What are some jobs that pay pretty well but don't look like it abroad?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Oliver Wood



What are some jobs that pay pretty well but don't look like it abroad?

The oil and gas industry has countless men without college degrees who earn more than 100,000 a year.

If you are really looking for something amazing yet easy to do in life, do your research on the professions listed below.

1.Bed heater

Nobody wants to get into a cold bed. And also, if you are unsure about electronics, the night could become difficult for you. In such situations, hiring a Human Bed Warmer might be the best alternative.

Yes… a human bed warmer… There is nothing cheesy about this job. Everything is professional.

Although it must cost you a lot, if you watch from the other side, you can gain good just by lying on the bed.

2. Recovery of aircraft

Airplane repo men a

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If you are really looking for something amazing yet easy to do in life, do your research on the professions listed below.

1.Bed heater

Nobody wants to get into a cold bed. And also, if you are unsure about electronics, the night could become difficult for you. In such situations, hiring a Human Bed Warmer might be the best alternative.

Yes… a human bed warmer… There is nothing cheesy about this job. Everything is professional.

Although it must cost you a lot, if you watch from the other side, you can gain good just by lying on the bed.

2. Recovery of aircraft

Aircraft repositories are, although an interesting job, but also dangerous at the same time. They will have to investigate, track, recover, gracefully, deliver aircraft and gracefully. The aircraft repository manager must be a good pilot licensed to fly all types of aircraft. You may have to fly a private jet, a rusty seaplane, a traffic helicopter, a twin-engine propeller plane, or even a 747, a duster. With so many types of aircraft, an aircraft repositories need to be able to fly just about anything.

3. Snuggled

Snugglers are hired to hug them, need a hug? .... Hire a professional Snuggler, you can find them through calls. They can work with people of all ages. Although people may have the wrong impression regarding your profession. It is so clear to them that you are a professional hugger and will not engage in sexual activity.

4. Astronomer

Many people misunderstand the theory of astronomy with the notion of disbelief. But it is a science, which focuses on specific questions and gives the answer from the movement of the Universe.

This job is very interesting and can earn you a lot of money.

5.Golf recovery

Golf Retrievers are the ones who recover the ball when the player misses it. They can also be professional recyclers. And you can win up to $ 15, that's a pretty good amount. Many people work as golf retrievers. What can be better than exercising and earning money at the same time?

6. Master marijuana extractor

An official certification process is not necessary. To become an excellent marijuana extraction technician, you must have real-world experience, but you will earn enough rewards for your efforts. As a marijuana extractor, you can earn up to $ 80,000-120,000 per year.

7. Hot dog cart vendor

Americans spend $ 2 billion a year on hot dogs, according to the Sausage Council. Although it is incredible that a salesman of hot dogs makes six figures a year. The reason behind this is that startup costs are easily within reach and the markup on hot dogs and associated products can be heavenly.

8. Online dating ghostwriter.

In the last twenty years, online dating has reached a different platform where they make $ 3.2 billion per year. According to a survey, 49 million singles have dabbled in online dating at least once in their lives, but still, to get a better impression, people started hiring professional ghostwriters.

Hello,

As a master NLP trainer, here are some topics that I would like to discuss, if I may:

There are no correct answers to incorrect questions. What questions should you be asking that you haven't already asked? I highly recommend doing a lifestyle audit and examining the values ​​you hold.

a) If you work 70 hours a week, you are probably experiencing physical exhaustion. The body has its own way of making you aware that you are pushing the limits and that doing so has serious consequences for the future.

b) Independence seems to be important to your working life

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Hello,

As a master NLP trainer, here are some topics that I would like to discuss, if I may:

There are no correct answers to incorrect questions. What questions should you be asking that you haven't already asked? I highly recommend doing a lifestyle audit and examining the values ​​you hold.

a) If you work 70 hours a week, you are probably experiencing physical exhaustion. The body has its own way of making you aware that you are pushing the limits and that doing so has serious consequences for the future.

b) Independence seems to be important to your working life. Is it possible to sit down with your employers and have a difficult conversation, the one that leaves no room for maneuver?


I need some room to breathe, to be, to function creatively, to work with my talented colleagues in a way that contributes to the immense potential here. The working environment for me is ....... If I don't get it, here are some of the things that concern me (and list them) ... really spend some time on the problem.

If their talents are valued, they will make the time. If not, you will have to consider other options.


c) Before talking to them, explore your own criteria for the next 10 years of your life in detail:

What do you want to have achieved? What will being in this job do for you? What won't it do for you?

70 hours a week leaves no room for a worthwhile emotional and family life.

What value do you place on your health?

How much money is enough? Obviously, you are talented enough to do your own thing. Can you create your own company in which the work environment is determined by your criteria?

What is important for you?

What makes your heart sing?

What makes you get up in the morning?

This is not a superficial exercise. Take it seriously. Do some research and take control of your life. Your future well-being and health depends on it.

Find a coach or mentor who can help you negotiate challenges in a way that is useful, meaningful, and helps you unlock the potential you want to use.

Good luck.

Do you feel like all the good jobs are already taken?

Tired of spending hours searching for endless job boards to find a job that pays well and is not as boring as heck?

Well, the good news is that there are literally hundreds of thousands of jobs out there, and not all of them make you want to bang your head against a cold, hard desk in a cubicle.

In fact, there are some that are exciting and offer great salaries.

We've grouped a few of them based on the hottest job market trends below to help get you started on your job search.

Ocularist

You've probably never heard of an ocularist, but their jobs are

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Do you feel like all the good jobs are already taken?

Tired of spending hours searching for endless job boards to find a job that pays well and is not as boring as heck?

Well, the good news is that there are literally hundreds of thousands of jobs out there, and not all of them make you want to bang your head against a cold, hard desk in a cubicle.

In fact, there are some that are exciting and offer great salaries.

We've grouped a few of them based on the hottest job market trends below to help get you started on your job search.

Ocularist

You may have never heard of an ocularist, but their work is critical when a person suffers a traumatic injury or illness that affects their eyes. Ocularists are responsible for building, fitting, shaping, and maintaining artificial eyes for the people who need them. While they obviously don't restore vision, they provide an easier way for people to adjust to life without their eye.

As skilled technicians, they use incredible technology and equipment to provide their patients with the best artificial eyes out there. Once the artificial eye is built and painted, it fits into the existing muscle in the eye socket so that the patient can move the eye in a similar way as they would the real eye.

Salary: $ 60,000 to $ 100,000 or more, depending on Comparably.

Required Education: An Ocularist is required to take training and undergo an apprenticeship program with the American Society of Ocularists (ASO), which comes with a 5-year time commitment.

Pharmacology Technician

Pharmacy Tech is probably a job you've heard of before, but you may not know how much money they make. These pharmaceutical professionals work with pharmacists to prepare and distribute medications. They are responsible for taking prescriptions over the phone and in person and act as intermediaries between pharmacists and the public. This position combines science, medicine, and customer service for what many consider a satisfying job.

Salary: $ 20,775- $ 40,759 according to PayScale.

Education required: 1 year in an accredited pharmacy technician program.

Hearing aid specialist

You probably already know what a hearing aid specialist does - they work with people to find the right hearing aid for them. In addition to evaluating their patients' hearing, they also keep accurate records of their patients and make recommendations for other products that they could benefit from. If you like helping people and are passionate about medicine, this could be your career.

Salary: $ 50,250, according to US News.

Required Education: All that is required for this job is a high school diploma or GED. You can learn through on-the-job training with an audiologist and you can also take a certification program to increase job prospects.

Industrial psychologist

Here's one you probably haven't heard of: the industrial psychologist. If you already have some formal training and education in the field of psychology, then you might be interested in this position. Industrial psychologists apply psychological theories to workplace problems, such as those found in marketing, sales, and human resources.

Salary: $ 72,350 according to Salary.com

Education required: Bachelor of Psychology with an apprenticeship.

Compliance officer

Listen to us, the role of a Compliance Officer can be quite interesting. Your job is to make sure that companies follow the correct regulations and policies. There are many ways this could be exciting, especially if you discover a serious violation of a policy or regulation. Keep an open mind. You might like it, especially when you take home that beautiful paycheck!

Salary: $ 65,640 according to GlassDoor.

Required Education: Bachelor's Degree in Finance, Criminal Justice or Business.

Labor market trends are not the end, everything is everything

There are so many options available to you as a worker, and no matter where you are in your career, you don't have to keep up with labor market trends in hopes of landing a good job. Right now is the best time to change careers or start your first. We hope these jobs inspire your search and help you secure an exciting and rewarding career!

"Looking for spots?" Looking for places where? You mean the employees? "Spot" and "employee" are two different things.

A stain doesn't mean what you seem to think it means here.

Second, the jobs are not looking for employees. Companies do it. Companies are looking for employees to fill jobs / job vacancies.

Usually (sorry to be so sarcastic, but if you honestly want to know, this is the cold hard truth) a profession that pays $ 100,000 a year or more will be one that requires really good reading / writing skills. Particularly in terms of knowing the definitions of words and how to use them correctly.

Unless one is a level master

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"Looking for spots?" Looking for places where? You mean the employees? "Spot" and "employee" are two different things.

A stain doesn't mean what you seem to think it means here.

Second, the jobs are not looking for employees. Companies do it. Companies are looking for employees to fill jobs / job vacancies.

Usually (sorry to be so sarcastic, but if you honestly want to know, this is the cold hard truth) a profession that pays $ 100,000 a year or more will be one that requires really good reading / writing skills. Particularly in terms of knowing the definitions of words and how to use them correctly.

Unless one has a master's level in a blue-collar technical job, such as plumbing or electrician. Even then, the precise vocabulary and meanings of the terms are important to getting the job done correctly (although accurate grammar and spelling may not be as important).

Lastly, "reasonable", what exactly does it mean? That is a very subjective word.

My mom always says that "anything worth having is worth working for."

Simply put, it is 99.99999999999% sure that people are not going to get out of HS and will magically get the 6-figure corner office job a year just for having a pulse. Most people have to put in some work and education to get a good paying job.

EDIT: Despite my request to separate the questions, Quora Moderation has decided to keep this question paired with what I originally answered: "What are some jobs that don't justify salary?" What I have written does not make sense as an answer to the new question, but the good people of Quora do not seem to understand that they are completely different questions.


Mine! And possibly yours too.

The justification for the income of any individual is found in the free market value of his labor production. That is, a fair income is obtained when the employee (or employer) is willing to contribute

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EDIT: Despite my request to separate the questions, Quora Moderation has decided to keep this question paired with what I originally answered: "What are some jobs that don't justify salary?" What I have written does not make sense as an answer to the new question, but the good people of Quora do not seem to understand that they are completely different questions.


Mine! And possibly yours too.

The justification for the income of any individual is found in the free market value of his labor production. That is, a fair income is obtained when the employee (or business owner) is willing to provide services at the same price that the employer (or client) is willing to pay for those services, without artificial demands from outside parties. Most of these external distortions are government creations:

  • Taxes. I believe that there are some legitimate functions of government at various levels, and I support that taxes are necessary to fund those functions. My argument here is against the distortions that come from an extremely inequitable tax code.
    • Progressive income tax policies reduce the marginal returns to the highest wages; If the natural price of your labor is just above the limit of a certain tax bracket, you will choose to work slightly less and stay in the lower category, or you will demand artificially higher wages to make up for the additional amount lost to taxes.
    • Tax breaks granted to specific industries, corporations, or even specific events (think movie making) allow those companies to inflate their salaries relative to competitors.
  • Compulsory licenses, certification, etc. Conceptually, government licenses should be made on the basis of protecting the public from significant harm, especially when it comes to health problems (although even here I think there are good arguments against compulsory licenses). Now, governments demand all kinds of ridiculous professional licenses: hairdressers, public accountants, interior designers, contractors, etc. Who asks states to implement those licenses? There is no public outrage that these industries are riddled with incompetence and dangerousness. People who want to enforce licensing / certification programs are those who benefit financially from those licenses: companies with established practices,
  • Industry regulations. This one cuts both ways. Compliance in a heavily regulated industry generally means hiring (or hiring) people to ensure that a company is doing what the government wants. Therefore, you have to pay a significant amount of money to people who do little or nothing to improve the value of your company / product. Meanwhile, there is less money available to compensate the people who are actually doing the work.
  • Government competition against the private sector. In the name of reducing the cost to the public or making something more available to consumers (both are typically fallacies), governmental or quasi-governmental institutions place the burden of financial risk on the general public, while often distorting the profits of the employees. by those institutions. Higher education is one of the best examples I can think of here, especially when it comes to income from administrators and sports departments. Some of those salaries might be appropriate for their free market value, but since taxpayers fund so many other things that go on at the institution, it's hard to know if that soccer coach is really worth the millions of dollars they are being paid.
    • Public sector unions are a particularly bad actor here. Matthew Bates pointed to the ridiculous pension packages being given to retired administrators of Illinois public schools. It is inconceivable that we have allowed unions and politicians to collude against taxpayers for benefits that could not otherwise be justified.

So let's look at a few different jobs and think critically about whether the jobs really reflect a "market price."

  • Doctors. A 2017 survey showed median earnings for physicians of $ 294,000. Pediatricians are on the low side averaging $ 202,000, while orthopedic surgeons averaging $ 489,000. What determines your earnings? Almost all of a doctor's income comes from a third party, be it a public or private insurance plan. Insurers have reimbursement programs that base their rates on things like how many tests are requested, how much time is spent with a patient, the complexity of the patient's health problems, and more. Lately, there has been a major push to create a system that pays for results rather than job input, although this is an overly simplistic approach to a very difficult problem. I will not go into all the other problems that affect our healthcare system, Except to note that the regulatory burden is increasing exponentially. further increasing system costs. My point here is that there is a huge distortion in physician compensation because the consumer is actually two parties: the patient and the insurer. The patient, who initiates the transaction and receives the product, has a very different motivation than the insurer, which pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . who initiates the transaction and receives the product, has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . your employer selects your insurance and pays most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . your employer selects your insurance and pays most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. .
  • Minimum wage employees. Not only do minimum wage laws skew the price of menial work, they also make it difficult for employers to structure their compensation plans to offer scheduled raises and financial incentives for quality work. The average McDonald's employee lasts about 3 months. I'm curious what that number would be if a franchise owner could pay $ 6 / hour when hired, but with a planned increase to $ 8 / hour at 3 months and $ 10 / hour at 6 months. It may also include some performance bonuses. Who knows where the correct starting salary is, what should be the timing and amount of raises and what might be the right incentives for performance? What works for one restaurant (even in the same company) is probably not suitable for another restaurant, and is almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! And it's almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! And it's almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! 25 / hour means they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! 25 / hour means they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary!
  • CEOs, CFOs, Presidents, Vice Presidents, and all the other corporate baddies. Few people have such a complex salary structure as large corporate executives. There is a base salary. There are bonuses, both guaranteed and based on performance. There are common stock payments, but there are also stock options. Who determines how much the person is paid and how is that payment structured? These determinations are typically made by the company's board of directors, which often acts as a proxy voter for the shareholders. Ideally, those pay structures are geared towards company performance: CEOs win or lose while companies win or lose. If that's the setup, then your salary is pretty much justified, i.e. they are paid for the value they bring to businesses. Unfortunately, there are a lot of distortions here too. Stock value is often used as a proxy for other measures of company performance, so the focus of some executives is to manipulate the stock price, rather than creating a good product and competing well in the market ( Does anyone remember Enron?). Twisted performance incentives can also lead to shady corporate accounting and even fraudulent practices (hello again, Enron). The worst, however, is when large corporations achieve and maintain their "success" by securing political favors that allow them to force their competitors or issue large salaries without actually producing anything of value (ahem, Solyndra). I do not believe in the idea that all executives in large companies do not deserve their salaries. I just warn that there are enough bad players on the market,
  • Professional athletes. Of all the examples I give here, professional athletes may actually have salaries that are the closest reflection of their market value. Certainly there are some distortions, for example, different leagues have requirements for a benchmark minimum wage. There are also some significant distortions in the way owners can finance those wages; I have a particular problem with the notion that taxpayers are hooked on building arenas / stadiums in most circumstances. But, if you look at the contract between the player and his employer, there are many market forces at play. See Also - John Nagel's Answer to Why Major League Athletes Make So Much Money

There is no job that fits your question, as is already clear from the previous answers. Considering your question, I guess you want to do as little as possible and don't want any hassle, or at least as little hassle as possible :)
So I would think of something that:

  1. suits your area of ​​expertise (!) forgot to mention your expertise
  2. you can do / do once and sell many times.
  3. needs few customer services and cannot be returned
  4. needs little mechanical support and cannot be damaged
  5. It is exclusive, so you may charge a higher fee (teaching and writing, I personally would not recommend as you do not pay t
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There is no job that fits your question, as is already clear from the previous answers. Considering your question, I guess you want to do as little as possible and don't want any hassle, or at least as little hassle as possible :)
So I would think of something that:

  1. suits your area of ​​expertise (!) forgot to mention your expertise
  2. you can do / do once and sell many times.
  3. needs few customer services and cannot be returned
  4. needs little mechanical support and cannot be damaged
  5. it's exclusive so you may charge a higher fee (teaching and writing, personally wouldn't recommend as you don't pay much if it's not really good)
  6. does not dirty your house.

In the above lists there are several interesting suggestions. I would consider:

  • consultant, although you would still need to get out of your house from time to time to build your network and get to know your clients.
  • intraday trader (needs a lot of knowledge, experience and luck)
  • SEO / Social Media Marketing Consultant
  • teach something special (like swimming example)
  • 3D printing artist. You built a model once and sold it many times through the 3D printing store.
  • Etsy artist (selling through Etsy)
  • and finally programming. Programming can be learned from home and it can be done from home. In fact, sites like Odesk are great places to sell your services (digital, but also others).

Good luck!

Umm ... It sounded like first world mentality ... Easy money, little effort.

While the people of my country are totally opposite. Our ideology is the other way around ... Count on me, any job that pays.

The work at Crocodile Farm in Thailand is unthinkable. Although the pay is peanut, there used to be a long waiting list for healthy young Thais whose aspiration is "No mountain too high to cross, no mouth too big for the head."

“Samutprakan Zoo was hell on Earth for the animals, but thanks to PETA, WFFT, and online pressure from concerned people around the world, their prolonged suffering

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Umm ... It sounded like first world mentality ... Easy money, little effort.

While the people of my country are totally opposite. Our ideology is the other way around ... Count on me, any job that pays.

The work at Crocodile Farm in Thailand is unthinkable. Although the pay is peanut, there used to be a long waiting list for healthy young Thais whose aspiration is "No mountain too high to cross, no mouth too big for the head."

"The Samutprakan Zoo was hell on Earth for the animals, but thanks to PETA, WFFT, and pressure online from concerned people around the world, their prolonged suffering will finally come to an end," said PETA Senior Vice President Jason Baker./Coconuts Bangkok

“To his horror, a second after the handler put his head into the crocodile's mouth, the crocodile closed its jaws and a brief struggle took place until the handler was able to free himself ... The owners of the crocodile farm say that this was the first time such an incident has occurred on this farm ”/ - Richard Barrow - Surely it will not be the last.

The true hero of the zoo has been hailed as an outstanding artist with a proud record, just 300 points after 20 years, while his former apprentice is a rising star who hits him with just 100 points to the head. There are 12 daring stunts that make Hollywood stunts look like a hobbyist.

"That job pays a lot, but it's still worth every penny," is my answer.

I think the sales are very, very interesting. If you can close a deal and a social butterfly, sales should be the first option. Get a degree anyway (a lot of engineers are salespeople) and drive yourself good cars by dressing up and pimp your product. And it pays well if you're good at it.

Web developer is a very interesting job. High school students who drop out of school buy a mac, learn JavaScript, and do it. However, it is better to get a CS degree or degree, the webdev life can be stressful and you will need it later. Get really good at RoR, JavaScript and have a spectacular GitHub profile and can do anything and

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I think the sales are very, very interesting. If you can close a deal and a social butterfly, sales should be the first option. Get a degree anyway (a lot of engineers are salespeople) and drive yourself good cars by dressing up and pimp your product. And it pays well if you're good at it.

Web developer is a very interesting job. High school students who drop out of school buy a mac, learn JavaScript, and do it. However, it is better to get a CS degree or degree, the webdev life can be stressful and you will need it later. Get really good at RoR, JavaScript and have a great GitHub profile and can do whatever you want.

Any type of trade is interesting and you need a trade school and an apprenticeship for it. It's an art.

Personal trainer sounds like an interesting job. Along with military or any kind of physical work. However, you eventually get a degree.

Of course you can be an entrepreneur. And earn millions. I don't need a title for that. But it is necessary to work long hours a day and work for peanuts for many years. Eventually it pays off.

So many options are just the ones I can think of.

What may interest me probably would not interest you, and vice versa. Often times, it is not the job necessarily that is well paid, but the position one has that determines the salary. I know many accountants who earn very little and some who earn a lot of money. Either way, he wouldn't be interested. There are some players who make a lot of money using their talents, but most don't, and that's certainly not a field I'm interested in. There are some boxers who make a lot of money, but most do not and again, that is something that does not interest me. Owning a restaurant or bar can be very

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What may interest me probably would not interest you, and vice versa. Often times, it is not the job necessarily that is well paid, but the position one has that determines the salary. I know many accountants who earn very little and some who earn a lot of money. Either way, he wouldn't be interested. There are some players who make a lot of money using their talents, but most don't, and that's certainly not a field I'm interested in. There are some boxers who make a lot of money, but most do not and that is again something that does not interest me. Owning a restaurant or bar can be very lucrative, but that doesn't interest me either. Being a politician can pay off very well, but again, I'm not interested. Being a male model may interest some and it can be very lucrative,

The following jobs are physical, high-paying jobs:

  1. Surveyors
  2. Avionics Technicians
  3. Boilermakers
  4. Responsible for solar energy installations
  5. Cartographers
  6. Mechanical supervisors
  7. Electrical Engineering Technologists
  8. Metro operators
  9. Oil pump operators
  10. Aerospace Engineering Technicians

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