What are some of the low-paying jobs that require hard work?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Walker Henry



What are some of the low-paying jobs that require hard work?

(For a more detailed answer, see Thom Lu's answer to What high-paying jobs don't require 40 hours per week?)

(This answer only applies to the US; I'm not sure if this is correct in other countries.) I heard from my friends in medical school that dermatologists don't have to work very hard at their job (being a dermatologist requires you not to make a lot of difficult judgments or work long hours compared to other medical specialties) and to be paid very well.

However, there is a problem: the process of becoming a dermatologist is very difficult. Dermatology residencies are very competitive, so you should be at the top of your class in medical school, which is already made up of top undergraduate students.

If you are more interested in jobs with a lower barrier to entry, truck driving does not require a degree and generally pays quite well, but it does require one to work long hours.

However, basic economics dictates that no job will pay well at the same time, have few barriers to entry, and require relatively little work; if such a job existed, everyone would be struggling to get it. This increases the supply of people available to work in that job, which lowers the market price for workers in that occupation, that is, the salary.

I'm going to take advantage of what Bill said about the trades, I'm just going to focus on an electrician because that's what I am. They pay me to go to school 5 weeks a year. When I finish, I will have a license and some college credits in case I want to become an engineer.

My first year doing this in Montana, I made about 55k, and I was only 19 years old. Three years later and I only won around 70k. Now I'm stuck in Montana because I don't have a license yet. My friends who can travel earn six figures and take months off every year.

Is this job easy? Much. I think a lot of people are shy

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I'm going to take advantage of what Bill said about the trades, I'm just going to focus on an electrician because that's what I am. They pay me to go to school 5 weeks a year. When I finish, I will have a license and some college credits in case I want to become an engineer.

My first year doing this in Montana, I made about 55k, and I was only 19 years old. Three years later and I only won around 70k. Now I'm stuck in Montana because I don't have a license yet. My friends who can travel earn six figures and take months off every year.

Is this job easy? Much. I think a lot of people avoid it for an obvious reason. Who has the most influence on someone who decides his future career? Other than parents, it is probably someone in the school system like a teacher or a counselor. They all went to college, so guess what they are going to put pressure on the others?

You hear a lot about people who come out of college with a degree that they can't do anything with. The day you hear that about an electrical license will also be the day you hear about swine aviation. In fact, Ideal Industries says we will have a shortage of 60,000 electricians within 7 years. The shortage of electricians creates potential for six-figure jobs. I think it could be more. All this technology that has been growing exponentially does not require philosophy to work; requires electricity.

Side note: If you are in Montana and want to be an electrician, contact my friend Austin Rodgers and he will help you. 406–694–2226

If you are really looking for something amazing yet easy to do in life, do your research on the professions listed below.

1.Bed heater

Nobody wants to get into a cold bed. And also, if you are unsure about electronics, the night could become difficult for you. In such situations, hiring a Human Bed Warmer might be the best alternative.

Yes… a human bed warmer… There is nothing cheesy about this job. Everything is professional.

Although it must cost you a lot, if you watch from the other side, you can gain good just by lying on the bed.

2. Recovery of aircraft

Airplane repo men a

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If you are really looking for something amazing yet easy to do in life, do your research on the professions listed below.

1.Bed heater

Nobody wants to get into a cold bed. And also, if you are unsure about electronics, the night could become difficult for you. In such situations, hiring a Human Bed Warmer might be the best alternative.

Yes… a human bed warmer… There is nothing cheesy about this job. Everything is professional.

Although it must cost you a lot, if you watch from the other side, you can gain good just by lying on the bed.

2. Recovery of aircraft

Aircraft repositories are, although an interesting job, but also dangerous at the same time. They will have to investigate, track, recover, gracefully, deliver aircraft and gracefully. The aircraft repository manager must be a good pilot licensed to fly all types of aircraft. You may have to fly a private jet, a rusty seaplane, a traffic helicopter, a twin-engine propeller plane, or even a 747, a duster. With so many types of aircraft, an aircraft repositories need to be able to fly just about anything.

3. Snuggled

Snugglers are hired to hug them, need a hug? .... Hire a professional Snuggler, you can find them through calls. They can work with people of all ages. Although people may have the wrong impression regarding your profession. It is so clear to them that you are a professional hugger and will not engage in sexual activity.

4. Astronomer

Many people misunderstand the theory of astronomy with the notion of disbelief. But it is a science, which focuses on specific questions and gives the answer from the movement of the Universe.

This job is very interesting and can earn you a lot of money.

5.Golf recovery

Golf Retrievers are the ones who recover the ball when the player misses it. They can also be professional recyclers. And you can win up to $ 15, that's a pretty good amount. Many people work as golf retrievers. What can be better than exercising and earning money at the same time?

6. Master marijuana extractor

An official certification process is not necessary. To become an excellent marijuana extraction technician, you must have real-world experience, but you will earn enough rewards for your efforts. As a marijuana extractor, you can earn up to $ 80,000-120,000 per year.

7. Hot dog cart vendor

Americans spend $ 2 billion a year on hot dogs, according to the Sausage Council. Although it is incredible that a salesman of hot dogs makes six figures a year. The reason behind this is that startup costs are easily within reach and the markup on hot dogs and associated products can be heavenly.

8. Online dating ghostwriter.

In the last twenty years, online dating has reached a different platform where they make $ 3.2 billion per year. According to a survey, 49 million singles have dabbled in online dating at least once in their lives, but still, to get a better impression, people started hiring professional ghostwriters.

To establish my credentials, I was an investment banker in 3 companies for 8 years. I'd like to dispel some common misconceptions about ibanking that seem to perpetuate themselves here:

  • Long hours: When you are new to work, the hours can be very long, but this is mainly because you are learning how to do the job. From a high-level perspective, new staff may be around 80 hours a week, but most of the time is spent "learning." An experienced analyst / associate can complete an analysis in 1 hour, which could take an ecological analyst 10-15 hours (and multiple feedback sessions with your
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To establish my credentials, I was an investment banker in 3 companies for 8 years. I'd like to dispel some common misconceptions about ibanking that seem to perpetuate themselves here:

  • Long hours: When you are new to work, the hours can be very long, but this is mainly because you are learning how to do the job. From a high-level perspective, new staff may be around 80 hours a week, but most of the time is spent "learning." An experienced analyst / associate can complete an analysis in 1 hour which could take an ecological analyst 10-15 hours (and multiple feedback sessions with their team). In fact, the new analyst's supervisor can spend more than 1 hour teaching and giving feedback on this exercise alone. Why waste the time when you could do it yourself? It is seen as an investment in your staff that will pay off in the long run. Why do you care as a new analyst? Someone is basically paying you a very high salary to learn all about finance!
  • Risk: At the largest banks, analysts are rarely fired unless there has been a serious incident or the analyst has a bad work ethic. Statistically, you have a ~ 90% chance of staying for the 2-year program. Most analysts are expected to leave at the end of the second year and some will stay for a third year. Most will find good jobs. Some will opt for an MBA. Very few can be invited to remain as associates. Therefore, the "risk" is quite low; just know that the analyst's "program" will end and that you will need to find something new. If you stay in the bank for several years,
  • Analysis versus sales: junior staff are not "salespeople"; analysts (college graduates) and associates (MBA graduates, typically) are rarely involved in the actual pitch / sale. They are mostly involved in the preparation of financial analysis and supporting materials under the direction of a vice president in support of a director / CEO who is coordinating the launch. The Director / MD is also not a pure "salesperson", as he (a) needs to conceptualize, supervise and speak to the analysis contained in the speech and (b) will supervise the execution of the deal if it occurs. So for the first ~ 6 years of your career you will focus primarily on analytics rather than sales and if you stay in a longer career you will become a thought leader in valuation,

I hope this helps. I can't talk about working in a hedge fund.

There are many alternative careers that draw on finance and risk management skills that are generally just as rewarding as investment banking.

In my own career, I spent 25 years at JPM as an investment banker and then 15 years in corporate insurance with a global insurer called Swiss Re.

Both races were fascinating and rewarding. Spend some time checking the websites of global insurance companies and brokers. You will discover that the world of risk assessment, management and underwriting draws on many of the skills you developed as a banker, but uses them differently.

if you have

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There are many alternative careers that draw on finance and risk management skills that are generally just as rewarding as investment banking.

In my own career, I spent 25 years at JPM as an investment banker and then 15 years in corporate insurance with a global insurer called Swiss Re.

Both races were fascinating and rewarding. Spend some time checking the websites of global insurance companies and brokers. You will discover that the world of risk assessment, management and underwriting draws on many of the skills you developed as a banker, but uses them differently.

If you have a background in math, science, or engineering, you will find the work environment to be more academic. People discuss much more about methodology, process and validation. (If you have economics or accounting or another degree, try that too)

Depending on where you work at an insurance company or broker, the "thrill of a deal" can be as great as being an investment banker. As an insurer, you are evaluating and assuming a risk that remains. This means that insurers generally think longer term and that translates into payment as well as work-life balance.

The pay is great, but it's spread more evenly than at an investment bank. There are very few stars. It's more of a team-based environment where you stay with your company longer, get paid for performance without big bonus spikes (and valleys), and build your career over 10 years. There are no instant earnings.

The Swiss Re and Munich Re websites are a good first step in learning more.

My company is not around the size of a startup (it is much larger), but it is going through some headaches trying to figure out how to use MBA people. It used to be a small engineering company with a very positive culture, known for doing projects where most other companies failed.

Now, they've grown big enough that some people think “Hey, we did pretty good at promoting engineers to management. How much better could we do if we hired "real" business people (MBAs) in managerial positions? "

Over the past five years, what they have discovered is that it is much easier

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My company is not around the size of a startup (it is much larger), but it is going through some headaches trying to figure out how to use MBA people. It used to be a small engineering company with a very positive culture, known for doing projects where most other companies failed.

Now, they've grown big enough that some people think “Hey, we did pretty good at promoting engineers to management. How much better could we do if we hired "real" business people (MBAs) in managerial positions? "

In the last five years, what they have found is that it is much easier to teach an engineer (or anyone with technical experience) some basic finance and relationships skills with people than it is to take someone with an MBA and try to teach them what to do. enough. technical skills to manage an engineering department.

My old manager actually had a mechanical engineering degree and an MBA, but he didn't think like an engineer. He tried to solve all the problems using what he was taught in his MBA classes, and he was never able to understand the technical nuances or speak the same language as the engineers he was trying to manage. He just couldn't understand what was relevant.

Senior engineers who have worked for the company for decades say things down the hall like “We used to be an engineering company. We're becoming a management company. "Unfortunately, the company is designed to sell engineering, not management. Not a good sign.

I do not have an MBA and I have not taken MBA-like classes, but I have read a lot trying to find solutions for the management problems that I see in my department, that is, create a culture of learning, how information is disseminated. across an organization, establishing trust, creating a common language to execute faster, etc. I have the impression that most of the traditional MBA curriculum is extremely rigid and asks you to simply copy and paste without the need for independent thought. It's goal-oriented project management rather than focusing on innovation / tinkering.

I believe that if you want to be hired by a start-up company, you will have to contribute much more than just your traditional MBA courses. In general, startups seem to try to be the exception to the rule. You need to show that you understand the boundaries where your formal MBA education no longer applies and that you have the ability to adapt and create something new in terms of business management to match the way they are trying to innovate with whatever product they are want. re-create.

Perhaps most importantly, you will have to SHOW them what you are capable of, not just tell them. Even as an engineer, a resume is not good enough to get hired. Most companies request a design portfolio, a link to a github repository, or a blog so they can see what kind of work it will provide for them. Especially in small companies, hiring even one person can have a huge impact in terms of whether the company succeeds or fails, culture, and internal frictions.

Just my thoughts ...

In my experience, for us Chinese students who have had higher education in China or here, obtaining a second degree in Computer Science or a diploma in computer technology from SAIT and having a 4-month internship experience would allow you to find a well-paying job no matter what field your degree is in. I know some Chinese students whose majors are English, history or any other liberal arts area transferred to computer programming and 100% have high paying jobs.

Joe earned a doctorate in geology from the University of Alberta and was unable to find a job in his specialty.

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In my experience, for us Chinese students who have had higher education in China or here, obtaining a second degree in Computer Science or a diploma in computer technology from SAIT and having a 4-month internship experience would allow you to find a well-paying job no matter what field your degree is in. I know some Chinese students whose majors are English, history or any other liberal arts area transferred to computer programming and 100% have high paying jobs.

Joe earned a doctorate in geology from the University of Alberta and was unable to find work in his area of ​​expertise. But he found a computer programming job after learning very easily a year of diploma study in computer technology at SAIT in 1997. My background in biology and I have a master's in biological sciences. Except for a biological technician, what else can I do? I studied at SAIT for 16 months and became an independent IT consultant for a large oil and gas company.

I remember in the past when I was riding the C train, I saw the advertisements on the side wall of the train. They were recruiting unit employees for the hospital and other companies. I checked the ABH websites, the hourly pay is pretty good. Why not give it a try? If I were several years younger, I could give it a try.

It is very common for a person to be unable to find a job in their degree field. If you have a PhD, you just need to take several computer courses or go to SAIT to get your diploma, then you will be fine. Of course, there are many other careers that anyone can enter without any particular education and eventually earn 6 figures in 5 to 10 years if they stay focused, such as sales, project management, marketing, public relations, writing (copywriting). advertising, technical writing). , etc.), operations management, HR, personnel selection, etc., based on a career expert (1).

He said that “I majored in Finance but ended up becoming a Recruiter in the biotech and pharmaceutical industries. I didn't know anything about science, I just took the job and learned. But I ended up earning really well as a recruiter, talking to Ph.D. scientists and learning a ton about that industry. "

The most successful salesperson in one of my previous jobs was making $ 1 million per year (yes, working on commission in sales can be incredibly lucrative) and had an English degree. I think the second best man had a degree in history.

So focus on landing an entry-level job at a company with good leadership and strong growth. You will be in a growing environment and will be able to get promoted quickly. You can join as an associate, learn the ins and outs, and then move on to Project Management once you understand your system. Or you can join as an assistant in Operations and then become a Manager and then a Director. (1)

These are 15 jobs that can pay you high without needing a degree. Check the attached source n. 2.

  1. Commercial pilots. Median annual salary: $ 78,740.
  2. Detectives and criminal investigators. Median annual salary: $ 79,970.
  3. Elevator installers and repairers. Median annual salary: $ 79,480.
  4. Air traffic controllers. Median annual salary: $ 124,540.
  5. Funeral service managers. Median annual salary: $ 78,040.
  6. Nuclear power reactor operators. Median annual salary: $ 93,370.
  7. Energy distributors and dispatchers. Median annual salary: $ 82,510.
  8. Power plant operators. Median annual salary: $ 77,180.
  9. Nuclear medicine technologists. Median annual salary: $ 75,660.
  10. Nuclear Technicians. Median annual salary: $ 80,370.
  11. Radiotherapists. Median annual salary: $ 80,570.
  12. Media and communication team workers. Median annual salary: $ 79,500.
  13. First-line police and detective supervisors. Median annual salary: $ 87,910.
  14. First-line supervisors of fire prevention and suppression workers. Median annual salary: $ 76,170.
  15. Transportation, storage and distribution managers. Median annual salary: $ 92,460. (2)

You are sure to find a well-paying job if you don't give up. Try to connect your knowledge and skills that you have learned in your degree field with the job requirements and qualifications of what you are looking for. There must be some connection for those two fields that don't seem to have any relationship. For example, a person looking for a computer job with a degree in English might say that they know how to organize an article effectively and it is very similar to the design and organization of writing code. Writing code is like writing an article that you need to first design and organize your thoughts to make paragraphs and functions, then you have to edit and modify the article so that it reads smoothly, as well as debugging your code to make it work.

Remember to keep learning in your new position, updating and advancing with the times always.

Thank you for reading.

Sources:

  1. What To Do When You Can't Find A Job In Your Field: 11 Smart Ideas
  2. 15 Jobs Paying Over $ 75,000 You Can Get Without a Bachelor's Degree

I will share my experience. I literally interviewed several hundred accounting beginners because, in my previous job, I represented my company (IT Major) on various campus placement teams. After so many iterations, I started asking just one technical question along with another conversation. Here, I used to give the interviewee a pen and paper and start like this: “We have a fixed asset originally purchased for Rs. 10,000 and the accumulated depreciation is Rs. 6,000. Now we are selling the fixed asset for Rs. 3,000. Write complete journal entries for sale. "

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I will share my experience. I literally interviewed several hundred accounting beginners because, in my previous job, I represented my company (IT Major) on various campus placement teams. After so many iterations, I started asking just one technical question along with another conversation. Here, I used to give the interviewee a pen and paper and start like this: “We have a fixed asset originally purchased for Rs. 10,000 and the accumulated depreciation is Rs. 6,000. Now we are selling the fixed asset for Rs. 3,000. Write complete journal entries for sale. "

Most of the time the answer started "Fixed asset account Dr. …………"

To tell you honestly, most college graduates failed.

When I set up my CA practice, I continued with the same question to select articulate learners. I'm sorry to say that out of more than 40 students I had interviewed, only one girl was able to answer correctly.

I believe that we must work towards a good quality accounting education in this country.

Well, I have the same thoughts as you and my choice is to develop in the venture capital investment (VCI) industry.
As for me, VCI is really interesting and can make you understand the world better. In terms of pay and pace of work, I think VCI is much better than the investment banking industry.
But if you want to work in the VCI industry and don't want to take investment banking as the VCI way of working, you can focus on developing your skills in product design or a special understanding of certain industries. For example, first go to Google and then to Sequoia

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Well, I have the same thoughts as you and my choice is to develop in the venture capital investment (VCI) industry.
As for me, VCI is really interesting and can make you understand the world better. In terms of pay and pace of work, I think VCI is much better than the investment banking industry.
But if you want to work in the VCI industry and don't want to take investment banking as the VCI way of working, you can focus on developing your skills in product design or a special understanding of certain industries. For example, first go to Google and then to Sequoial. During the transition process, you have to do improper work at Google and networking in the VCI industry.

Yes, they have goals for closing positions or any HR-related activity, but compared to other fields, they won't have a lot of headaches about deliverables and POCs. Most HR has to tie into future planning of ongoing projects and close resource-based requirements earlier. But sometimes a tense situation happens where they have to provide the replacement in a very limited time, which could be an exception but a nightmare as it takes longer for the release date of a particular project.

For the most part, in multinational companies there are HR groups under different managers who have different responsibilities and create collaborations

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Yes, they have goals for closing positions or any HR-related activity, but compared to other fields, they won't have a lot of headaches about deliverables and POCs. Most HR has to tie into future planning of ongoing projects and close resource-based requirements earlier. But sometimes a tense situation happens where they have to provide the replacement in a very limited time, which could be an exception but a nightmare as it takes longer for the release date of a particular project.

Mostly in multinational companies there are HR groups under different managers who have different responsibilities and create a collaborative effort monitoring table to meet the different needs of the organization. CMMI batch level policies are for the HR group and partners collectively referred to as the resource group for a particular SBU business unit with proper planning and management.

But mostly they have limited work to keep the balance of WL compared to other technical staff.

Thanks for A2A. But you asked the wrong person. I don't support the attitude.

When you get to Economics, if there is a job like that, many people who do not want to work but want a lot of money will compete for it. When there is a great supply of people for that job, the demand, the value of the work and the remuneration will go down. So the market is set at the salary that the job deserves.

However, despite all this, I can think of a career that fits the criteria. Swamiji or some religious teacher!

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