What are some notable "red flags" to look for in your first few days at a new job?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Eve Byers



What are some notable "red flags" to look for in your first few days at a new job?

Remember that you should always judge a book by its cover, and that everyone who works in the company should bow at your feet because you are new and therefore you know absolutely everything.

As a woman on Tinder, I have learned many red flags. If I see any of these, I don't answer and block them, here are a few to consider (from a female point of view):

  1. Any guy who starts his first greeting outside the door with a "Hello sexy" or "Hello beautiful!" I want to scream, "THE NAME IS CAROL!" But that would be a deeper conversation and I won't do it before blocking them! I guess they are boring married men who want to start a sexting conversation.
  2. If these Bozos want to get off Tinder and start texting, they immediately want more photos! Excuse me ... you've seen a lot ...
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As a woman on Tinder, I have learned many red flags. If I see any of these, I don't answer and block them, here are a few to consider (from a female point of view):

  1. Any guy who starts his first greeting outside the door with a "Hello sexy" or "Hello beautiful!" I want to scream, "THE NAME IS CAROL!" But that would be a deeper conversation and I won't do it before blocking them! I guess they are boring married men who want to start a sexting conversation.
  2. If these Bozos want to get off Tinder and start texting, they immediately want more photos! Excuse me ... you've seen a lot ... YOU WANT TO MEET in person (in a public place of course!)!
  3. They want my email address. I have enough penpals and I don't want any more! They live 20 miles from my city and they never suggest meeting! HEY? What's up with that? I imagine a morbidly obese guy living in his parents' basement!
  4. Oh, and the guy in the picture is dying to send me a beautiful color photo of his (?) Wrong male Member. Eeew! I'm not amused or interested!
  5. -Then there are the scammers… oh yes the scammers! They are supposed to be men who usually live in Nigeria or Malaysia. His main goal is to earn your trust and also your money. Since Tinder is a free site, it is packed with them!
  6. They always want to get you off the site for a deep conversation. They always ask the same questions: What experiences have you had with other men on this site? What am I looking for here? Am I married and alive? only? I used to mess with them. I once told one that his supervisor needed to give him different questions to ask. Say ah!
  7. If you call them on the phone, they have a strong Nigerian accent. They always call you baby because they can't remember your name.
  8. Well, these are just a few examples from the minefield of online dating and, in particular, Tinder.
  9. As always, this is "THE WORLD ACCORDING TO CAROL"!
  10. Bye Bye

Q: What were some "red flags" that new hires shouldn't ignore when starting a new job?

This is written from the perspective of a permanent member of staff in a non-public sector position in England / Europe, where employment protection is very different than in the US.

Here are a few that I have come across, more personally:

  • Excessive trial periods,
    eg. Eg 6 months, during which no benefits are paid, without labor protection
  • High staff turnover.
    If you were hired to replace someone, you will find that you left for reasons you don't want to explain, which become apparent over time. A staff survey is conducted and
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Q: What were some "red flags" that new hires shouldn't ignore when starting a new job?

This is written from the perspective of a permanent member of staff in a non-public sector position in England / Europe, where employment protection is very different than in the US.

Here are a few that I have come across, more personally:

  • Excessive trial periods,
    eg. Eg 6 months, during which no benefits are paid, without labor protection
  • High staff turnover.
    If you were hired to replace someone, you will find that you left for reasons you don't want to explain, which become apparent over time. A staff survey is conducted and more than half of the staff say they intend to leave within two years.
  • Equipment mismatch, poor quality equipment, or poor budget.
    Sometimes the favored few can get very nice laptops and monitors, and others have things that wouldn't even sell on eBay - in fact, you might find that a lot of equipment was bought on eBay!
    When you waste a lot of time fighting broken equipment, you can clearly see that it's a false economy, productivity and morale are suffering, but management doesn't care.
  • The employment contract is significantly different from the offer letter.
    A job offer letter usually describes key points, such as salary, probationary period, salary increases after probation, etc., but this can be overridden by the contract, which is the document that you actually sign, so the letter is just false promises.
  • Unexpected weekend / night work or on call.
    It may not have been mentioned that after hours work is required, but you are suddenly expected to check emails and / or answer the phone at any time, without financial consideration. Rotations may not be available and you may be considered to be available at all times.
  • Breach of benefits.
    Benefits like pension, health care, etc., which were discussed in the interview, were only being considered and turned out to have been wishful thinking. Or postponed indefinitely because they were only going to make some provision for legal reasons that became moot.
  • Overqualification.
    You are overqualified for the job, you didn't realize because the salary is fine, but the job seems pretty mundane with little prospect of developing new skills. Turns out their predecessor was useless, so they aimed much higher, too high, this time.
  • Complex systems, zero documentation, zero induction / handover.
    The company has extremely complex internal processes or systems that have little or no documentation, and there is no induction or handover, leaving you "in the deep end" trying to figure out what to do. For negative bonus notes, make those systems temperamental or brittle, so that any change, no matter how trivial, is likely to break things. Throw in a bit of blame culture and you've got the perfect recipe for misery in the new job.
  • Senior management that cannot or does not want to delegate.
    Despite intermediate levels of management, the CEO insists on approving all decisions, interferes at all stages, and reverses decisions on a whim that had been made by people with specific experience in a role to make those decisions.
  • Very hierarchical, very compartmentalized.
    Despite professing to want staff who can "think outside the box" and be "entrepreneurial", the business is highly hierarchical and compartmentalized, and their mandate is heavily outlawed and specifically told that it is not their place to make decisions, or "not your pay grade."
  • Do not deliver.
    The company seems to be very busy doing things, but has basically failed to finish any new and ready-to-ship products.
  • Tolerance of colleagues and toxic divas.
    There are people in the company who have toxic behaviors such as bullying, negativity, rudeness, narcissism, etc., but they are tolerated because they are friends with someone in high places or because the company feels that they are too important to control or fire them. .
  • High level of absenteeism.
    Staff are often ill and it becomes clear that it is due more to stress than illness, which could be accompanied by toxic behavior from colleagues.

those are just the first things that come to mind, I can go back and add more. Edit: I added half a dozen more over time as I recall previous jobs that I have had. Last updated October 2020.

Wow. There are so many…. Where to start?

I'll look at this in general: can I be friends with this person (?), Rather than the specific red flags for a deeper romantic relationship (which has more potential deal breakers). These flags are also valid for romance.

Level One Red Flags:

  • Closed mentality. More specifically, uncompromising ignorance. This means that we will not be compatible. Things you don't know about are best viewed as an opportunity, not as something to be avoided.
  • Meanness. After meeting my favorite psycho here, I realize that empathy is not necessary to be <not bad>. So this became e
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Wow. There are so many…. Where to start?

I'll look at this in general: can I be friends with this person (?), Rather than the specific red flags for a deeper romantic relationship (which has more potential deal breakers). These flags are also valid for romance.

Level One Red Flags:

  • Closed mentality. More specifically, uncompromising ignorance. This means that we will not be compatible. Things you don't know about are best viewed as an opportunity, not as something to be avoided.
  • Meanness. After meeting my favorite psycho here, I realize that empathy is not necessary to be <not bad>. So this became even more non-negotiable for me. If you're bad, we're done.
  • Controller. Yeah, any smell of this and I'm off.
  • Consent issues. If one does not understand the agency of others, we cannot be friends. This is related to controlling behavior, but it is its own red flag.
  • Right. Act like you deserve things and I'm not going to find much in common. Gratitude is based on wonder. Ownership becomes expectation. It's ugly.
  • Selfishness. I understand that it is something necessary for survival, so it is not an automatic breaker of the deal, but when that flag goes up, it stays on and increases the sensitivity of the trigger cables for other flags.
  • Egocentrism. No, big fat man.
  • Narcissism. This is not the same as trust. This isn't even arrogance, although I can't take that shit. No. It's the feeling of an energy vampire sucking your life out of you. It's a toxic need and I can't bear it. It is not necessary to have NPD to display this behavior. So don't throw away that term, okay?
  • Greed. This is related to some of the others already listed.
  • Elitism Oh. Are you better than the others for a status symbol? Fuck off. Shitty bonus points if you act like this makes you more important and therefore entitled to mistreat others.
  • Sexism I don't care how you identify yourself, if you're obsessed with putting people in boxes based on their genitals, we can't be friends.
  • Fanaticism. Get out of here with that.
  • Racism. Holy shit. No.
  • Religious fervor. Unless, perhaps, you are a fervently practicing Sikh. I have never seen abusive and proselytizing people following this dogma. Everyone else must stop and let people be who they are without the poison. This kind of state of mind can't be close to me. This tends to be related to behaviors in many of the other flags already listed.
  • Mental laziness. Don't you like to think because it hurts? We can only be so close.
  • Scientifically skeptical. Don't you believe in science? Yes…>.>
  • Conspiracy theory. Just stahp.
  • Wealthy. I know this will be controversial, but it has been my unfortunate experience that great personal wealth tends to be correlated with many of these other red flags. It also means that one may not have any kind of understanding of the reality of almost <all the other people in the world>. It's exhausting trying to explain this to people who live in a bubble. So it's a red flag, but not necessarily a deal breaker (when the other flags are up too, bye). It is at least theoretically possible that one can be rich and still not have a closed, elitist mind and have the right…. I just haven't found it yet.
  • Disloyalty. Oh, do you like to gossip and talk about people and smile at their faces? Go away.
  • Cognitive dissonance. This is sure to be a deal breaker.
  • Passive aggressiveness. No.
  • Traditionalist. If the only reason you can give me to do something is "I've always done it that way," and you find it comforting, valid, and something to strive for as your status quo, we're not going to be around.

So yeah, it's pretty easy to see why I have a small inner circle. Some of these are factors that break agreements with a single flag. Most of these are breakers of coexisting agreements. But here is a short list of my most used red flags. It's also easy to see why the people in my inner circle are so valuable to me - they are legitimately wonderful human beings.

Imagine if someone asked you "would you invest in this company?" Your answer will be similar. With a few additions.

Here is the checklist that I would follow:

A) Has the CEO built a business before?

This is not always reliable (Mark Zuckerberg or Larry Page had not created a business before) but there is an interesting statistic:

85% of startups fail. If the CEO has built and sold a startup before, the odds drop to 25%. So you might as well have the stats on your side.

B) Does the company have good financing?

By good financing I mean two things:
a. Enough money to last at least a year.

And for him

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Imagine if someone asked you "would you invest in this company?" Your answer will be similar. With a few additions.

Here is the checklist that I would follow:

A) Has the CEO built a business before?

This is not always reliable (Mark Zuckerberg or Larry Page had not created a business before) but there is an interesting statistic:

85% of startups fail. If the CEO has built and sold a startup before, the odds drop to 25%. So you might as well have the stats on your side.

B) Does the company have good financing?

By good financing I mean two things:
a. Enough money to last at least a year.

And by the way, this is an important thing to keep in mind: if the business has six months or less of funding, THEN THEY ARE ALREADY OUT OF BUSINESS. This is why the "A" above is so important. Good CEOs know it.

B. "good funding" means people (or funds) who will also write second checks. If all they have is a year of money for friends and family, then you risk running out of money in a year. Why take chances when there are so many other good jobs out there?

And, I'll add a third additional thing on this: it shows that they are the type of company / CEO that can raise money, sell their vision, etc.

C) Do you believe in the vision?

This can mean a number of things.

a) The CEO is creative enough to develop a strong vision and is also a good enough communicator to convey that vision.

b) Would use the product (if the product were applicable to you)

c) You cannot use the product, but you can easily see how this product can help a million or more people.

I will set a good example and a bad example.

Good example: Tesla. I would work for Tesla if you believe in Elon Musk's vision of reducing the need for fossil fuels, or if you want to drive a Tesla, or if you believe that everyone who drives an electronic car (and has an electric wall) will help a million or more . people.

Bad example: someone came up with an idea where consumers can choose the type of ads they see. I DON'T see how this would actually help a million or more people. So I wouldn't work for a company like that (and by the way, they had a lot of investors).

I recently invested in a startup that developed a technology to vape vitamins and drugs. I USE the product (I vaporize B12 with it, vitamin D and trans-reservatrol). And I can easily see how this can help a million or more people (the entire United States is vitamin D deficient and people's bodies cannot digest vitamin pills (by the way, I'm not trying to get anyone interested in this is already fully funded).

D) Valuation.

Presumably you are getting options at a startup, and based on the value you contribute, those options will increase.

How do you know if your last round of valuation is good?

Forget for a second the money they raised (we took care of that).

But imagine that you have, in cash, the amount of your total valuation. Would you be able to create a better product with more traction? For example, for $ 46 billion, could it beat Uber? It is not clear to me. But there are many startups where, if you give me your full cash valuation, I can easily see how they can be replaced.

Don't work for a company that is easily replaceable with a lower valuation.

# 2 consideration. If you believe in valuation, make sure your options are not at the venture capital price, but at the "409A valuation" price. Google that.

E) Learning

There is a great story about Sergey Brin interviewing people. You usually know in the first few minutes if you are not going to hire someone.

So, spend the rest of the interview making sure you learn at least one thing from the interviewee.

Make sure that even in the worst case scenario, where you misjudged everything else, you at least learn one thing pretty quickly after taking the job so that it adds to your skill set and you can move on to get a job. I work better.

I once took a job at HBO (not a startup, but still) where I learned so much in a three-year period that I was able to take on the skills (ranging from technology to entertainment to television production) that I was able to quit and start. a successful company.

G) Subtleties.

I visit many companies a year for various reasons. I always look for the subtleties.

a. How are the partners lengthened? For example, a company in which he was about to invest was a co-CEO situation. I heard one of the CEOs gossiping about the other. I did not invest.

The entire culture of a company comes from the top down. So if the partners who started the business do not have their emotional act together, the company itself will not be emotionally sound.

B. How do employees talk about customers?

Read the biography of the JetBlue founder. He stayed until 3 a.m. every night responding to customer service emails.

Once a month he would take one of the longest airplane rides and he would start at the back of the plane and go to the front, sitting with each passenger and asking them if they had any problems with the flight. In fact, he hired employees that way.

That's the CEO, but everyone in the company should have that attitude toward customers. A year ago I visited a law firm where they were tearing up their clients and making jokes about it. That is not the type of company you would hire, work for, invest in, etc.

A company and its customers are ONE ecosystem. Not "us against them".

C. your boss and your boss.

Lots of bosses make hiring decisions based on "would you ride a cross country plane with this guy"?

You must make your decision in the same way about your potential bosses. Trust me, they need you more than you need them. So you have to like them.

Also, rethink the ecosystem - try looking at your relationships with other people in the company. All gossip is bad. Hopefully they have a good opinion of the people they work with. Otherwise, you shouldn't work for them and you shouldn't work for that company.

H) Demographic trends.

Warren Buffett is not a value investor. Everybody thinks it is, but it hasn't made any real value investments since the early 1960s.

Warren Buffett is a demographic investor. Two quotes from Buffett:
"If a company is going to be here 20 years from now, it's probably a good move to buy."

and

"If you have a strong demographic wind at your back, the company will do well even with poor management."

Example: The book "Bold" lists many demographic trends taking advantage of Moore's Law and getting bigger. Robotics, Internet of things, 3D printing, etc. That is a beginning. Another start is companies that are disrupting healthcare, as that's a disaster right now.

Another example: I'd rather work for Uber than a company that lends money for taxi medallions. I'd rather work for AirBnB than Marriott.

I'd rather work for Tesla than GM.

I) Light at the end of the tunnel

You cannot ask in your interview, "when will you do your initial public offering?"

It is unpredictable when a company will "go out" (that is, it will be sold or IPO or have some event that allows employees to sell some of their shares).

A good company can wait 7-10 years before leaving. In fact, a good company MUST wait 7-10 years.

How? Because if they are good, they are undoubtedly growing faster than the market. Therefore, they should remain private as long as possible to maximize shareholder / employee benefits.

Here is the problem. The average employee stays at a startup for 3.1 years (maybe that corresponds to the vesting schedules, I don't know).

Make sure you can wait that 7-10 year period. Also, I would try to find out if management is ultimately interested in an exit. Some CEOs are not.

J) Eventual benefits.

Make sure you see the path to profitability. Some startups could take years.

But the great thing about working for a company that ultimately has large margins (not just profits, but margins as well) is that they have many advantages.

Just compare the chef at Google with the chef at Walmart. Hint: There is NO chef at Walmart.

-

This seems like a great checklist before deciding to work for a startup. But don't forget that YOU are the valuable person here.

Take care of all your needs and then you will have more freedom, you will be able to demonstrate greater competence in your work and you will have better relationships with the people you work with.

In other words, you will be happy.

And that's a good reason to take a job.

I agree with Michael and Phil.

On a different note, your first few weeks will establish or at least begin to establish your reputation with the company. I tell people that you have six months. If you arrive early during that time, people will almost always say that you are early. So this is a good time to help others. You want to be the best there is during this time.

Note that the reverse is also true. If you complain about your desk, how cold it is, etc., you will be labeled a complainer.

The first few months is the time to start with good habits. Start making a list of the things you

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I agree with Michael and Phil.

On a different note, your first few weeks will establish or at least begin to establish your reputation with the company. I tell people that you have six months. If you arrive early during that time, people will almost always say that you are early. So this is a good time to help others. You want to be the best there is during this time.

Note that the reverse is also true. If you complain about your desk, how cold it is, etc., you will be labeled a complainer.

The first few months is the time to start with good habits. Start making a list of the things you want to do and work with your boss to prioritize them. Get organized.

Also, be careful about saying things like: "At XYZ Company we did it this way ..." You must be careful not to step on the fingers of others. Be humble and don't assume they know your motivation for asking questions. Many people take questions (especially from a new person) personally. If you ask "why do we do it that way?" Be sure to ask "I'm just asking because sometimes it's always been done that way and other times there are reasons I'm not aware of" or something similar. You may want to wait to change a few things. If you make or suggest any changes, be sure to show people WHY you think it should be done differently.

After about six months, the honeymoon is over.

Thanks for the A2A. Good luck and don't forget to be awesome!

Hey everyone ! First of all, good luck to the questioner! You asked a good one.

I am not an experienced one. I am still studying and I am quite young for work too, but I still feel that in the 21st century everyone should think about their career and the future consequences in that particular.

So here I go without wasting time.

There should be the following things to remember on the first day.

  1. Always keep in mind that "work is worship"
  2. It doesn't matter which institute or university you come from. How smart and average or below that can he be. Everyone is going to be the same in the workplace, except their salary level.
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Hey everyone ! First of all, good luck to the questioner! You asked a good one.

I am not an experienced one. I am still studying and I am quite young for work too, but I still feel that in the 21st century everyone should think about their career and the future consequences in that particular.

So here I go without wasting time.

There should be the following things to remember on the first day.

  1. Always keep in mind that "work is worship"
  2. It doesn't matter which institute or university you come from. How smart and average or below that can he be. Everyone will be the same in the workplace, except at the salary level. So feel free and confident to explore your inner spirit.
  3. The most essential part is "Always keep the learning spirit" because every day of life has new things to teach you. So good luck observing new things and learning them.
  4. Never try to be overly clever with your top associates. It will hurt you in every way if you don't respect them because experience is always greater than education in my sense. When there is a tight margin situation, experience will help a lot there. So respect them and their seniority.
  5. Prioritize your work over friends and social networking sites. Family is an exceptional case here.
  6. Be passionate enough about your work
  7. Never mess with the boss. He is your promoter.
  8. Maintain a healthy friendship for everyone, but don't be too close because anyone can bite you.
  9. Love yourself and be enthusiastic

Well. I am done with all the points. The above all are my point of view. If you like it, go ahead and if you can't do what you want

Good luck anonymity again ☺️

All of this happened to me, sometimes multiple times:

  • You arrive on the first day of work and your supervisor is on vacation and no one knew you were coming.
  • You arrive on the first day of work and they don't have a desk for you, no computer, and no account set up.
  • On the first day, you have to install a huge environment to compile the code, but there is no documentation and everyone is too busy to help. The only way to find what you need is to start a "compile all" and see what breaks. This is a painful iterative process. When your code is compiled, it doesn't run because it needed t
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All of this happened to me, sometimes multiple times:

  • You arrive on the first day of work and your supervisor is on vacation and no one knew you were coming.
  • You arrive on the first day of work and they don't have a desk for you, no computer, and no account set up.
  • On the first day, you have to install a huge environment to compile the code, but there is no documentation and everyone is too busy to help. The only way to find what you need is to start a "compile all" and see what breaks. This is a painful iterative process. When your code is compiled, it doesn't run because it needed to load an outdated version of some library. Also, no one has told you how to run the code, so how do you even know when it's working?
  • On the first day, while waiting for a big build to run, you search for documentation and discover that there are only nine pages of documentation for the entire five-year project.
  • On his first day, as his boss, the founder of the company shows him around, shows him a small PBX made by TelRad, an Israeli company, and goes off, saying, and I quote: "Damn Jews, they think they do." you are God's chosen people… ”From then on, things got worse. He did not like Jews or blacks. I thought Asians were almost as smart as whites. He had hired me because I was older (and white and male) and could serve as a role model for his son, another developer. It was the biggest embarrassment of my work life that I didn't get out there.
  • You find out (not the first day, in my case) that the toilet paper on the floor where you work is a useful but rough budget brand, while the toilet paper on the floor where the CEO works is soft and fluffy.
  • The first day you learn that the person who hired you and who runs your office is not your manager. Your manager is someone you have never met who works 1,200 miles (1,930 km) away in San Diego.
  • On your first day, the manager of the small startup you have come to work for shows you a set of servers comprising about 500,000 lines of code that crashes multiple times a day, and says it should only take about six weeks. fix it.
  • On the first day, your boss says, "Any senior software engineer should be up to speed (on our raw, undocumented code base) in two weeks."

Here are some feel-good confirmations that you've chosen a good company to work for:

  1. We welcome you and introduce you to the people you will be working with.
  2. Your desktop is set up, with email and everything you need to get started.
  3. There is someone to take care of you, a person you can turn to at any time if you have questions.
  4. You are included in briefings, short team meetings, invited to the month-end meeting and the annual planning session.
  5. Have the opportunity to share your ideas and your new approach. To be heard.
  6. Feel part of the team, incorporated in the ideals of the future
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Here are some feel-good confirmations that you've chosen a good company to work for:

  1. We welcome you and introduce you to the people you will be working with.
  2. Your desktop is set up, with email and everything you need to get started.
  3. There is someone to take care of you, a person you can turn to at any time if you have questions.
  4. You are included in briefings, short team meetings, invited to the month-end meeting and the annual planning session.
  5. Have the opportunity to share your ideas and your new approach. To be heard.
  6. Feel part of the team, incorporated in the ideals of the future of the company.
  7. A career path is established for you and discussed with you to help steer your career in the right direction. Something to which you aspire and feel comfortable with the direction your career is taking.
  8. You will feel that there are opportunities for growth and enjoyable projects that will stimulate your mind and talent base. A future that includes progress and well-being for you as a person.
  9. A company in which you feel recognized and cared for, while being financially rewarded in a way that is worth the effort and time.
  10. A place where you feel exhilarated, excited, challenged, and right at home.

What are some red flags for a new hire in their first week?

Los nuevos empleados deben estar atentos a cualquier diferencia marcada entre lo que dice su capacitación y la práctica real.

This is a real problem: what’s the sense of training a new employee to X when the reality is Y?

This is indicative of a serious gap between proclaimed values vs reality.

Red flags…a LOT of new(ish) employees, especially in management- usually indicates there is a high rate of quitting/firing…

Many employees that are “grumpy’ or not very friendly…hard to work as a team with people who don’t want to be there!

Green flags- friendly employees and management, return customers, Most of the people working there have been there more than a year or two: indicates happy and well-treated (and paid) employees!

Other Guides:


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