What are some industries or jobs that will be created recently in the next few decades that most people don't realize will exist?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Evie Young



What are some industries or jobs that will be created recently in the next few decades that most people don't realize will exist?

  1. Sex robot gynecologist
  2. Bulletproof clothing designer
  3. Robot Click Farm Manager
  4. Robot wedding officiant
  5. High school cafeteria budtender
  6. Mechanical Flying Laz-E-Boy Big Gulp Cup Holder
  7. Hemp Diaper Changing Table for Amazon Slave Workers
  8. CBD soy shake vendor
  9. Sale of weapons outside psychiatric institutions for newly discharged patients
  10. XXXXXXXXL laundry machine, with additional pockets for dipping sauce
  1. BEV to Flux Capacitor Conversion Garages
  2. Clone detectives (locate and destroy)
  3. Drone Scarecrow Makers
  4. Hyper Loop Recovery Companies
  5. Autonomous Post-mortem Vehicle Accident Investigators
  6. IA Ethical Choice Judges
  7. Manufacture of devices for increasing the plant status
  8. Connect "IQ +" USB augmentation products
  9. Holographic Care Worker
  10. 24-hour door-to-door service to grow a new organ

1. transgender nude tv news

2. wood-fired electric vehicles

3. Connecticut concentration camps for white elders

4. two-year colleges for pets

5. Delivery of pizza by beam of light from a flying saucer

6. National sports full-body contact tissue

7.docs in lawn mowing, making soups, and going to exchange meetings

As much as I like the list Robert Stone provided, I had a few others that he missed.

  1. Mood Manager: reprogram the built-in brain electrodes
  2. Mentalist: Tech Support for Brain Machine Interfaces
  3. Drugoptimist: adapt a gene therapy to your genetic blueprint
  4. Family geneticist: plan your baby and give him the right gene set
  5. AI Shrink: Rescue, repair and reprogram the AI ​​that went wrong

I had a successful career advising companies and the government on how to invest to improve performance or to make a profit. He had an investment blog (Economics of the XXI century) based on the premise "if you know that an event is going to take place, you can benefit from it." It no longer charges a subscription fee, but you can see it at If you know an event is taking place, you can benefit from it!

No, I am not a gifted prophet nor can I see the future. I just look at trends, especially megatrends, like the movement of the 74 million baby boomers as they go through their ages and change the trend.

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I had a successful career advising companies and the government on how to invest to improve performance or to make a profit. He had an investment blog (Economics of the XXI century) based on the premise "if you know that an event is going to take place, you can benefit from it." It no longer charges a subscription fee, but you can see it at If you know an event is taking place, you can benefit from it!

No, I am not a gifted prophet nor can I see the future. I just look at trends, especially megatrends, like the movement of the 74 million baby boomers as they age and demographics change.

In reality, it is not possible to predict what will happen in the future. That's like asking them to describe what you don't know. Who in the 1950s could have predicted the use of personal computers in the 1990s? The same goes for virtual reality, flat screen TVs, etc. If you think about it carefully, it is possible to guess that some industries will evolve, grow, disappear or be replaced, but it is much easier to see what will NOT exist in 50 years. This is possible simply by projecting trends, technology, and society as they evolve today and seeing the obvious conclusions from those trends. For example, it is obvious that autonomous cars will be commonplace in 50 years and that coal-based electricity generation will be significantly reduced or will disappear altogether.

I could spend a lot of time thinking about potential jobs, but it would be better to show you how to do it yourself based on some simple and unavoidable trends that we can see happening now.

Technology: Computers are still evolving and we are still exploring how they can be used. Due to the profit motive, you can be sure that ANYTHING that can be automated will be. This is evident now with things like interactive digital voice telephony operators and voice menus. This trend will grow to include all jobs and functions that can be defined by a strict set of rules, formulas, logic, or repetitive actions. Things like accounting, banking, investing, and the use of cash will almost certainly disappear in 50 years. But other jobs that follow definable rules and logic will also disappear, like most doctors. A data entry clerk with minimal medical experience will take basic measurements and tests and then the computer will look for what is wrong with you and describe what is or will be needed, including surgery. Most of the transport (cars, planes, trains, boats) will be automated. For safety and image reasons, there may be one person in the "driver" seat, but that person won't do much unless something breaks and the redundancy and safety backups within the systems are extremely reliable. Almost all manufacturing will be fully automated by robotics. Teaching is likely to be automated through prerecorded video lessons. Only one classroom monitor will be needed, if there are still classrooms in use. Almost all manufacturing will be fully automated by robotics. Teaching is likely to be automated through prerecorded video lessons. Only one classroom monitor will be needed, if there are still classrooms in use. Almost all manufacturing will be fully automated by robotics. Teaching is likely to be automated through prerecorded video lessons. Only one classroom monitor will be needed, if there are still classrooms in use.

Robotics will do most of the manual work and fabrication. Operating 24x7x365 without interruptions except for maintenance, this will allow costs to be lower, custom manufacturing will take place anywhere. Enhanced versions of digital 3D printing on fabric, metal, and ceramic, as well as plastics, will mean that even single production will be inexpensive.

What this implies is that there will be a great growth in the demand for programmers, robotics, data entry and system designers with an emphasis on interdisciplinary training: experts in computer science and mechanics or in human-digital interfaces or digital visual systems, etc. manufacturing, sales and distribution will be automated, jobs will be on the design and innovation aspects of production.

Society and Government: The experience of recent years in globalization, world trade and the inter-trustworthiness of countries with each other will increase in the future, expand to more countries and in greater depth, mainly driven by trade and profit . Communications and transportation will improve and be more efficient to the point where it will be rare to have a large inventory of any product waiting to be sold. Instead, we will move more to JIT (Just In Time) manufacturing. This means that you will not go buy your shirt size from a store, they will scan you and make a custom shirt for you. The same goes for cars, shoes, curtains, rugs, jewelry, food, etc. etc. Distributed manufacturing will mean that instead of being made in China and sold in the US, a product can be ordered from a company in China where it is designed and specified; The data is then sent to a local manufacturing plant that will digitally print it, knit or mold it, or manufacture it to those specifications. This can happen in as little as a day or two.

There will also be a larger population, so food production will be a big industry, but they are likely to be advanced versions of hydroponics, ocean farming, and edible chemistry. The entertainment industry will also be a big problem with 3-D, 360-degree virtual reality, 3D television, and dozens of others we haven't even dreamed of yet.

You get the idea. Now imagine what it will take to create and support this kind of environment. That's where the jobs will be. Wish I could live to see it.

IMO

In the future, what is the guarantee of the existence of Humanity?

In the same way, which manual jobs would become automated remains a talk of the town. Every day / week, there is a new technology that results in the dismissal of few employees in the world.

In fact, as previously predicted, more than 2 billion jobs will disappear by 2030. Again, this is not a pessimistic prediction, but rather a wake-up call to the world.

It can range from high-paying jobs to low-level jobs.

I am trying to highlight some of them:

  1. Transportation: driverless

Drivers

Taxi / limousine / bus / truck / postman / car rental staff

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In the future, what is the guarantee of the existence of Humanity?

In the same way, which manual jobs would become automated remains a talk of the town. Every day / week, there is a new technology that results in the dismissal of few employees in the world.

In fact, as previously predicted, more than 2 billion jobs will disappear by 2030. Again, this is not a pessimistic prediction, but rather a wake-up call to the world.

It can range from high-paying jobs to low-level jobs.

I am trying to highlight some of them:

  1. Transportation: driverless

Drivers

Taxi / limousine / bus / truck / postman / car rental staff driver

Public security

Traffic police / Meter clerks / Traffic court judges / Traffic court lawyers / Traffic court DA / Traffic court support staff

Misc.

Parking attendants / Valet assistants / Car wash workers

2. Education

Teaching requires experts. Learning only requires trainers.

With all assets in place, we are rapidly moving toward the new frontier of a teacherless education system.

Jobs that are going to disappear

Teachers / Trainers / Teachers

3. Bots

Jobs that go away

Fishing bots will replace fishermen.

Mining bots will replace miners.

Agricultural bots will replace farmers.

Inspection robots will replace human inspectors.

The warrior drones will replace the soldiers.

Robots can collect building material that comes out of the 3D printer and start building a house out of it.

4. Massive energy storage

Jobs that go away

Energy planners

Environmental designers

Energy auditors

Power plant operators

Miners

Oil well drillers, thugs

Geologists

Meter Readers

Gas / propane delivery

5. Robots

Jobs in Danger
Medical / Maintenance / Retail

There is no need to emphasize, new jobs will be created due to the new jobs mentioned above.

We can have this as another answer.

Footnote:
Images: Google
http://www.futuristspeaker.com/business-trends/2-billion-jobs-to-disappear-by-2030/
162 Future Jobs: Prep for Jobs That Don't Exist Yet

Meter maid. Parking control is ready for automation through public security cameras.

Telephone salesperson. Half of the marketing calls I get are already just timed recordings.

Print operator, plate maker, and darkroom technician. As software and hardware get more and more sophisticated, more and more of the printing process will depend on the graphic designer to set things up correctly. Less and less jobs will separate the designer from the final product. When I started doing graphic design, I used to have to shoot huge negatives of artworks, develop them, disassemble them into stands, burn plates, scru

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Meter maid. Parking control is ready for automation through public security cameras.

Telephone salesperson. Half of the marketing calls I get are already just timed recordings.

Print operator, plate maker, and darkroom technician. As software and hardware get more and more sophisticated, more and more of the printing process will depend on the graphic designer to set things up correctly. Less and less jobs will separate the designer from the final product. When I started doing graphic design, I used to have to shoot huge negatives of works of art, develop them, peel them onto supports, burn plates, scrub those plates, and hand them over to the journalist who would install them at the print shop and execute the job. These jobs are increasingly rare and will disappear completely in 50 years.

Icebreaker ship captain. Well, 50 years may be a bit optimistic (pessimistic?) But, if we no longer have sea ice, we no longer need icebreakers.

Fast food cashier. Earlier this week, I placed a full order at Taco Bell, hit the button that said I was on my way to pick up food, and they delivered my bag of food to self-service. No teller was involved. Making food is actually still cheaper by hand than by machine, but a fast food cashier these days is basically a glorified push button. People will want to push their own buttons more and more. Ordering kiosks are already popping up in select restaurants.

The idea that there is a paid job waiting for everyone is going away.

It was a somewhat strange idea in the first place. Before jobs were invented, people worked primarily to house and feed their families. Amazingly, they did it by building the house and growing the food. Today, that is close to being illegal, as it would likely violate building codes and zoning laws if you tried to do so in a western country. Meanwhile, what happened was that a very complicated system was invented, in which you go out and work for other people, then buy what you need.

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The idea that there is a paid job waiting for everyone is going away.

It was a somewhat strange idea in the first place. Before jobs were invented, people worked primarily to house and feed their families. Amazingly, they did it by building the house and growing the food. Today, that is close to being illegal, as it would likely violate building codes and zoning laws if you tried to do so in a western country. In the meantime, what happened was that a very complicated system was invented, where you go out and work for other people, then buy what you need from others, before you can go home and enjoy it.

One of the problems with the scheme is that there is no very good regulatory mechanism for employment. There is one for money, albeit flawed. If there is not enough money to pay for things, central banks are tasked with putting more money into circulation. If there is too much money out there, it is your job to get rid of it, thus keeping the money supply fairly stable, which roughly corresponds to what you have to pay. Again, there are a lot of problems with this, but at least there is a system to keep it stable.

There is no system that automatically creates more jobs when there are people who need them, or that withdraws some jobs if there is no one to fill them. Governments try to do it, but unless they are centralized socialist governments, they have no direct ways of doing it. A direct way would be to hire more people if there are people out of work. What they do is indirect things, in the form of "stimulating" the economy in various ways. Sometimes they do this in ideological ways that may not even work, or may do the opposite. For example, there is the philosophy of the supply side that is popular with neocons in the United States. The idea is that if you give rich people more money, they will be smart enough to do things with it that create more business and, therefore, more jobs. Then again they could just invest it in other ways or buy gold plated pools. Or they could buy robotic factories, without creating many jobs. The supply side is seen in contrast to the demand side economy, which would stimulate the economy by giving ordinary people more money, inspiring them to go and spend it, making the wheels turn. There is also no guarantee that this will create more jobs, as the things that people are buying could still be produced in robotic factories and in another country. The supply side is seen in contrast to the demand side economy, which would stimulate the economy by giving ordinary people more money, inspiring them to go and spend it, making the wheels turn. There is also no guarantee that this will create more jobs, as the things that people are buying could still be produced in robotic factories and in another country. The supply side is seen in contrast to the demand side economy, which would stimulate the economy by giving ordinary people more money, inspiring them to go and spend it, making the wheels turn. There is also no guarantee that this will create more jobs, as the things that people are buying could still be produced in robotic factories and in another country.

More things are being produced with less and less effort. Production is being automated. Less and less people can create more and more. This increased efficiency could potentially do a lot of good things, but what it certainly doesn't do is produce more jobs. Naturally, it produces fewer jobs. And owners of production machinery largely retain the benefits of increased efficiency. Yes, people get cheaper stuff too, but they don't get the jobs that would pay them, so they can afford to buy it.

This system will break sooner or later, but that's a different discussion.

Meanwhile, jobs are increasingly being replaced by being alone in business. You will have noticed, even if you have a job, that you have had to compete to get it, promote yourself, locate potential employers, pack well, etc. There are very few jobs waiting for you. Jobs are not safe either, even if you have them. It is highly unlikely that it will last a lifetime, so you will have to do it over and over again. Therefore, more people will move on to the next step, to be autonomous and learn how to market their services, find clients, etc. Since you are becoming self-employed anyway, you are also more likely to choose a line of activity that really interests you, more than a regular job would.

Another intriguing trend is likely to close the loop and lead us back to a more sustainable and local way of life. As technology advances, it is possible to make more things yourself. Think 3D printers and open source hardware and software. As the global economic system becomes more uncertain and unstable, we perceive a greater need to address our needs at the local level. The right combination of technologies will make it more and more possible.

So, one way or another, it is very likely that we will go back to where we started, but at a much higher level. That is to say, that you work on what you really need and what you want to work on. You will need to financially connect with other people, but there doesn't need to be any work involved.

It would be a good idea to start right now to get used to the idea. Leave work thinking. Think about having skills that will be necessary and useful, whether there is a job for it or not. Think about understanding who needs your services and how you can reach them. Consider organizing your life so you can eat and have a place to live, even if business is slow.

Online shopping advisor

Buying things online is only increasing, while local stores are closing (unfortunately). People go to a shoe store to find out what size, then they buy it online and have it shipped home.

Image: Top Ten Lists or Best Top 10 Lists at TopTenpk.com

Soon there will be ... physical stores where you pay to advise and test products, and then buy them online.

A new job will be to become an expert in various trades, help you find the right product (for a small fee), and then provide you with options of where to buy it online. Typically a small store with a limited selection of samples to try. Possible

Keep reading

Online shopping advisor

Buying things online is only increasing, while local stores are closing (unfortunately). People go to a shoe store to find out what size, then they buy it online and have it shipped home.

Image: Top Ten Lists or Best Top 10 Lists at TopTenpk.com

Soon there will be ... physical stores where you pay to advise and test products, and then buy them online.

A new job will be to become an expert in various trades, help you find the right product (for a small fee), and then provide you with options of where to buy it online. Typically a small store with a limited selection of samples to try. Possibly, certain companies will pay the store to promote their online store, or their products, either through a flat fee or commission (beware!) To the online shopping advisor.

But the main idea is this: you pay the online shopping consultant to find the right product, at the right price. The merchant / owner has expenses too, your entry fee and commission will pay for those bills.

It could work like this: you pay to enter the store and you can try all the products you like, be it shoes, clothing, gadgets or whatever the store specializes in. You may be waived the entrance fee if you buy something, through the affiliates of the physical stores. Yes, the store will have browsers available so that you can purchase any item on the spot.

What is that job called, I don't know, maybe "online shopping consultant"? In any case, it seems pretty certain to me that this work will come soon.

'Name a strong and trustworthy man, on whom you can unload your heavy load; a person who will guide you through a crowd of confusion; make sure you are comfortable in a niche intended for you; but he is strict with his transactions, and no; We are not talking about your dad.

The quintessential Indian festival would begin and end with this strong and muscular man, dressed in red; cool and serene, with boxes stacked over his head like a strong Wi-Fi signal. He would guide us and drive us home to our berth, without the need for a GPS signal. After the holidays, we as children would try to replicate his act with wa

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'Name a strong and trustworthy man, on whom you can unload your heavy load; a person who will guide you through a crowd of confusion; make sure you are comfortable in a niche intended for you; but he is strict with his transactions, and no; We are not talking about your dad.

The quintessential Indian festival would begin and end with this strong and muscular man, dressed in red; cool and serene, with boxes stacked over his head like a strong Wi-Fi signal. He would guide us and drive us home to our berth, without the need for a GPS signal. After the holidays, when we were children, we would try to replicate his act by walking with stacks of cardboard boxes on our heads; ending with invariable cerebrovascular accidents.

He's the doorman, the cool 'coolie'.

When I was a school boy, I never thought of him as an unskilled manual worker, but as a strong and trustworthy man, with whom even my perfectionist father would leave his luggage in complete confidence. The porter would eventually share his up-to-date knowledge of the platform, the number of cars, and the seating locations; an essential link for train travel. No need to press 1 for English.

Robert Plath, a pilot for an airline in the northwestern United States, fiddled with some tools in his garage, attached an aluminum telescopic handle to the top of his travel case and a pair of spinning roller skates on the bottom; creating a free wheel luggage. Suddenly, the need for a strong, muscular shoulder in a red shirt was lost. In one fell swoop he created a niche of a billion dollar trolley-bag business and practically eliminated the clan of porters.

As a child, I remember traveling on the Coromandel Express from Calcutta to Chennai; once we got on the train, in my excitement, I ran and took the coveted window seat, and opened the steel blind. The porter who was still fixing the luggage came up to me and said 'baba, always make sure the blind is closed after opening, otherwise it could fall and crush your hand, while the train is moving; never forget'.

I never forgot; not his instruction, but that all-knowing, muscular, mustachioed man in red.

At fifty, I can walk around with a fancy rolling suitcase, but maybe a decade or two later I'd go for something more than cool; it can be cool, that is; if they are not extinct by then '

(Reference - from my article in Hindi)

Much more mundane: In the United States, Western Europe, and Japan, we are facing a huge increase in older people over the next decade. And in terms of percentages, the number of very old people (over 80) will increase even faster. A prediction I saw said that we will have more than 600,000 people over the age of 100 in the United States by 2030.

Many existing jobs will be in high demand: geriatric medicine, home health aides, personal shoppers, hospice care, etc. There will be a great demand for workers in these areas.

A mental exercise would be to imagine what other roles, new jobs,

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Much more mundane: In the United States, Western Europe, and Japan, we are facing a huge increase in older people over the next decade. And in terms of percentages, the number of very old people (over 80) will increase even faster. A prediction I saw said that we will have more than 600,000 people over the age of 100 in the United States by 2030.

Many existing jobs will be in high demand: geriatric medicine, home health aides, personal shoppers, hospice care, etc. There will be a great demand for workers in these areas.

A mental exercise would be to imagine what other roles, new jobs, could be associated with this trend. For example, this will be the first generation of seniors to have access to computers, email, and social media.

If you were looking for a new career, you would ask what someone who is old but rich needs. And no, I am not a 22 year old blonde!

Shopping center developers. Corona has emptied a retail segment that is already reeling with an increase in home delivery; young people like to live in cities until they have children, and couples do not have as many or are doing it later; There seems to be a generational shift from buying "things" to buying experiences; and the cost of square footage to a business owner is meaningless when starting out, compared to simply investing in an online presence. All of this combines to make the "retail therapy and wandering" model less attractive.

I still think that you will see shopping malls forever, reused in

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Shopping center developers. Corona has emptied a retail segment that is already reeling with an increase in home delivery; young people like to live in cities until they have children, and couples do not have as many or are doing it later; There seems to be a generational shift from buying "things" to buying experiences; and the cost of square footage to a business owner is meaningless when starting out, compared to simply investing in an online presence. All of this combines to make the "retail therapy and wandering" model less attractive.

I still think that you will see shopping malls forever, repurposed in medical centers, universities, high-density housing or smaller and ephemeral pop-up stores. I just don't see any expansion of the market, just a contraction.

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