What are some important things not to do or say in an interview?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Ameer Sellers



What are some important things not to do or say in an interview?

Be friendly, but remember that the interviewer is not your friend - serious business is going on here. Even if you like casual clothing, dress modestly for the interview. It doesn't hurt for a coal miner to wear a tie in an interview! Wearing the tie says, “This guy isn't too proud to submit to a social convention; that means he's more likely to be a cooperative person than the guy who turned up looking like James Dean. "

Your resume is a fact sheet about you and it makes you brag about it (if you've carefully included the things the company would like to know that you do well). No

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Be friendly, but remember that the interviewer is not your friend - serious business is going on here. Even if you like casual clothing, dress modestly for the interview. It doesn't hurt for a coal miner to wear a tie in an interview! Wearing the tie says, “This guy isn't too proud to submit to a social convention; that means he's more likely to be a cooperative person than the guy who turned up looking like James Dean. "

Your resume is an information sheet about you and it makes you brag about it (if you've carefully included the things the company would like to know that you do well). Do not exaggerate or show off your skills on the court, unless it is essential for them to know that you have a certain talent.

DO NOT MUMIS. Did I say "don't murmur?" Well? Do not do it.

Let your "yes" mean "yes" and your "no" mean "no." Anything more than that comes from the devil himself. Be direct and honest. Companies know that one dishonest worker will deny the work of three honest ones; If your talk drifts from here to there to nowhere, they won't want you.

  1. Forgetting to ask questions: Asking questions illustrates your enthusiasm and interest in the position and simply shows that you have been paying attention. If an applicant has no questions, it simply shows that they do not fully understand what the company does. Any job applicant should have at least 3-4 questions that they would like to ask the interviewer.
  2. Forget about bringing copies of your resume, you should always remember to bring copies of your resume no matter how many times you have sent it and to whom.
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  1. Forgetting to ask questions: Asking questions illustrates your enthusiasm and interest in the position and simply shows that you have been paying attention. If an applicant has no questions, it simply shows that they do not fully understand what the company does. Any job applicant should have at least 3-4 questions that they would like to ask the interviewer.
  2. Forgetting to bring copies of your resume - You should always remember to bring copies of your resume no matter how many times you have sent it and to whom, as you are likely meeting new people who never knew you or even left. through your resume. Don't give the interviewer a hard time checking email apps only to filter your resume again.
  3. Not having a clue about the business - Knowing the basics of a business is as simple as updating your Facebook account. Most of the hiring managers I have managed to interact with generally find great discouragement when prospective employees are sadly prepared when asked what they will contribute to the company. This sometimes causes some lenient managers to guide them through a verbal tour of the organization because they have not reviewed the organization's mission statement. This isn't just annoying, it's silly.
  4. Talking About Money Too Early - This is an immediate detour if a candidate raises the subject of money too early in the discussion. This is because most of the time, if a candidate shows that they are much more interested in what they will earn rather than whether they would be a good fit for the position, they are most likely not interested in learning and moving the organization forward. He is not someone that many recruiters would like to hire.
  5. Arriving too late or too early - You should always remember that being late is not always an option. You need to get there about ten minutes early to understand the terrain and get your documents in order. On the other hand, arriving too early, say thirty minutes ahead of time, only shows that you have too much free time. Therefore, you should not diminish your appeal by appearing desperate.

Don't appear like you've gotten out of bed. It's okay to have a beard ... but it should be neat and clean. Your lock should be combed down. In other jobs ... it seems you can fix yourself. Your clothes should not be wrinkled. They should not be used (discolored, frayed, stained, etc.). In my field ... DO NOT SHOW IN A T-SHIRT AND JEANS. Yes, that's the dress code for some companies ... dress up a bit, show some effort.

Do not curse.

Don't keep talking about how bad your company is. You can tell why you are leaving tactfully. If you can't, come up with a standard answer that is acceptable "I"

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Don't appear like you've gotten out of bed. It's okay to have a beard ... but it should be neat and clean. Your lock should be combed down. In other jobs ... it seems you can fix yourself. Your clothes should not be wrinkled. They should not be used (discolored, frayed, stained, etc.). In my field ... DO NOT SHOW IN A T-SHIRT AND JEANS. Yes, that's the dress code for some companies ... dress up a bit, show some effort.

Do not curse.

Don't keep talking about how bad your company is. You can tell why you are leaving tactfully. If you cannot, come up with a standard answer that is acceptable "I am looking for a position that will challenge me more and expand my skills as a technician" "I am involved in a couple of tasks in my current position and I am looking to expand my experience and skills" ... something other than "my new boss is an idiot" or "they don't pay me enough."

Everyone has flaws ... DO NOT try to use a false flaw to answer the question "I'm a bit of a perfectionist", "I'm too detail-oriented" or other similar verbiage. Hiring managers know that you are trying to turn the positive into the negative ... What if "I can be direct to the point that people find it unpleasant" or "I am more direct than some people are comfortable with. "or" I do my best to remain professional in front of clients ... but there are times when I can vent to my teammates ... I don't do this in front of clients, but it's not professional. ”Those they are real flaws. Show that I am aware of them. Can give examples "I am known for being comfortable and being very frank ... I once told a teammate that he was wrong, in many words. I try to be less direct and rephrase it as "I'm not sure it's entirely accurate ... let's talk about it after the meeting and make sure we've considered it thoroughly before acting on it." It shows that you are not just aware of the fault, but is trying to improve it. They are honest answers (I told an interviewer that when I am frustrated I have my mouth on me. I get sarcastic and curse ... I do not do it within earshot of the client, but sometimes the frustration comes out in my tone of voice ... I try not to do it, but I'm not always successful. ”In fact, he said that we are integrated with the client, but he understands it ... I don't do it when the client hears it, but sometimes frustration is reflected in my tone of voice. I try not to, but I am not always successful ”. In fact, he said that we are integrated with the client, but he understands ... I don't do it when the client hears it, but sometimes the frustration is reflected in my tone of voice. I try not to, but I am not always successful ”. In fact, he said that we are integrated with the customer, but he understands ...

Don't try to talk to your interviewer. Acknowledge your own knowledge. "I don't know SQL. I configured the server, but never did any DBA work ”. "I'm very rusty with networks ... but if I had that problem, I would check these things ... if they did not turn out to be the cause, I would start looking to Google and my teammates for ideas." . "I'd have to google how to do that, but I'm familiar with the concept on a general level."

Don't let saying "I don't know" ruin your interview. They are to see what you know and what you can do. I don't know doesn't mean you don't get the job. Shows self-awareness of your skill set. Just don't answer everything with I don't know. Once or twice in an interview it is not the end of the world, the occurrence of the end of the prospect. Especially in a technical field. Honestly ... if you know everything I ask for in an interview, I'll keep digging until I find something you don't know. If you dig a lot deeper than my team does ... I'd probably suggest I don't hire you. You will get bored and you will go.

Never say or do during the interview

Never look anywhere - keep eye contact

Never play with things in your hand: keep your hands steady, the correct posture, your back straight, your hands and legs extended

Never sit in a chair without a handshake when asked to take a seat: always have a smile, a firm handshake, courtesy

Never go to an interview without a copy of your resume - keep extra copies as HR may take one and you may be asked to meet with the manager for the second round.

Never go with casual clothes, no matter what type of interview it is: jeans, slippers, T-shirt are strict, no, no. Business casual is fine, but check

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Never say or do during the interview

Never look anywhere - keep eye contact

Never play with things in your hand: keep your hands steady, the correct posture, your back straight, your hands and legs extended

Never sit in a chair without a handshake when asked to take a seat: always have a smile, a firm handshake, courtesy

Never go to an interview without a copy of your resume - keep extra copies as HR may take one and you may be asked to meet with the manager for the second round.

Never go with casual clothes, no matter what type of interview it is: jeans, slippers, T-shirt are strict, no, no. Business casual is okay, but check with HR if it's okay.

Never carry anything that makes sounds, key rings with bells, charms in your purse, wristbands or bracelets. Keep it very simple so you don't draw attention beyond your own abilities.

Never be late for your interview. In fact, arrive before the interview time, waiting 10 minutes is fine rather than giving the wrong impression.

Never do phone interviews when people are around, always find a quiet place to talk. It is your potential employer that you are speaking with which may be the best company to work for you.

Never answer the call and say hello when it is a scheduled interview, always answer with your name so the person knows you are calling the correct number.

Never conduct a Skype interview with internet issues, you only get one chance to impress, don't screw that up due to poor connectivity.

Last but not least, never end the conversation without leaving a positive note to the interviewer, it is icing on the cake when you end a conversation well enough that the person remembers all the candidates they can interview.

I have experienced both the road, as an interviewer as well as an interviewee. I can say from my experience that one should not ask any questions until the interviewer has provided an opportunity to ask the interviewee. it's actually a one-sided game. you are completely available to the interviewer.

I remember being asked questions in an interview that weren't necessary at all for the job. and they even informed me for which profile they are interviewing me. this was very unusual.

and in another interview, the questions were related to my brothers

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I have experienced both the road, as an interviewer as well as an interviewee. I can say from my experience that one should not ask any questions until the interviewer has provided an opportunity to ask the interviewee. it's actually a one-sided game. you are completely available to the interviewer.

I remember being asked questions in an interview that weren't necessary at all for the job. and they even informed me for which profile they are interviewing me. this was very unusual.

and in another interview, the questions were related to my brothers and sisters. what they are doing and their business. I mean how are they related to my work with the company in the future.

But the bottom line is, we can't ask them. we can't ask you why we are supposed to answer your unrelated questions as well.

therefore, it is wise to restrict yourself while elaborating on yourself and your surroundings in an interview. talk less, talk to the point. speak only what has been asked of you, not beyond that. The moment you speak in a different way than you are supposed to, you are creating another problem in the form of critical questions on that topic.

thanks for asking…

Don't badmouth your previous employer. A couple of weeks ago we had a candidate who did that and everyone left wondering if he was just looking for an escape route and probably wouldn't stay long.

Don't talk about your personal life. Another candidate (a man) got very angry with a boy he was dating. Either you feel very comfortable in your life or you are trying to raise a possible discrimination claim in case you are overlooked. He made us feel uncomfortable, not because of his sexual orientation, we have many co-workers of it, but because of the use of examples from his dating history in response.

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Don't badmouth your previous employer. A couple of weeks ago we had a candidate who did that and everyone left wondering if he was just looking for an escape route and probably wouldn't stay long.

Don't talk about your personal life. Another candidate (a man) got very angry with a boy he was dating. Either you feel very comfortable in your life or you are trying to raise a possible discrimination claim in case you are overlooked. He made us uncomfortable, not because of his sexual orientation, we have many co-workers of it, but because of using examples from his dating history to answer questions about software engineering.

Don't hunch over or text during the interview. Turn off the phone, completely off. Once I was in an interview and my phone rang, I fumbled trying to silence it and the interviewers thought I was texting. I didn't get the job for that.

Don't avoid eye contact, it makes you seem insincere. Smile, show a lot of interest in everything that is said, stay alert and receptive. Laugh a lot if you can, make everyone feel comfortable around you.

Even if this is how you feel, when the interviewer asks you "why do you want to work here?", Don't say "I'm not sure I do, I was hoping you could sell me this place." If that had happened to me too, you didn't get an offer.

I suggest not talking about projects that are irrelevant to the role you are playing! Let's say you are a computer science student and you have done an internship in digital marketing. This clearly tells them that you are missing the address. But yes, if you have done it from a reputable organization, mention it and be prepared for the possible question.

Say “Why did you choose to work with this or that organization as a digital marketing intern as a computer science student? “Based on the previous example mentioned.

Another thing you should never tell an interviewer is that you need the

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I suggest not talking about projects that are irrelevant to the role you are playing! Let's say you are a computer science student and you have done an internship in digital marketing. This clearly tells them that you are missing the address. But yes, if you have done it from a reputable organization, mention it and be prepared for the possible question.

Say “Why did you choose to work with this or that organization as a digital marketing intern as a computer science student? “Based on the previous example mentioned.

Another thing you should never tell an interviewer is that you need the job to deal with the financial crisis, although the main reason is for that! This portrays you as a business person and he might have the opinion that you could leave the company if you get another high paying job! That would be a waste of time for them.

1. Do not speak badly of your company, do not say bad things about people, whether you like the company or not, you do not have to speak badly of people and the company.

2. Don't ask them, so what is your company doing here? What are you really doing here? that shows that he has not done any research, no preparation on the company.

3. Don't say, I know I don't have much experience, but while you are honest with the statement, it starts with something negative and that is not good.

4. Don't say I'm very nervous. This is a negative statement, practically everyone is nervous about your intentions.

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1. Do not speak badly of your company, do not say bad things about people, whether you like the company or not, you do not have to speak badly of people and the company.

2. Don't ask them, so what is your company doing here? What are you really doing here? that shows that he has not done any research, no preparation on the company.

3. Don't say, I know I don't have much experience, but while you are honest with the statement, it starts with something negative and that is not good.

4. Don't say I'm very nervous. This is a negative statement, practically everyone is nervous in their interview, so relax. The interview panel will accept that you are nervous, but remember that you are skilled and qualified.

If you want to learn more, you don't need to worry as there is an amazing opportunity for you where experienced mentors are always there to teach you. In my opinion, Talent Serve is the right platform for you. It will always tell you where you can improve and make a better impression by improving yourself.

I won't tell you what not to do ... I'll tell you what to do ... Based on my experience from around 5 to 6 important interviews. I changed 4 companies. Every time the interview happens ... before that, try to do a basic search for the questions that can be asked and prepare them based on your understanding of the question ... if you want the interview to ask about a particular topic, try divert attention to that topic by giving it answers that may raise more questions. if someone a ...

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The following are the things you should never say in a job interview:

  1. Never use negative words in any answer.
  2. Avoid saying "I don't know", instead say anything you know is related to that topic and add "I know something about this and ask if that is what you are looking for." Employers are human too, most of the time they want to see your approach and it doesn't matter if it's right or wrong.
  3. Never say anything bad about your previous employer or your job, even if something bad may have happened to you.
  4. Don't be frank when answering questions, understand the question and respond politely. You can
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The following are the things you should never say in a job interview:

  1. Never use negative words in any answer.
  2. Avoid saying "I don't know", instead say anything you know is related to that topic and add "I know something about this and ask if that is what you are looking for." Employers are human too, most of the time they want to see your approach and it doesn't matter if it's right or wrong.
  3. Never say anything bad about your previous employer or your job, even if something bad may have happened to you.
  4. Don't be frank when answering questions, understand the question and respond politely. You can also ask for a few seconds to think about the answer.
  5. Most importantly, do not share any additional personal information that you are not supposed to share with the employer.

- Don't badmouth previous employers or companies you've worked for.

  • Religion or politics
  • Your sex life / personal life. Even if you are married and have children, don't talk about them at first. You want the prospective employer to know YOU, not your family.
  • Things that are not relevant to work (like where you went to dinner and drinks with your friends, or on vacation last week or what kind of new car you just bought).
  • In general, it is best not to talk too much during the first interview. That is, do not volunteer information. Let them ask you the questions, don't just babble or try to do the prom.
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- Don't badmouth previous employers or companies you've worked for.

  • Religion or politics
  • Your sex life / personal life. Even if you are married and have children, don't talk about them at first. You want the prospective employer to know YOU, not your family.
  • Things that are not relevant to work (like where you went to dinner and drinks with your friends, or on vacation last week or what kind of new car you just bought).
  • In general, it is best not to talk too much during the first interview. That is, do not volunteer information. Let them ask you the questions, don't just babble or try to do a self-promotion in an effort to kill what seem like awkward silences.

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