What are some good work-from-home jobs for a stay-at-home mom?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Ean Cunningham



What are some good work-from-home jobs for a stay-at-home mom?

Taking care of the kids!

There is the strange idea that it is possible to do anything else at the moment when one is responsible for an infant, toddler, or preschooler.

It is not. Young children require constant supervision, except when they are asleep. Most people discover a way to incorporate caregiving into household chores, such as shopping and housework, but anything that cannot be put aside in a moment due to a child's needs is practically ruled out. If the primary caregiver needs to be able to focus on paid work other than providing care, they will probably need to hire someone to take care of it.

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Taking care of the kids!

There is the strange idea that it is possible to do anything else at the moment when one is responsible for an infant, toddler, or preschooler.

It is not. Young children require constant supervision, except when they are asleep. Most people discover a way to incorporate caregiving into household chores, such as shopping and housework, but anything that cannot be put aside in a moment due to a child's needs is practically ruled out. If the primary caregiver is going to be able to focus on a salaried job other than providing care, they will probably need to hire someone to take care of it.

Some moms make some money by becoming caregivers for other people's children; this can work quite well, if you get along with intruders.

When children enter school, things get very relaxed on this front. There are some open hours that others are caring for, and school-age children are independent enough that a parent can spend an hour or two working from home while working on their homework. homework or playing outside after school.

I started working from home for a software company when my children were high school students. This made me very popular with their friends' working parents, because it was okay for their friends to come and spend days off from school at our house. There was lax supervision (i.e. an adult in the house in case something really went wrong) but most of all, the kids were left alone to play cards, video games, or whatever they wanted. I couldn't supervise homework or anything like that, and was mostly in my office with the door closed, except for the occasional strategic cruise through the living room while refilling the coffee.

There is a reason that caring for young children costs so much. It requires almost 100% concentration. Therefore, it is best to plan to pay someone else to provide it if the parents are not available.

I was a stay at home mom until my children were one and three years old. I started my job search right after the birth of my son because we had started the divorce proceedings.

While we were married, we moved to bring my husband closer to his job. As a result, my previous job was hours from our current home. The area was a tourist community and local jobs did not pay enough to cover daycare for two children and also required hours of work that did not align with childcare. After a year, I found a job in my field and the trip, including dropping off the kids at the daycare near my place of work, was 2.5 hours each way.

I

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I was a stay at home mom until my children were one and three years old. I started my job search right after the birth of my son because we had started the divorce proceedings.

While we were married, we moved to bring my husband closer to his job. As a result, my previous job was hours from our current home. The area was a tourist community and local jobs did not pay enough to cover daycare for two children and also required hours of work that did not align with childcare. After a year, I found a job in my field and the trip, including dropping off the kids at the daycare near my place of work, was 2.5 hours each way.

I packed a cooler every morning. The three-year-old could open go-gurts and juice / water boxes for herself and her brother in the back seat. The nursery provided lunch.

I took my lunch break to breastfeed my son before afternoon nap and then ate lunch at my desk. This kept milk supply, the need to express milk, and nighttime feedings high to just two per night.

I learned that the local hospital close to work offered "sick day care" for a reasonable fee. Children new to daycare get very sick and they shared all those germs with me. After a year, they rarely caught a cold. That first year I had laryngitis four times.

Learn to know if school is closed due to the weather.

Cleanliness was not that important. I used the television to keep the kids busy while I made dinner. The car was rarely washed. Finding a way to shop for groceries without the kids was helpful and I eventually used a grocery delivery service. 16 years later I am still using the grocery service and hired cleaning and lawn care staff. I tried the crock pot and frozen meals she cooked on the weekends, but that wasn't helpful for me, but it could be for you.

At work, find other working moms. Make friends with them over a cup of coffee. Learn from them how to negotiate company culture with working parents. Take advantage of the daycare deduction through your business if it is offered to you. It is likely to be more generous than the fed child care tax credit.

When I made the decision to be a stay at home mom, I didn't take it lightly. As a former human resources consultant, I know what potential employers tend to think about the big glaring gaps in your work history. Actually, it can also be a leper. It is not easy to "go back to" something you have not been doing for many years, especially if your chosen profession is one that is subject to frequent innovations, reinventions, and reinnovations. Yes, that's a word I just made up. However, it seems legit, right? My advice is to prepare to reinvent yourself as a stay-at-home mom and part-time workforce member.

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When I made the decision to be a stay at home mom, I didn't take it lightly. As a former human resources consultant, I know what potential employers tend to think about the big glaring gaps in your work history. Actually, it can also be a leper. It is not easy to "go back to" something you have not been doing for many years, especially if your chosen profession is one that is subject to frequent innovations, reinventions, and reinnovations. Yes, that's a word I just made up. However, it seems legit, right? My advice is to prepare to reinvent yourself as a stay-at-home mom and part-time workforce member.

Working part-time has huge benefits: Extra income is never a bad thing, especially when you have kids and one of you is staying home. You probably know this already, but kids are expensive. Money is flying out of your house faster than Mary Poppins on meth. It's not sexy money either. You spend it on things that suck, like ER visits and thousands of pairs of miniature boxers. Any extra money is good money.

I think the best thing about working part time is that it eliminates the problem of a crazy gap in the resume. And when I say part-time, I mean a few hours a week. I am a music therapist and currently spend exactly three hours a week leading therapy groups and teaching graduate students. In exchange for that miniscule time commitment, I can write Music Therapy Supervisor on my resume as an ongoing job, and let it not be a false lie. And of course I can do the things that I have a master's degree in while still being primarily a stay at home mom. It allows me to keep a hand in my chosen field so I don't have to start from scratch to learn all those silly innovations a few years from now.

If it's an option for you, being a stay-at-home, work-at-home parent is the best of all possible worlds. You will never have to change your pajamas, you will have the privilege (and the curse) of having your children hanging over you all day, you will be able to work in your spare time, earn extra money and keep up with useful skills that will help you. help your resume (and you) stay afloat for years to come.

So, in short, reinvent. Let's make that word happen together.

I don't mean to be obnoxious, but let me make this rebuttal to your unspoken assumption:

You and your wife cannot assume that the workforce will take you with open arms when you are ready to return.

Too many women are a testament to the dangers of not being able to work when they need it most. That's the flaw in this question: the assumption that you can come back any time you want. There are highly educated and experienced people walking around the unemployed who are experiencing rebuttals to the assumption that experience and education warrant ent.

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I don't mean to be obnoxious, but let me make this rebuttal to your unspoken assumption:

You and your wife cannot assume that the workforce will take you with open arms when you are ready to return.

Too many women are a testament to the dangers of not being able to work when they need it most. That's the flaw in this question: the assumption that you can come back any time you want. There are highly educated and experienced people walking around unemployed who are experiencing rebuttals to the assumption that experience and education guarantee entry into the workforce anytime one wants to join.

The best thing you can do is find a way to stay in the workforce, even if you go back to school. I say this for the following reasons:

1) Today leaving the squad is a risky proposition for anyone. A generation ago, if a person wanted to get a job after an extended absence, such as raising children, it was still possible to do so. Nowadays, if you are out of work for more than six months, it is impossible to find a job. Ask any of the long-term unemployed about that. And women who want to get back into the workforce, well, it's not happening to many of them:

Moms who choose to work find their doors closed - CNN.com

2) Your future financial security will be at risk. Every year that you don't work is a year that you don't put money away for your retirement, not in a 401 (k) or in Social Security. It also means that your salary will be lower than what you could have earned if you had stayed in the workforce. And since women generally outlive men (I'm assuming you're a man, sorry if that's not the case), and they're generally younger than their spouses, it's a safe bet that you'll be left behind at some point. Without a stable source of income, you could be preparing for a diminished retirement lifestyle after you've "shed the bitter bonds of the earth."

3) It will be difficult for her to re-enter the workforce at the same level she is at now. Think about it: you will be gone for at least six years, if not more (assuming you have only one child). That means any knowledge you have will be out of date, especially if you work in a technical field. That will mean that everything you have accomplished to date will be basically in vain. Do you really want to throw that away? I expect to get a lot of criticism in the comment section, but I'm just talking about reality; Again, we are talking about a job market where people who have not worked for more than six months find that employers will not. hire them. If six months out of work disqualifies them, then you can bet that six years out of the workforce won't help.

4) What will happen if you lose your job, die, or get divorced? You are only in control of one of those scenarios. You can decide to stay married, but you cannot decide whether to keep working or when to leave this land. If she dies or is disabled, or leaves her job (which is far more so now than it would have happened in her father's generation), will she be able to take up the mantle and continue to raise her children and keep the family together financially? Many women find themselves in a world of pain when the breadwinner is no longer around or unable to work.

5) I hate to say it, but 40 is considered old. If your wife is going to try to rejoin the workforce in her forties with no work history, she will have a very bad time. She will compete with people who are half her age, which means they have more years to give to a potential employer and will receive less money for the job she wants. Age discrimination is a real thing, even for people who are not left out of the workforce as long as their wife is planning:

Older workers are the most affected by long-term unemployment

This is:

In a series of focus groups with the GAO, older workers said they experienced age discrimination, and at least one person interviewed said that "local employers had asked her to exclude all applicants over 40," the report says. . When older workers find work, they generally suffer bigger pay cuts than younger workers. The average income replacement rate for workers ages 55 to 64 who lost their jobs from 2007 to 2009 was 85 percent, compared to about 95 percent for workers ages 25 to 54, the GAO found.

So what can she do?

Find out whether or not you can job-share / go part-time. Many companies would probably be willing to let you work part time. If you have a job now, you can research it or start looking for a job that will allow it.

Can you work from home? Teleworking may be a possibility. Even if you can't work from home all the time, maybe a job where you only have to go to the office once or twice a week is feasible.

Can you start a business / do consulting work? You would be generating income and have something to put on a resume if you decide you want to work for someone else.

Can you figure something out to make your job requirements match hers? If you have a job where your hours are flexible or you can work remotely, can you change to accommodate it?

Are there places that kids can spend the day that you trust? In laws, family members, a neighbor who runs a nursery?

Again, I know that stay-at-home women feel like they are doing something that is vital enough to convince them to give up working for a living, and I respect that. However, for me, it's not about judging the options, or elevating paid work above parenting, or making SAHMs feel stupid or lazy or whatever, or making working women they feel like selfish, neglectful, second-rate parents. For me, it comes down to this: it's about being realistic about being able to take care of yourself and your children if the need arises, and positioning yourself so that you can. In this day and age, I am totally against anyone who completely renounces the ability to earn a living. No one should be in a position that they can't,

Therefore, I encourage your wife to really think about it before she decides to completely quit smoking.

I don't know what you did before.

You could accept an entry-level job in that career or an entry-level job in another area.

I returned to work for the mere opportunity to meet the director of a temp agency at our table at a benefit dance. She said her job was to get women back into the workforce. So I called that agency, took speed typing and other aptitude tests (and a spelling test), and pretty soon I had my first job as a receptionist. Interesting because I had never worked in an office before, but didn't want to go back to nursing; He wanted a job where he would be at home during school holidays.

That first month of 3

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I don't know what you did before.

You could accept an entry-level job in that career or an entry-level job in another area.

I returned to work for the mere opportunity to meet the director of a temp agency at our table at a benefit dance. She said her job was to get women back into the workforce. So I called that agency, took speed typing and other aptitude tests (and a spelling test), and pretty soon I had my first job as a receptionist. Interesting because I had never worked in an office before, but didn't want to go back to nursing; He wanted a job where he would be at home during school holidays.

That first 3-month contract turned into a 9-month contract and then it prepared me for other jobs. That one, they urged me to apply to enter the Public Service; In another secretary job at a community service organization, replacing until I was replaced, I was urged to apply for the permanent job. (I didn't either; I wanted to retain the ability to be at home when necessary.)

The agency also had a permanent job section that you could have applied to, and they also acted as agents to interview people for those jobs who were not employees of the agency.

So it was a good start, but, like you, I was nervous about it, and only had a day's notice to get some kind of office wardrobe to match and match instead of my stay-at-home mom mess.

Years ago I had a good book that said, see what else you've been doing over the years that would work well on a job application. Have you volunteered, what, what did you do? Then you're posting here on Quora, presumably you can handle email too, have other computer skills, those are important too. And you're writing, so that will get you through the door too. Job postings often include minimum word-per-minute speeds, but in reality, no one seems to check their speeds, and generally speeds aren't really necessary.

It is a change of clothes, of learning to interact in the workplace with adults again, a big change in routine: at first you constantly stop by the stores to buy the essentials you forgot, such as milk or bread, and opt for the faster and easier. dinners.

So it's no wonder we're nervous, but that goes away pretty soon once you actually do it.

A little context before we begin ...

I have been a work-from-home parent since 2006. I am currently 39 years old. I left behind a dream film studio position so that our first (and now second) son could have a full-time father there somehow. We then moved more than 2,000 miles from Hollywood and back to our home state of Wisconsin to raise our children close to family.

Now, I admit that I had the unique ability to earn a living as a screenwriter, which gave me the opportunity to not have to work in an office. However, living so far from Hollywood drastically took me away

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A little context before we begin ...

I have been a work-from-home parent since 2006. I am currently 39 years old. I left behind a dream film studio position so that our first (and now second) son could have a full-time father there somehow. We then moved more than 2,000 miles from Hollywood and back to our home state of Wisconsin to raise our children close to family.

Now, I admit that I had the unique ability to earn a living as a screenwriter, which gave me the opportunity to not have to work in an office. However, living so far from Hollywood drastically took away my opportunities for various writing jobs. I got to the point where I'd have a good year and then I'd be dry for a year or two with no guarantees that another writing job would come.

On top of that, he only had an unsatisfactory high school education to speak of. He had no college degree. I was fortunate to have some success as a screenwriter, however it is a very competitive industry and all the odds were already against me, only to increase when I moved out of Hollywood.

Keep in mind that my kids are currently 9 and 6 years old ... far from the free ages of high school or college. But, I needed / wanted to get some income.

So what did I do?

I began to explore my options.

What anyone in this situation should do is simply assess themselves.

There is no single answer to this question beyond that. Assess your wants, needs, abilities, availability, etc.

You want to do?


It really is a simple question. In my eyes, life is short. Just winning a paycheck and nothing else is dying a slow and miserable death.

Stay-at-home parents (moms or dads) have a unique opportunity to play a vital role in their children's lives. Now, I'm not saying those stay-at-home parents don't have that. Not at all. My wife, who works full time in an outstanding career, is a super mom. She is amazing, despite not being home as much as I am (both guys are in school full time now, mind you, beyond the summer months).

This is a unique opportunity for any parent and their children. Hug him.

But you also have to access what you want to do in the grand scheme of things.

  • Want to take a complete break from the workforce?
  • Do you want to work nights when your partner comes home (Ugh, please don't)?
  • Want to explore virtual office opportunities where you can work remotely for any business? We are in the 21st century and WE ARE in a period of technological boom with no end in sight.
  • Do you want to explore the career of your dreams that you have always wanted to do? Now or later? Maybe you want to write a novel? You may want to blog about your parenting experience. Maybe you want to do scripts (Ugh, it's a routine)? Maybe you want to paint? You may want to write a book on what it is like to do what you have chosen to do in the hope that others can benefit from your shared knowledge and experience.


What do you want to do?

When do you want to do it?


Another simple question.

  • Do you want to do whatever you decide you want to do while at home with the kids?
  • Do you want to wait until they are in school full time? Your days really do break free, and to be honest, you are now not much different from your partner who works full time.
  • Do you want to enjoy staying home and focusing solely on the children and the home until they graduate from high school?


How do you plan to do it?


This may seem like an overly complicated question, but it is not.

  • Are you going to school in the evenings or online while at home with the kids?
  • Are you going to do whatever it is you have chosen while you stay home or are you going to wait?
  • What kind of training do you need to do what you have chosen?
  • How do you plan to make the right connections and networking to do what you've chosen to do?


It really is quite simple.

It's easy for people to answer this question by saying that the world is tough and the odds are stacked against you for every year that you get older and out of the workforce. Sure, there is some truth to that, but odds mean nothing when you walk in with a plan and follow through with what the universe throws at you as you chase.

Let's talk a bit about probabilities.

So I'm a screenwriter by profession. I call myself a blue-collar screenwriter because I'm not doing six-figure deals (yet). The work is scarce and distant, but I have been more blessed than most screenwriters will experience. I defied all the odds in that regard. I didn't sign my first writing contract (with Lionsgate) until AFTER I moved 2,000 miles from Hollywood. How is that of the probabilities?

But I wanted something that would hold us on a more reliable footing.

So I just start to explore my options. I assessed my situation and found that:

  • He needed to work remotely.
  • I needed to work around my family schedule.
  • He needed to still be available to write scripts and pursue / continue that dream.


So I started to figure out my options in this regard. At first, a few years ago, I started with the closest thing to "home" in terms of experience that I had in the workforce.

I became a script reader for major screenwriting competitions.

This was something he could do remotely. Check. This was something I could work on with my family schedule. Check. This was something that I was able to easily go back to in my own screenwriting.

And all it took was a couple of emails to land that position. He had a perfect and desirable résumé (old Sony studio script reader). And I had the you-know-what to find an employer and ask. It really is that simple.

Now, let's get back to probabilities.

When I realized that I wanted a more stable income, I evaluated my situation, knowing full well that I would not be able to return to a physical workplace away from home (with the summer two wonderful children come home all the time).

Here I was with nothing more than a high school education and decided that I wanted to work in the technology industry, despite living thousands of miles from Silicon Valley and despite having no knowledge of computers, applications, coding, etc. attracted by the startup / tech community.

So what did I do?

I wrote a couple of emails after finding a company that I would love to work for.

Low and lo and behold, I have been a consultant for a successful Silicon Valley company for quite some time.

I work remotely. Check. I can work according to my family schedule. Check. I can still write scripts if assignments come in. Check.

It is simply about evaluating what you want to do, when you want to do it, and how you are going to do it.

Lastly, I'll get a little spiritual with you ...


Life is short. You do what you think is right for you and your family. I personally walked away from a dream movie studio job where I had full access to movie sets, where I played basketball and worked directly with movie stars, where I had ample opportunities to network with the many powers that be, etc. Why? Because I did what I felt was right for my family and for me.

Life will deliver it. I promise you. It will give you what you need, when you need it. It's scary to give everything to chance, but if I've experienced something on this journey that I NEVER imagined I'd be on, it's that life offers what you need when you need it ... as long as you trust it. Whether it's from a faith that you embrace or just a positive attitude.

In 10, 15 or 18 years (or sooner), opportunities will present themselves based solely on what life is ready to bring you. You will never know what will happen and how it will happen. All you can do is assess yourself and your situation beforehand and during this journey and do your best to make a real effort to make what you want to happen. Plain and simple.
Don't listen to the experts. Don't listen to the odds. Don't listen to the naysayers.

Find out what you want to do, when you want to do it and how you are going to do it ... and do it. Beyond that, let fate decide.

In the meantime, go be with your children. Enjoy it. Hug him. Know that it will not be easy. Know that it will not be everything you thought it would be. Know that you will have a feeling of regret that will surface during hectic parenting times. But know that despite all that, the fortunes you receive from this experience will far outshine the lesser moments.

Life is good. Life will deliver it. Enjoy it.

You can always make money, but the trick is to figure out what A) you can do from home and B) what you WANT to do from home.

Working takes time away from your family. And if you are a SAHM, you are probably doing it because you want to be there for your children. So before you hit the work-from-home journey, ask yourself WHY you want to work.

The responses can be classified into one of two categories:

1) Financial need
2) Personal need

If it is financial, is it at a critical level? Do you need to do as much as possible immediately? Or is it a general desire to add to the family bank account to help level up and

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You can always make money, but the trick is to figure out what A) you can do from home and B) what you WANT to do from home.

Working takes time away from your family. And if you are a SAHM, you are probably doing it because you want to be there for your children. So before you hit the work-from-home journey, ask yourself WHY you want to work.

The responses can be classified into one of two categories:

1) Financial need
2) Personal need

If it is financial, is it at a critical level? Do you need to do as much as possible immediately? Or is it a general desire to add to the family bank account to help level their standard of living? If it is crucial that you work, grab a calculator and start entering numbers; you better pay for childcare and work outside the home.

If you're looking to earn a few extra dollars to help pay for kids' guitar lessons or pay off your car loan, you have a lot more freedom in what you choose to do with your time.

  • Start a blog? I have a friend who easily earns 1K extra per month through advertising on her site. Check out Mom 2.0 for more blogging ideas.
  • Are you cunning? How about opening an Etsy shop? There are many success stories on Etsy, why not you?
  • My favorite idea is to find a solution for other local moms ... What are their pain points and how can you help? I can promise you that we moms have many weak points (washing clothes, cooking, cleaning, taking the children, lunches, chores, etc.)
  • There are plenty of other ideas that people have listed here on Quora or you can Google them.


If your desire to work from home falls into the Personal category, then you're in luck. That's the easiest to fulfill because it may not actually be the job you want. It is possible that what you really need is to feel more than a mom (because you are). Start wondering why you want to work and see where it takes you. Don't stop until you get to the heart of your desire ... every time you ask and answer a question, ask "why" over and over again.

Simply taking time to yourself is likely to satisfy your need to work because many times, once we become a mom, it consumes us and we lose our sense of ourselves. We want to feel alive again. Important again. Excited again. Like someone again. Not just someone's mom. It's about finding balance in your life. How can you give yourself while giving to others?

The good news is that there are ways to be more who you are without giving up being there for your family. Start by looking at who you were and what you did before you had children. What made you feel alive and happy? And before you get married? How did you spend your free time?

Take that list and connect it with your life today. How can you incorporate those exact or similar activities into your life now? Start small by doing one thing for yourself each day for a month and then add a new one until you start to feel whole again. Do rituals for yourself just like you do for your family. You will soon find the balance of your life.

It is possible that the work IS what you are missing. If this is the case, as it is for me, discovering what makes you happy is an exciting journey. You don't have the pressure of having to work, you do it because you want to. That is a gift. Enjoy it!

First I want to give you a very important advice and that is that you always choose your source of advice as you choose your food. There would be many who have very jaded ways of looking at the workplace and then there are people who know that you CAN return to the workforce after taking care of your family. Bravo for choosing the family first!

Well, here are some very viable and effective ways to get back into the workforce.

1) IF YOU CANNOT FIND A JOB, CREATE ONE. Use the talent that God has given you. Hire those skills that someone would pay you to do normally.

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First I want to give you a very important advice and that is that you always choose your source of advice as you choose your food. There would be many who have very jaded ways of looking at the workplace and then there are people who know that you CAN return to the workforce after taking care of your family. Bravo for choosing the family first!

Well, here are some very viable and effective ways to get back into the workforce.

1) IF YOU CANNOT FIND A JOB, CREATE ONE. Use the talent that God has given you. Hire those skills that someone would pay you to do normally. Do people congratulate you on how well you cook? Try cooking a dinner for a friend or associate, you will be surprised how well word of mouth can promote it. Handyman? Show off your skills on free sites like Buckaroo, CraigsList, or even your local newspaper. Check Entrepreneur Magazine for ideas on startups on a budget.

2) Improve your professional skills with refresher courses. If you can't pay, take free online courses with one of the many FREE online courses like Coursera. If you are in a field that requires math, try Khan Academy, it also offers courses that will help you dust off your skills and sharpen your mind thematically.

3) Sign up with various temp agencies like Robert Half. Kelly Services and even look for companies that have their own temp agencies within their organization.

4) VOLUNTEER! VOLUNTARY! VOLUNTARY! I cannot stress the importance of volunteering your time for worthy causes, company functions, and event venues. Why? Because you meet so many people from all walks of life and that's where you make your connections! A friend of mine who is a stay-at-home mom was attending her daughter's dance recital and talking to another mother about her son graduating from college. She told the other mom about the field her son would soon enter once he graduated. The mother he was talking to was the wife of a senator without her knowing it. The senators' wife told him that her husband was looking to hire someone for a Lead Budget Analyst position for the state.

There you go! Just a bit of information. To glean, the rest will come from you doing the digging and a bit of hustle and bustle. You can do it, so do it! No matter what others say, what God has for you is for YOU!

Moms at home take care of their children with a lot of free time, they can find a part-time job at home to have more income. You can refer to the way your friend makes money on Instagram, which is pretty good - Aiden Carson's answer to How do people make money through Instagram?

So what should moms do for their milk or what jobs will be suitable for moms who take care of their children?

1. Sell clean food online

In the market, there is more and more dirty food that many people worry about when consuming it, the movement of buying clean homemade food and finding more online online is increasingly favored, Moms h

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Moms at home take care of their children with a lot of free time, they can find a part-time job at home to have more income. You can refer to the way your friend makes money on Instagram, which is pretty good - Aiden Carson's answer to How do people make money through Instagram?

So what should moms do for their milk or what jobs will be suitable for moms who take care of their children?

1. Sell clean food online

In the market there is more and more dirty food making many people worry about consuming it, the movement of buying clean homemade food and finding more online online is increasingly favored, moms have been able to take advantage of this flavor to turn it into a home -Work based on moms, with some dishes like vegetable salad, yogurt, jam ... or maybe a specialty in your hometown will be very expensive. Try to embark on this mommy small business model right away, why don't you need to invest too much capital, you just need to spend a lot of time online every day?

2. Enter data at home

Those who can write quickly and master office skills, this is an additional job for the milky moms of 2019, which is suitable when they are staying at home to take care of children and want to earn additional income. Every day with free time, women can take advantage of the reception of data entry companies to work, which will also generate a reasonable income sufficient for household expenses.

However, data entry at home Moms need to be vigilant, when there are $ 400-800 monthly posts. Educate yourself carefully before joining, avoid losing unpaid or unpaid money.

3. make nail and personal makeup at home

This is a career for moms who are stable enough to help them earn money at home. Those who have makeup, or nail skills in the past, will be ideal at home, and for those who have no experience, they can take a short manicure course, or makeup that can be done at home, or open a small home shop for manicures. and personal makeup. There will be a daily income, if your store hand is full, this will also be a very good deal to generate big profit.

I wish the moms every success!

Being a homemaker is not easy, it is a full time job in itself. However, if you can put some time and energy into work to earn an income, there are many options available. A quick search on Google, Pinterest, or Quora would bring you hundreds of mixed results. Therefore, I will not waste your time or mine, repeating any of that. I will talk about what I do and my personal experience.

I have been a homemaker for 15 years and recently joined Cuemath. When I started looking for work from home, I came across network marketers like Amway, Tupperware, Avon, etc.

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Being a homemaker is not easy, it is a full time job in itself. However, if you can put some time and energy into work to earn an income, there are many options available. A quick search on Google, Pinterest, or Quora would bring you hundreds of mixed results. Therefore, I will not waste your time or mine, repeating any of that. I will talk about what I do and my personal experience.

I have been a homemaker for 15 years and recently joined Cuemath. When I started looking for work from home, I came across network marketers like Amway, Tupperware, Avon, etc. I must admit I tried and burned my hands more than once in network marketing. There is nothing wrong with the business or its model; all my fault. It wasn't cut out for marketing stuff. But I learned a very important life lesson, which was learning about my skill set, recognizing what I was good at. A friend introduced me to Cuemath. Both the business and its purpose appealed to me. Teaching was my thing. Being a mother, that's what I've been doing for years.

For those of you, who are new to the concept of Cuemath, it is a math learning program for school children from UKG to 6th grade. Students in grades above the sixth can access the Cuemath program online. If you are passionate about math and teaching, Cuemath might be a great option for you too. You will have to take a selection test, (essential to maintain the quality of the teachers), followed by which you will receive exhaustive training to manage your own Cuemath center. This training enables you to speak to parents, get leads, and sign up. Also, even after completing training, the team still has tremendous back-end support. All inquiries are responded to and the issue is resolved in 3-4 business days.

The investment is very low. A total of around Rs7000, that's all (7000 for some teaching aids, and if you don't have a tablet, another 8000). This investment is unique, that is, there are no recurring expenses you need to incur. The fees paid by a student will be shared between you and Cuemath in a ratio of 60:40. Your share will be transferred to your account in due course. Your time is the only recurring investment you make. The more time you spend, the more you earn. Most associate professors who take 2 or 3 classes a day earn around 45,000 rupees a month. Of course, to ensure the growth of your school, you must show results to parents, which will depend on your effort and sincerity towards your students. Even this job is made easy for us,

In addition, there are other opportunities you can take advantage of, such as taking online classes for our international students. My journey with Cuemath has been more than satisfactory. If you would also like to join us, you can do so by following the link in my profile. I promise you, your life will change for the better.

Here are some examples: from home intermittently or after a child is out of school for an entire day.

Accounting if you are trained or tax filing if you are trained and are a certified public accountant or registered agent. This work can easily be done intermittently, such as when a child is sleeping or playing at daycare, where mom can trust the child to be safe without her, where mom is not expected to stay in place with him. kid.

Dressmaking, remodeling and tailoring, being a janitor, online administrative assistant, or interpreter can all be done at home. CAD-CAM Services— "Computer Aided D

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Here are some examples: from home intermittently or after a child is out of school for an entire day.

Accounting if you are trained or tax filing if you are trained and are a certified public accountant or registered agent. This work can easily be done intermittently, such as when a child is sleeping or playing at daycare, where mom can trust the child to be safe without her, where mom is not expected to stay in place with him. kid.

Dressmaking, alterations and tailoring, being a concierge ir on-line administrative assistant, or interpreter pcan be done at home. CAD-CAM services—"Computer Aided Design—can be done at home and so can online teaching and tutoring often for substantial pay.

Other lesser paying jobs, but still "not scams", are remote call center work, research, writing, editing, proofreading, travel agent, graphic design, and so forth. Such work can also be done at night and weekends and pays a good amount of money.

Some of the work above can be described as part of the "gig economy" , and unless steady enough in a high enough volume, then the money may not be enough to live on or may not be enough to really supplement or save.

However, one can also be an artist, ghost writer or author, and one can do or certain kinds of research work or transcription from electronically recorded dictation.

One can even do certain kinds of legal or paralegal work. One can do certain kinds of technical editing, writing and of proofreading.

All of the work above looks good on a resume and is good experience for either full time "work at home". Substantial money can be earned from some of the jobs above.

With substantive and "reputation vetting" research, I am sure you can find other worthwhile and "non scam" work.

There's a website, "Dough Roller", may have some ideas and leads. There may be other web sites too. In any event, good luck!

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