What are some jobs that make $ 80,000 per year that don't require college?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Bailey Burke



What are some jobs that make $ 80,000 per year that don't require college?

There are many, but getting started can be very difficult. Anything computer related outside of hardware design and development, but you must be able to prove yourself. Firefighters and police do quite well too, some require a degree, but military training can sometimes prevent this. My dad was a mechanic and he was in a union and he did better with just a high school degree. Several of his friends did well as unionized dockworkers or in construction. Specialized equipment operators can really clean if they have enough hours, i.e. crane operators. Any sales job has that potential.

There are only a few careers with the potential to reach that level of income, and for the most part, they require a great deal of sacrifice. $ 500k / yr is a number that is foreign to nearly 99% of the total US population, and the truth is that most salaried positions will never make it to that point.

Well, let's get to that, there is a common theme between these races; You have to: 1) generate income, 2) take on heavy responsibilities, 3) be highly specialized, or 4) own

  • Corporate Law (aka "BigLaw") - Corporate attorneys working for the largest firms have a path to the $ 500k / year mark if th
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There are only a few careers with the potential to reach that level of income, and for the most part, they require a great deal of sacrifice. $ 500k / yr is a number that is foreign to nearly 99% of the total US population, and the truth is that most salaried positions will never make it to that point.

Well, let's get to that, there is a common theme between these races; You have to: 1) generate income, 2) take on heavy responsibilities, 3) be highly specialized, or 4) own

  • Corporate Law (aka "BigLaw") - Corporate attorneys working for the largest firms have a path to the $ 500k / year mark if they are lucky enough to participate in the firm's association. Entry requirements in the US are generally getting into a T14 (top 14) law school, being above average in your classes, and kicking butt out of your classes on things like law review, club leadership , etc. you back $ 150k + in loans.
    • Starting membership as an associate now has a bonus of $ 190k +, but you will work towards it, doing more than 60 hours a week is not easy by any means, but if you can walk it down the 7 to 8 year path to association you will have visibility to earn $ 500k or more. Do you remember our previous categories? This is included in the categories of ownership and income generation.

NB: in the UK, it is not necessary to have gone to law school. Usually you would apply for a training contract agreement with a company, then they would sponsor your 1-year training course (if you studied law) or both the 1-year training course and the 1-year law conversion course.

  • Investment Banking (also known as "IBD") - Investment banking is the legendary path to conventional success in the world of "vanilla" finance. He's captured loads upon loads of top-notch college graduates because of his optionality, the allure of working in "high-profile" deals, the prestige, but best of all the money. If you're at a target or semi-target college and you have the right grades, CV (or resume as Americans call it), personality traits, and hunger, you could land an internship offer with the potential to turn it into a full-time job. Curro. Students who are not the target also enter frequently, especially if they make contacts.
    • Initial total compensation generally falls somewhere between $ 100-200,000 during the 2-3 years you are an analyst, this increases to $ 200-430,000 as an associate, then $ 350-750,000 as a vice president. Starting with VP, the role becomes strictly income-generating and your compensation is completely tied to how well you and the bank perform.
    • The hours start off awful, with most analysts working 75-80+ hours a week on average, peaking at 100 or more. However, the older you get, the more your hours decrease and the more visibility you have about your schedule. However, travel increases substantially
  • Sales, Negotiation and Structuring + Research (also known as "C&T", "Securities" or "Markets") - Similar to the IB in that the schools and pedigree are quite the same, however these roles are very different. The markets side of a bank is a complete meritocracy, its advancement and, by extension, compensation is a function of how much money it can make. As you begin, you will be following seasoned salespeople, traders, and structurers, but as you go, you start to get your own business book. Sky is the limit in terms of payment, as it is normally paid a% of what it produces.
  • The Buyside (HF, PE, VC, AM):
    • HF ("Hedge Funds"): There are all types of hedge funds ranging from systematic / quantitative to fundamental. Typically, you will need to dedicate time to IB, Consulting or a combination of the above + Private Equity to have a chance to raise the more 'fundamental' funds and have experience in trading the more 'macro / specific products' funds. However, some funds (especially quantitative) recruit outside of the undergraduate degree. Same as trading, if you work for a decent sized fund and it yields, it will hit $ 500k / yr.
    • PE ("Private Equity") - A junior banker's wet dream, you will most likely need top-notch banking or consulting experience to enter this area. However, some companies hire people who do not have a bachelor's degree. In larger funds, with 2-3 years of experience, you can generally get an all-inclusive compensation package of $ 250-300k a year (with a few outliers above that) and in smaller ones, $ 150 to 250 thousand a year. Suffice it to say as you move up the ranks this will increase exponentially as you start to earn transferred interest points, it is not unreasonable to exceed $ 500k / yr after 5 to 8 years of being in the industry.
    • AM ("Asset Management") - Large companies often recruit for investment positions outside of undergraduate and high school, however some are drawn from IB / Research. Initially you work as an analyst, move up from junior to senior, and finally you are given the opportunity to become a portfolio manager. Senior and PM analysts with decent-sized funds earn well over $ 500k / year
    • VC ("Venture Capital"): Similar to PE, but more inclined towards ex-entrepreneurs. Senior investment professionals and partners with decent-sized venture capital funds earn over $ 500k / year, especially when accrued interest is taken into account.
  • Executive Management - If you play office politics right, whether you start in engineering, HR, finance, etc., you will have the potential to land in an executive position after more than 15 years of experience in a field. You start as a Director, work your way up to Director Sr, VP, and finally SVP / EVP or a Boss position. Vice presidents of medium and large companies earn more than $ 500,000 a year
  • Medicine: Certain specialties of medicine such as orthopedic surgery, neurosurgery, plastics, anesthetics, etc. they can generate salaries in excess of $ 500k / year. The problem is that you have to go through 8 years of school, where you accumulate a lot of debt and then another 6 to 8 years of intense training with low wages before you can earn a high salary.
  • Software Engineering: Some companies (Google, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, Netflix, Uber, etc.) are disbursing total compensation (salary + shares + bonus) of more than $ 500k / year to senior engineers, but the way to get there is opaque. It requires starting your own business and being acquired, or working on high-profile projects. The new graduate compensation now costs ~ $ 130-180k, and the requirements are quite strict. You will need a high level of technical competence to have a chance at one of the interviews here.
  • Sales: High-end sales of high-priced products - Human Capital (headhunting), luxury goods, real estate, business software can bring in over $ 500k / yr if you're good. I would also leave private banking, wealth management and financial advice here.
  • Consulting - Similar to IB in terms of structure and requirements, but the role of the job is different. Consulting is more about solving problems and giving advice than IB. At the higher end of consulting firms, those at the junior partner level (as long as you stick with all the strenuous trips and hours), will make over $ 500k / year.
  • Accounting - Compensation at the beginning and mid-career at larger companies is much lower than other similar careers on this list, but more experienced partners can get over $ 500k / yr.
  • Entrepreneurship: the sky is the limit here. It could be an individual consulting practice, a restaurant (or restaurant chain), a technology company ... Anything that creates value for clients and where you have significant property can pay well.

Those are accessible careers at least. More talent-based jobs would require you to be in the top 0.01% of talents to have a chance at a career with them that would yield more than the stated figure. Things like professional sports, modeling, art, acting, etc. have a power distribution with those at the top commanding most of the value.

I hope that helps.

Parents, and later their children, have been brainwashed that college is the only answer to financial prosperity; after all, it worked for generations. Today, more than 40 percent of high school graduates are enrolling in college. Only one in four graduates and gets a good job: Department of Labor. There is a supply versus demand problem and a mismatch between acquired skills and demanded skills.

At the same time, community colleges and trades are stigmatized in many ways, both overtly and covertly. Secondary schools have destroyed their professional training.

A selective, multi-level post-se

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Parents, and later their children, have been brainwashed that college is the only answer to financial prosperity; after all, it worked for generations. Today, more than 40 percent of high school graduates are enrolling in college. Only one in four graduates and gets a good job: Department of Labor. There is a supply versus demand problem and a mismatch between acquired skills and demanded skills.

At the same time, community colleges and trades are stigmatized in many ways, both overtly and covertly. Secondary schools have destroyed their professional training.

A selective, multi-tiered postsecondary education system like Germany's would never be accepted in the US One of the basic tenets of our society is egalitarianism. Remember Alexis de Tocqueville said, "Americans are so in love with equality that they would rather be equal in slavery than unequal in freedom."

In the US, parents and students must make better decisions about postsecondary education in the face of the constant "college for all" pace from educators, counselors, politicians, pop culture, special interest groups and , in particular, university administrators. .

There are many good jobs. They are simply not where people look.

I interviewed a woman last month on the subject of on-the-job training. If you complete your training, take all the tests, and earn your certifications, you can become an Ophthalmic Medical Technologist - $ 70K. He has no college debt and is paid to learn.

In my opinion, half of the young people who go to college should go to community college. One of my favorite programs is robotics technician, I find it funny. Invest $ 10K and qualify for a full-time job with benefits of $ 50K. The classes are almost empty. Some of the classes are free government grants.

My local community college has discontinued your plumbing certification, with no interest. My plumber makes $ 100,000.

How about an apprenticeship? Learn to repair elevators and earn $ 78K. There is a cohort of blue-collar Baby Boomers on the brink of retirement.

But instead of acquiring the skills to qualify for a job as a breadwinner, young people are compelled and determined to go to a four-year college. Nobody explains the risks to them.

I could write a book with my collected anecdotes about young people who made a serious mistake while going to college. Here is an example:

The biggest debt burden

Charlie was a good student in a prosperous, suburban high school that sends 65% of its students to college. (At graduation, college goers wear their college hoodies to the stage to earn their diplomas.) Naturally, since his friends were going to college, Charlie wanted to go. He chose the most expensive public school about thirty miles from home. Like most students, it took him five years to get his sheepskin. His major was in English and he was unable to get a suitable job. He decided to go back to school to get another degree in creative writing. He chose an expensive private school ten miles from his home and lived on campus. He obtained a second degree. He currently lives at home. He has two part-time jobs and $ 88K in student loans.

By coincidence, I was doing volunteer work at Charlie's old high school. I shared the data of daunting jobs with the director. His response was, "We certainly don't want students to hear that."

When I talk to these young people, it usually starts out the same way. "I did everything right. I did what I was supposed to do." Some of them "bite the bullet" and go back to school to get an MBA, the new bachelor's degree. But many seem frozen in place. They are distraught and discouraged. The main variable in the conversation is the amount of student loan debt.

Hi, In the main job I had before becoming a freelancer, back in the 1990s, I started with around $ 25,000 / year and finished around $ 40,000 / year just before quitting. At the time, my wife and I lived in a 1,000-square-foot apartment. We carefully tracked our expenses and in a typical month we spent $ 1,700 on everything, total (food, gas, rent, insurance, utilities, everything). Keep this figure in mind for later.

I live in a mid-size city in the US and earn more than $ 300,000 a year from my businesses. In general, it is much, much better than making $ 100,000 per year or less. I will try to give some ideas.

After

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Hi, In the main job I had before becoming a freelancer, back in the 1990s, I started with around $ 25,000 / year and finished around $ 40,000 / year just before quitting. At the time, my wife and I lived in a 1,000-square-foot apartment. We carefully tracked our expenses and in a typical month we spent $ 1,700 on everything, total (food, gas, rent, insurance, utilities, everything). Keep this figure in mind for later.

I live in a mid-size city in the US and earn more than $ 300,000 a year from my businesses. In general, it is much, much better than making $ 100,000 per year or less. I will try to give some ideas.

After we quit our jobs and got some clients, we made about $ 100,000 a year for several years. This seemed like a lot, and we were able to move out of the apartment into a decent house. It still seemed like a great income, although in hindsight we weren't saving as much. In a few years we bought a bigger house and moved in, selling the old one. The mortgage payments on the new house seemed exaggerated and I remember being worried about them. I think they all said it was going to cost around $ 1,500 a month.

During this time, I decided that my goal should be to earn $ 250,000 a year. That sounded like A LOT. I felt that if we could do so much, then we had accomplished it. I promised myself that once we made that much money in a single year, I would buy a fully equipped home theater system that could cost $ 10,000. After all, if you are making $ 250,000, what is $ 10,000?

I have never bought that system yet! :-)

Eventually we acquired another company, and in the mid-2000s we had a good year where our revenue reached $ 270,000. Exciting! But then it dropped back down to $ 114,000 the following year and stayed at $ 100,000 for a few years, as the earnings of the self-employed can go up and down significantly. It even went down to $ 88,000 a year not too long ago.

Since then it has continued to rise, thankfully. $ 137K, $ 233K, $ 378K, $ 430K, and around $ 519,000 for 2015 (that's an estimate). Note that these amounts include business earnings, which are not always withdrawn as personal spending money (distributions). But they are taxed every year!

We do not live an extravagant lifestyle by any means. I drive a very old car, for example. But our cost of living keeps going up and up. Health insurance, mortgage, food, utilities in the largest house, yard maintenance, a new roof, iPhones, Netflix, etc. all add up. Now, do you remember how we lived for $ 1,700 a month in the apartment?

That is less than our mortgage payment now! Our health insurance costs around $ 750 a month! Mad.

Anyway, what is it like to earn more than $ 300,000 a year? The first thing is taxes. When you earn less, you don't think about taxes as much. But once you get into these much higher numbers, the tax payments start to be staggering. We will pay more taxes for 2015 than all of our annual gross income for virtually any year from 1993 to 2006. So, taxes have a huge impact, and you really feel it. I have no problem paying taxes, I am happy to support my country, but yes, it hurts a little to see that so much money is lost. And you have to pay estimated taxes on a quarterly basis and they keep going up and up every year in incredible amounts.

But I will say that there is a lot of cash left. You begin to feel that the amounts that used to seem significant no longer worry you much. When you have $ 400,000 in cash in your bank accounts (not including retirement accounts), then the idea of ​​spending a few hundred or even a few thousand on something seems almost irrelevant. Especially when you know it will bring in another $ 400-500k (gross) in the current year. I mean, what is the difference between $ 400,000 and $ 395,000? They start to look like the same number, more or less.

However, at the same time, I am still a very frugal person. It is not necessarily easy to spend those hundreds that I mentioned. I will not buy expensive cars, watches, clothes, toys, or vacations. I would like to take a vacation in Europe and I would have no mental problem with spending $ 5,000 on that, but I don't want to waste money or spend it frivolously.

So I think he largely retains whatever his old attitude towards money was. Living cheaply in our old apartment, we developed a rather frugal attitude. So now we have money, but that attitude remains.

The funny thing is, now that our income is so much higher and we have money in the bank, I really want more! I want to make $ 600k or $ 700k or a million in a single year. They say that people always think they will be happy when they have / earn about twice what they currently do. I guess it applies. When we hit $ 27,000 that year, I probably thought $ 500,000 would be enough. Now that we've done it, I feel like a million would be enough. And so it goes.

With this level of income, we cannot buy things like Lamborghinis. I mean ... we could, we have the cash on hand to buy one easily. But it would be incredibly stupid to waste our money like that.

Instead, we'd really like to fully fund our retirement and, in a way, take a leap forward in that regard by setting aside maybe $ 200,000 just for that purpose. A few years ago we thought we would need to save $ 30,000 a year to comfortably reach retirement, so starting with a large amount would be wonderful.

Currently I have spent a lot of time looking for how to invest our free cash and / or create or buy another business. I hope to find something quite passive but that allows us to turn our savings of $ 400,000 into a lot more. Some of the things I have looked at include buying rental real estate, selling on Amazon, reinvesting more in one of my companies, and the good stock market. It's a bit of a pain to have all that cash in hand, earning only about 0.95% interest each year (yay for Discover Bank!).

I'm a bit lazy ... sometimes I want to start another company and really get things going and sell it for millions or billions in a few years (you know ... like WhatsApp :-)) ... other times just I want to laze around and watch movies on our old big-screen TV (you know, the rear-projection kind). That's right, we haven't upgraded since we bought that one in 2001 with a bonus money a client gave me for working over the weekend.

Oh, and it seems like the old saying about having multiple sources of income is true. We have the two companies with wages and earnings, some other write-in earnings, income from a rental we own, and a little interest here and there.

There is a clear sense of security and a bit of a sense of having "accomplished." But just a little. I still look at all those who have sold their companies for large amounts, or the guys who make millions annually on Wall Street, and I envy their money and their success. So I guess no matter how much you have, there is always someone with more.

The IRS defines three broad types of income: passive income, active income, and portfolio income. How are you trying to earn your $ 300 a day?

Both passive and portfolio income are often available to those who have money to invest and / or an extremely unique and marketable skill. If you are in this category, congratulations! If not, keep reading.

Your active income (aka your business, job, career, main source of money that you actively work for) is probably ready for an income boost! Do you want to earn $ 300 a day? I'll assume you mean 7 days a week. Let's see, $ 300 times 365 days a year is $

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The IRS defines three broad types of income: passive income, active income, and portfolio income. How are you trying to earn your $ 300 a day?

Both passive and portfolio income are often available to those who have money to invest and / or an extremely unique and marketable skill. If you are in this category, congratulations! If not, keep reading.

Your active income (aka your business, job, career, main source of money that you actively work for) is probably ready for an income boost! Do you want to earn $ 300 a day? I'll assume you mean 7 days a week. Let's see, $ 300 times 365 days a year is $ 109,500 a year. That's a completely achievable number in almost any career or business, if you're in the top 2-5% of your field. Obviously, if you are a doctor or are in some other "well paid" field, you can earn much more. But the interesting thing here is that even jobs that we would consider "low paying" can actually pay a lot if we are the best at what we do.

Example: working in retail. You can't make money here, right? Only for people without education. Incorrect. District managers earn $ 80k-90k a year. Regional managers earn $ 125k more. I have a good friend named Mike who is 35 years old and has no degree. He is extremely good at retail and is now a regional manager.

Example two: window washing. You can't really make money here. Unless you start a window washing business and provide amazing service. Word spreads about how good you are and you start landing bigger contracts. Then you grow your business until you can afford a house in Hawaii. Like my neighbor Greg.

As crazy as it sounds, if you like what you do for a living these days. Just focus on how to be the best at it. You can start the business on your own once you've mastered it, or they'll promote you enough to earn more than you can imagine.

If you don't like what you are doing now, find something that you are passionate about and like. Go after him and focus on becoming the best at it. Be the person who earns all the money in your field. So $ 300 a day is easy. Heck, $ 600 will be easy.

I'm going to take advantage of what Bill said about the trades, I'm just going to focus on an electrician because that's what I am. They pay me to go to school 5 weeks a year. When I finish, I will have a license and some college credits in case I want to become an engineer.

My first year doing this in Montana, I made about 55k, and I was only 19 years old. Three years later and I only won around 70k. Now I'm stuck in Montana because I don't have a license yet. My friends who can travel earn six figures and take months off every year.

Is this job easy? Much. I think a lot of people are shy

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I'm going to take advantage of what Bill said about the trades, I'm just going to focus on an electrician because that's what I am. They pay me to go to school 5 weeks a year. When I finish, I will have a license and some college credits in case I want to become an engineer.

My first year doing this in Montana, I made about 55k, and I was only 19 years old. Three years later and I only won around 70k. Now I'm stuck in Montana because I don't have a license yet. My friends who can travel earn six figures and take months off every year.

Is this job easy? Much. I think a lot of people avoid it for an obvious reason. Who has the most influence on someone who decides his future career? Other than parents, it is probably someone in the school system like a teacher or a counselor. They all went to college, so guess what they are going to put pressure on the others?

You hear a lot about people who come out of college with a degree that they can't do anything with. The day you hear that about an electrical license will also be the day you hear about swine aviation. In fact, Ideal Industries says we will have a shortage of 60,000 electricians within 7 years. The shortage of electricians creates potential for six-figure jobs. I think it could be more. All this technology that has been growing exponentially does not require philosophy to work; requires electricity.

Side note: If you are in Montana and want to be an electrician, contact my friend Austin Rodgers and he will help you. 406–694–2226

It depends on how easy is defined. Some jobs are easy to come by, but require difficult or unpleasant work. Others are hard to come by, but provide a relatively cool environment.

Being a college intern at a high-tech company is generally a fairly easy job (40 hours, less responsibility than full-time employees, free accommodation, inside work, generous benefits) and typically pays a little over $ 100,000 prorated. The problem is, it's pretty hard to get the job in the first place, and you probably had to work pretty hard in school to be considered. Even easier is to be a "lounging and acquiring" tech clerk with no real job like

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It depends on how easy is defined. Some jobs are easy to come by, but require difficult or unpleasant work. Others are hard to come by, but provide a relatively cool environment.

Being a college intern at a high-tech company is generally a fairly easy job (40 hours, less responsibility than full-time employees, free accommodation, inside work, generous benefits) and typically pays a little over $ 100,000 prorated. The problem is, it's pretty hard to get the job in the first place, and you probably had to work pretty hard in school to be considered. Even easier is being a "chill-out" tech employee with no actual job assignments, only paid for some kind of contractual or intellectual property reason.

Even easier may be being a semi-retired owner of an established business. Of course, starting a business is very difficult, but if you can get your top employees to do most of the actual work of running the business, you could be working well under 40 hours a week. Obviously getting to this point is incredibly difficult.

As for a job that is not very hard to get and that pays $ 100,000, in high school, I had a friend who worked laying out roads for a couple of summers. He worked 70 demanding and dangerous hours a week and had to spend many nights in boring little towns. But he was making over $ 2000 a week as a teenager with no college education or certificates, so he really didn't have to work very hard to get hired.

They paid me 6 figures in various areas of international trade and transportation. I was one of the few, perhaps the only, person who actually worked in every industry associated with transportation and international trade, which made me very useful.

I didn't have a college degree, but keep in mind I graduated from a gifted program at a private high school, served as vice president in every position I've held since I was 25, co-author of a reference book, was appointed as an Advisory Director substitute of the existing UN who was over 80 years old and had several professional licenses, one in which he was

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They paid me 6 figures in various areas of international trade and transportation. I was one of the few, perhaps the only, person who actually worked in every industry associated with transportation and international trade, which made me very useful.

I didn't have a college degree, but keep in mind I graduated from a gifted program at a private high school, served as vice president in every position I've held since I was 25 years old, co-author of a reference book, was appointed Advisory Director substitute for the existing UN who was over 80 years old and had several professional licenses, one in which I was the second youngest to have it at 21 years old. Not only did I get a good 6-figure salary, but I usually got a piece of the earnings. . For the last 23 years it was 25% of net earnings in addition to my six-figure salary.

Note that you must be very good at what you do. They waived the college degree requirement in part because of my IQ, which one company tested and others simply accepted my Mensa membership as proof. The other part was my list of accomplishments, as well as being well known in the industry.

There are many jobs that pay six figures. Here's a good list of a few: 10 High-Paying Jobs You Can Get Without a College Degree

  1. Live in an MSA 1 with more than 500,000 people.
  2. Choose a skill that will be in demand for the foreseeable future (ie computer science, mechanical engineering, or accounting).
  3. Get credentials that allow you to get an entry-level job in one of the fields above.
  4. Build your expertise, take on projects others don't want, get to know the company, and act as an owner in resolving cross-team issues.
  5. Document a commendable portfolio.
  6. Find and meet the best people in your field in your city. Ask these people great questions about the field.
  7. If an opportunity at another reputable firm would give you noticeably more
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Footnotes

1 List of metropolitan statistical areas - Wikipedia
  1. Live in an MSA 1 with more than 500,000 people.
  2. Choose a skill that will be in demand for the foreseeable future (ie computer science, mechanical engineering, or accounting).
  3. Get credentials that allow you to get an entry-level job in one of the fields above.
  4. Build your expertise, take on projects others don't want, get to know the company, and act as an owner in resolving cross-team issues.
  5. Document a commendable portfolio.
  6. Find and meet the best people in your field in your city. Ask these people great questions about the field.
  7. If an opportunity at another reputable company would give you noticeably more responsibility than is possible at your current company, then jump!
  8. Repeat, and it will probably hit 100k / yr within a decade or two, depending on the field.

While there are no guarantees, this appears to be the most reliable six-figure route for most people.

Footnotes

1 List of metropolitan statistical areas - Wikipedia

Umm ... It sounded like first world mentality ... Easy money, little effort.

While the people of my country are totally opposite. Our ideology is the other way around ... Count on me, any job that pays.

The work at Crocodile Farm in Thailand is unthinkable. Although the pay is peanut, there used to be a long waiting list for healthy young Thais whose aspiration is "No mountain too high to cross, no mouth too big for the head."

“Samutprakan Zoo was hell on Earth for the animals, but thanks to PETA, WFFT, and online pressure from concerned people around the world, their prolonged suffering

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Umm ... It sounded like first world mentality ... Easy money, little effort.

While the people of my country are totally opposite. Our ideology is the other way around ... Count on me, any job that pays.

The work at Crocodile Farm in Thailand is unthinkable. Although the pay is peanut, there used to be a long waiting list for healthy young Thais whose aspiration is "No mountain too high to cross, no mouth too big for the head."

"The Samutprakan Zoo was hell on Earth for the animals, but thanks to PETA, WFFT, and pressure online from concerned people around the world, their prolonged suffering will finally come to an end," said PETA Senior Vice President Jason Baker./Coconuts Bangkok

“To his horror, a second after the handler put his head into the crocodile's mouth, the crocodile closed its jaws and a brief struggle took place until the handler was able to free himself ... The owners of the crocodile farm say that this was the first time such an incident has occurred on this farm ”/ - Richard Barrow - Surely it will not be the last.

The true hero of the zoo has been hailed as an outstanding artist with a proud record, just 300 points after 20 years, while his former apprentice is a rising star who hits him with just 100 points to the head. There are 12 daring stunts that make Hollywood stunts look like a hobbyist.

"That job pays a lot, but it's still worth every penny," is my answer.

The catch here is that while you don't need a title, you need to be more informative and more experienced in solving problems and getting over things done.

  • Software engineer
  • Web developer
  • Some youtuber earn over $ 300k
  • Working in extreme environments or high-hazard jobs, so you risk rewarding, but the risk here is death.

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