Google for asking thought-provoking questions. I was going to take up a senior management position in the engineering group, so I was asked questions that were of a different nature than the questions likely to be asked of SDE candidates.

One great question from a manager in the Google Maps group was to describe how routes were calculated between any two street addresses within Google Maps. This question certainly threw me for a loop, and was not typical of the problems that I had to solve during my 25 year career on Wall Street. I was going down the path of a Djikstra-like solution, but then the manager asked me the question "What would you say if I told you that we pre-calculate the path between any two addresses in the USA?". This made me change gears right away, and made me realize that at Google-scale, this might be viable solution....which made me start mumbling things about Hadoop that were probably incorrect. Nevertheless, it was an amazingly thought-provoking question, and I *still* would love to find out how Google implements the almost instantaneous calculations of driving directions.

Aside from the question above, many of the questions I got from the other managers were like "Twitter layout. Real-time search layout. Instagram layout. Facebook layout."

I work at Google. I conduct interviews. Everyone who works at Google conducts interviews. This is how this works:

An interesting question occurs to me. I thought about it a lot. And over time, I get really good with the question. I learn that presenting something in a certain way is a waste of time. Then I learn to present it in another way so that the candidate spends more time interviewing and less time listening to me explain. I get really good with this question so I can use it to help the candidate show me what he is really capable of.

Then someone posts the question to one of

Keep reading

I work at Google. I conduct interviews. Everyone who works at Google conducts interviews. This is how this works:

An interesting question occurs to me. I thought about it a lot. And over time, I get really good with the question. I learn that presenting something in a certain way is a waste of time. Then I learn to present it in another way so that the candidate spends more time interviewing and less time listening to me explain. I get really good with this question so I can use it to help the candidate show me what he is really capable of.

Then, someone posts the question on one of these sites, despite the NDA, and now the question gets put on the banned list. So I have to start all over with a new question that I am not familiar with. And you pay the price, because I am going to err on the side of caution and go with no-hire if you are borderline.

Question: Design an evacuation plan for the building.

This question was asked in a November 2014 interview

mathQuestion: Anywhere in the world, where would you open up a new Google office and how would you figure out compensation for all the employees at this new office? /math

Question: A man pushed his car to a hotel and lost his fortune. What happened?

A software engineer candidate was asked this question in an interview at Google.

Question: How would you solve homelessness in downtown San Francisco?

Asked in November 2015 of a candidate who was interviewed for the Product Manager position.

Question: If you had acc

Keep reading

Question: Design an evacuation plan for the building.

This question was asked in a November 2014 interview.

math Question: Anywhere in the world, where would you open a new Google office and how would you calculate compensation for all employees in this new office? /Math

Question: A man pushed his car into a hotel and lost his fortune. What happened?

A software engineer candidate was asked this question in a Google interview.

Question: How would you solve homelessness in downtown San Francisco?

Asked in November 2015 of a candidate who was interviewed for the Product Manager position.

Question: If you had access to a bank's database, how would you use that information to design an ATM for seniors?

Esta pregunta se hizo en una entrevista en febrero de 2015.

Question: Estimate the number of students who are college seniors, attend four-year schools, and graduate with a job in the United States every year.

This question was asked to a candidate interviewing for the post of product marketing manager.

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