What are some lower-level programming jobs that people can start with? Not everyone can work on Facebook, Google, etc.

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Reuben Daniel



What are some lower-level programming jobs that people can start with? Not everyone can work on Facebook, Google, etc.

Updated to match the rephrased question:

Basically, there are no overlooked entry-level developer roles in tech companies. Perhaps you have a better chance of entering a company that sells a technology product that is not very popular or well-known, but that lack of fame leads those companies to not need as many new developers year after year. Perhaps targeting something adjacent to the developer, like QA or IT operations, will allow you to compete against fewer people, but it is also often quite difficult to go from a non-developer role to a developer role. Honestly, if your goal is to create software, you are probably

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Updated to match the rephrased question:

Basically, there are no overlooked entry-level developer roles in tech companies. Perhaps you have a better chance of entering a company that sells a technology product that is not very popular or well-known, but whose lack of fame leads those companies to not need as many new developers year after year. Perhaps targeting something adjacent to the developer, like QA or IT operations, will allow you to compete against fewer people, but it's also often quite difficult to go from a non-developer role to a developer role. Honestly, if your goal is to create software, you're probably better off looking outside of technology. There are so many more potential jobs, and some of them are just as difficult as the tough jobs in tech companies. I mean, Do you think it is simple and straightforward to maintain Walmart.com | Save money. Live better. running 24 hours a day, 7 days a week,

Original question / answer:

Q: What are some lower-level programming jobs that people can start with?

A: Facebook, Google, etc. They are not top tier jobs compared to non-FAANG companies, although they certainly do include some pretty complex jobs for those who are interested.

I know a guy who, last I knew, was doing software QA at a logistics company, not Uber, Lyft, or something similar. My first software job was in the Sales Division of a company that sells a lot of nitrile gloves to hospitals and almost everywhere else, you may well have seen their logo at your doctor's office. I was helping move the team that tracked and paid out the FoxPro sales staff compensation to .NET. There are also jobs at places like Target: Expect More. Pay less. (I've even heard nice things about them as long as you like Minneapolis), insurance companies, schools, Christian churches / denominations, vitamin supplement companies, and student loan processors.

Do you want to get one of these jobs? The first step is not to restrict your search to technology companies. Many organizations need at least some software written and maintained. In the US, I've always found it helpful to work with recruiters, but don't be fooled by working with only one recruiter at a time. Job searches, like dating and sales, are a numbers game, as long as you don't undermine your ability to be successful. Get an application for enough job opportunities that you could perform well and you will eventually get something, especially if you are pleasant to talk to and are willing to take on a variety of IT and software development tasks.

Keep in mind that only the smallest percentages of programmers work in a FAANG company. Think about it logically. There are tens of thousands of software development companies and companies in other industries that have software development departments or divisions. What you are talking about is a total of 5 companies.

For true entry-level tech and programming jobs, I tend to recommend that people not bypass the federal government. They are known for routinely hiring entry-level staff and providing excellent on-the-job training and mentoring. And while the salary will be defined

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Keep in mind that only the smallest percentages of programmers work in a FAANG company. Think about it logically. There are tens of thousands of software development companies and companies in other industries that have software development departments or divisions. What you are talking about is a total of 5 companies.

For true entry-level tech and programming jobs, I tend to recommend that people not bypass the federal government. They are known for routinely hiring entry-level staff and providing excellent on-the-job training and mentoring. And while the salary will definitely be lower than that of the private sector, the benefits will be much better. So much so that many people start out in the federal service and decide never to leave. And it's not like they're stuck ... the federal government is incredibly broad on what it covers. And, you may even have the opportunity to work a nice and comfortable job overseas (I worked with countless federal employees while I was a defense contractor for the US military living in Europe.

But what's even more important than the benefits for someone just starting out are the explicit career progression guidelines. You know exactly what you have to do to get to the next rung of the ladder and exactly how long it will take you to do it. And it doesn't matter if you regularly go out to lunch with the boss, dress the right way, speak with the right accent, etc. You will climb that ladder if you do your job.

Amazon L4, Apple ICT2, Facebook E3, Google L3, Microsoft L59, and similar top-tier software engineering positions at other large companies.

Everyone needs too many programmers to hire only experienced engineers.

In contrast, smaller companies are more likely to avoid inexperienced people.

Most companies conduct interviews the same way we've done for the past 30 years, aside from a possible question or two that reflect the current fad: current dynamic scheduling, estimation questions during the rise of Google ("How many golf balls can hold a school bus? "). and puzzle questions when Microsoft was dominant ("Why is it a

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Amazon L4, Apple ICT2, Facebook E3, Google L3, Microsoft L59, and similar top-tier software engineering positions at other large companies.

Everyone needs too many programmers to hire only experienced engineers.

In contrast, smaller companies are more likely to avoid inexperienced people.

Most companies conduct interviews the same way we've done for the past 30 years, aside from a possible question or two that reflect the current fad: current dynamic scheduling, estimation questions during the rise of Google ("How many golf balls can hold a school bus? "). and puzzle questions when Microsoft was dominant ("Why is a manhole cover round?").

Large companies simply make the process more formal. Question banks and interviewer training are more likely, so you will probably have no luck with a new engineer who thinks reversing a string is a good question or is unlucky with problems that require an "aha!" moment. Sometimes interviewers don't make the hiring decision, so biases are less likely to interfere with candidate selection.

FAANG companies get more attention because their products are widely used, some offer nice benefits, and reportedly pay very well.

What are some lower-level programming jobs that people can start with? Not everyone can work on Facebook, Google, etc.

I encourage you to view jobs at less prestigious companies for what they are: less prestigious, lower paid, but not lower level. In fact, by working for a lesser-known company, you may have more responsibilities than you would at Google.

To find out which companies are hiring programmers, there are many sources:

  • Attend job fairs at your school
  • Check with your school's professional services office.
  • Post on social media; maybe your friends and acquaintances know
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What are some lower-level programming jobs that people can start with? Not everyone can work on Facebook, Google, etc.

I encourage you to view jobs at less prestigious companies for what they are: less prestigious, lower paid, but not lower level. In fact, by working for a lesser-known company, you may have more responsibilities than you would at Google.

To find out which companies are hiring programmers, there are many sources:

  • Attend job fairs at your school
  • Check with your school's professional services office.
  • Post on social media; maybe your friends and acquaintances know good opportunities
  • Do a LinkedIn search
  • Sign up for Stack Overflow jobs
  • Check out forums related to your field - for example / r / cpp has a thread of quarterly papers

If you really feel that, as an applicant, you don't "stand out" enough to be hired at one of the Big N tech companies, then you should be prepared to apply to dozens of lesser-known companies. It would not be unusual, for example, to apply for 50 companies, get 5-10 interviews and 1-2 offers.

There are many other companies where you can work as a programmer. And you are not correct when you write that everyone cannot work on FB. Yes, everyone can work on FB. Even you or me.

But I will never work for them because I don't love working for similar companies. I love working for cash and that's why I work for companies where I can earn $ 1,000,000 a year. Yes, you are right. Blockchain companies pay for that.

I can teach you what you need if you want to learn about blockchain and Python.

OQ: What are some lower-level programming jobs that people can start with? Not everyone can work on Facebook, Google, etc.

LinkedIn and Glassdoor are good guides for finding companies that need coders in your community, even if that community isn't San Francisco or New York. In fact, dot-coms are a good search engine too, but watch out for the spammers lurking there.

Good luck, we could all use a little.

Not to be too dramatic, but a lot of blood, sweat, and tears. Especially that last one.

These are the steps I followed, mostly in order:

  1. In my opinion, of course, I had a reasonably strong foundation of algorithms and data structures from the courses I took in undergrad. This helped me a lot. In that regard, I highly recommend Introduction to CLRS Algorithms.
    The book has a lot of mathematically rigorous tests that you probably won't need, but it covers all the algorithms and data structures that you might encounter in a technical interview.
  2. Outside of the basics, you need to know
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Not to be too dramatic, but a lot of blood, sweat, and tears. Especially that last one.

These are the steps I followed, mostly in order:

  1. In my opinion, of course, I had a reasonably strong foundation of algorithms and data structures from the courses I took in undergrad. This helped me a lot. In that regard, I highly recommend Introduction to CLRS Algorithms.
    The book has a lot of mathematically rigorous tests that you probably won't need, but it covers all the algorithms and data structures that you might encounter in a technical interview.
  2. Outside of the basics, you need to know what a technical interview looks like and what to expect. I'm sure there are 100 other answers on Quora alone that mention Cracking the Coding Interview, but I'm going to do it one more time because it's that good. The preparation strategy and the explanation of how the interviews work are very valuable in my experience.
  3. At this point all I really needed was practice and I learned it the hard way. Back in the fall of 2017, Google, Facebook, Amazon, and most of the other tech companies you've probably heard of turned me down for a summer internship.
    I spent the summer improving my technical interview skills, also known as Leetcode. I will admit that this is not for everyone and that you really only need to solve several different types of questions to cover most interviews.
    Personally, I enjoy competitive programming and problem solving, so I solved over 250 problems and this gave me the confidence to address most of the questions posed to me.
  4. Fortunately, I had plenty of time over the summer to work on a pretty good side project and I would recommend anyone applying for a software engineering position to do the same. Bonus points if you put it on your Github for recruiters / interviewers to see.
  5. Technical interviews are obviously very important. However, cultural fit is something that is often overlooked. You will likely have at least one cultural adaptation interview where you will be asked about past experiences, projects you worked on, and people you collaborated with. I framed the answers to the questions related to my experiences and I think that was very helpful.
    This is also a good time to ask your own questions about the company and how it works. Genuine questions, please inquire beforehand. Generic questions can make it seem like you're not particularly interested in working there.
  6. Finally, you just have to go out there and do your best. I hate to admit it, (because it seems like an excuse) that luck is a pretty big factor in interviews. Sometimes it's just not your day and it's okay. Learn what you can from the experience and keep moving forward.
    You don't need to be lucky all the time, you only need to be lucky once.

I was lucky in August 2018 after a year of failures, when I interviewed Facebook for a full-time software engineering position.

"Be humble. Be hungry. And always be the hardest worker in the room." - Dwayne Johnson

(My favorite quote, imagine)

Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution for the same problem and t

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Practice data structures and algorithms safely. I got a job offer from Google Warsaw right out of college. I mostly credit my experience of participating in many coding contests for that, as it helped me develop great problem-solving acumen. I will post my Google interview experience here:

I contacted a recruiter I knew to schedule full-time SWE interviews.

I had my first round online in October 2018. I was asked an easy tree problem and I was able to do it in 30 minutes. We then discussed how we could parallelize some of the parts of my solution to the same problem and the interview concluded.

My second round online was in November 2018. If I remember correctly, it was about finding a way in a BST. We discuss the case in multiple ways, etc. and then I was able to find a semi-optimal solution. My interviewer gave me a hint and I was able to find the optimal solution and code it way ahead of time. I made it through this round and was invited for on-site interviews in London.

My on-site interviews took place in December 2018. In fact, I went to the wrong Google office in the morning! But since I left early, I had some extra time, so I ran to the right office and was able to arrive at the last minute. He was supposed to have 4 algorithmic interviews and a Googliness interview.

My first interviewer showed me the office. Then the rounds of interviews began.

For my first round I was asked a medium difficulty bit manipulation question. This round was pretty good and I was able to finish the round 5 minutes early.

For my second round they asked me a graphic question. I explained my solution and they asked me to write the code to build just the graph instead of solving the whole question. This round also went quite well.

Next, I had the googliness round. It's basically a behavioral round, so they asked me questions like what are my expectations when working at Google, what criteria do I use to prioritize projects, etc. This round was meh because I don't have a lot of work experience so I was only able to give slightly vague answers to questions. But I wasn't too worried because I think it's an experimental round that only happens in some Google offices (London is one of them).

I had my lunch break, ate light.

The third round was the hardest. It was a graphic question about permutation rings. It took me a bit of time to find the solution and I wasn't really sure about it. But the interviewer said my test was fine, so I coded it. I had 1-2 trivial errors that I fixed after the interviewer pointed them out. I think this was my strongest round as tough questions can go a long way in distinguishing algorithmic ability and my competitive programming background helped a lot here.

The fourth round was based on trees and basic probability. It was easy-medium and I was able to code without any errors so this round went well too.

After the new year I got a call from my recruiter saying that my interview scores were good enough to move on to the host search phase. In this phase, my recruiter basically tried to find a team on Google for me. I was paired with the Google Cloud team in Warsaw and got my offer in April.

As you can see, most of my rounds were based on data structures and algorithms, so my experience in programming competition helped a lot in clearing these rounds.

I recommend that you start entering coding contests right away. To get started, look at some of my answers:

Sameer Gulati's answer to How should I get started in competitive programming?

Sameer Gulati's answer to What made you good at competitive programming?

About 2-3 months before the interview, switch to troubleshooting at Leetcode, CareerCup, etc. to gain experience in solving interview problems. Having a little experience in competitive programming will make solving these problems much easier for you.

TL; DR: Java.

Having interned at Amazon and currently at Microsoft, I can give a little insight into the languages ​​you can learn to start an exciting career as a software engineer (excuse me if you are looking for advice on how to be a data scientist or other kind of engineer )! :)

Java is the main development language at Amazon, but there are some teams that use Python, C, C ++, Ruby, etc. If you are new to programming, it can be a challenge to learn Java, but Amazon tends to let you only choose between Java, C, and C ++ for their interviews, so I would recommend learning Java if you specify

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TL; DR: Java.

Having interned at Amazon and currently at Microsoft, I can give a little insight into the languages ​​you can learn to start an exciting career as a software engineer (excuse me if you are looking for advice on how to be a data scientist or other kind of engineer )! :)

Java is the main development language at Amazon, but there are some teams that use Python, C, C ++, Ruby, etc. If you're new to programming, it can be a challenge to learn Java, but Amazon tends to let you only choose between Java, C, and C ++ for their interviews, so I would recommend learning Java if you specifically want to work at Amazon.

At Microsoft, the languages ​​used are somewhat varied, but C # is what you will probably use as a software engineer there. C # is very similar in syntax to Java, so learning one will make the other easier to learn. When I interviewed with Microsoft, I used Java, but I heard from people who used other languages ​​like C ++ and Python with no problem. However, to be better prepared for the job, C # / Java are good choices if you will be working primarily on the back end.

For Google / Facebook, I have seen friends who have interviewed on Python and Java, but use a variety of languages ​​in their work, such as Hack (dialect of PHP according to interwebs), Java, some Javascript framework, etc. But don't worry, you DO NOT have to learn all those languages ​​to be successful, you can learn them on the job.

In my opinion, Python would be the easiest language to start learning because it has very low overhead. However, the industry leans more towards static typing languages ​​(where the type of a variable is defined as $$ int x = 4; $$ instead of $$ x = 4; $$). This makes sense because as you build your product or service, you need to know exactly what types of input and output you'll be dealing with, and a host of other things. Java also has a lot of documentation and is widely used in the industry, not just the companies mentioned. Knowing Java will also help you get other jobs.

Good luck, and even if you don't work at the companies you mentioned, you will definitely find the journey to being a software engineer enjoyable! : D

I "studied" for 30 years for an interview at Google.

Although I didn't call it studying; I called it work experience.

My point is that the skills required to pass a Google interview are not unique to the Google interview process. If you have been a reasonably efficient and busy software engineer for a few years, it is very possible that you will go into a Google interview without specific preparation and get a job offer. That's what happened to me.

You will be asked to troubleshoot. If you've been a busy and effective software engineer in your career, you've already solved far more difficult problems than anything else.

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I "studied" for 30 years for an interview at Google.

Although I didn't call it studying; I called it work experience.

My point is that the skills required to pass a Google interview are not unique to the Google interview process. If you have been a reasonably efficient and busy software engineer for a few years, it is very possible that you will go into a Google interview without specific preparation and get a job offer. That's what happened to me.

You will be asked to troubleshoot. If you've been a busy and effective software engineer in your career, you've already solved problems far more difficult than anything Google can throw at you in a 45-minute interview session. And remember that your main goal is to solve the problem, not to show your knowledge of obscure features of the programming language. When I interviewed, I switched between C and Python for troubleshooting sessions depending on which one was more appropriate for the problem, because it's not about showing how every last bit of C functionality can be extracted. If a different language works best for problem, use it. In my last job before Google, I actually ported a C program to Python to make the program easier to maintain.

You may be asked about your knowledge of a topic. For example, if you claim to be an expert on a particular protocol, you may be asked some non-trivial questions about that protocol. If your experience is consistent with what you say, you will quickly answer those questions. But if you spread the truth, well, you might have problems. Don't claim something on your resume as expert knowledge if you spent a week on it five years ago.

In short, you need the equivalent of AT LEAST a few months of study to pass a Google interview; a few years would be much better. But if you've done some non-trivial software engineering, that counts as a study.

Top-tier software companies get hundreds of candidates for every person they interview; there is so much incoming data that good candidates get lost in the flood of resumes.

The easiest way is to have previously worked with someone who now works there and ask them to recommend you.

Otherwise, focus a lot on your resume and on a page or two (no more), present the best version of yourself. I wouldn't worry too much, or not at all! - about a cover letter, but what the resume says shows you can get the job done.

Both Google and Facebook seem to be looking for two things:

  • Can you code in a language they use, or
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Top-tier software companies get hundreds of candidates for every person they interview; there is so much incoming data that good candidates get lost in the flood of resumes.

The easiest way is to have previously worked with someone who now works there and ask them to recommend you.

Otherwise, focus a lot on your resume and on a page or two (no more), present the best version of yourself. I wouldn't worry too much, or not at all! - about a cover letter, but what the resume says shows you can get the job done.

Both Google and Facebook seem to be looking for two things:

  • Can you code in a language they use or something similar? Are you familiar with data structures and algorithms?
  • Can you design larger systems? Do you ask questions, do the tradeoffs well, and accomplish what you were asked to do?

Facebook (rather than Google) also seems to be looking for a third category for engineers:

  • Can you communicate well, do you work well alone and in a group, and would you be a decent human being to be stuck with in an airport? Are you a leader who can push things forward on your own and / or push things organically across teams or even entire organizations?

Finally, honestly, there are a few things with bonus points that could help, and might not, depending on the recruiter and other things:

  • PM signal: does it make business sense? Can you make sound business decisions?
  • TL Signal: Have you ever taught classes or tutorials, or played a leadership role?
  • Co-worker wins: volunteer / community service, etc.

There are also red flags:

  • All but the toughest certifications ... probably count against you as they are not valued and are taking up space on your resume, diluting all of your other accomplishments. If a certification could be completed in less than a month, it may not be listed.

I'm sure there's more to it than that, but there's also a ton of resume-building stuff online; It doesn't feel sane to try to put them back here. Good luck!

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