What are some good summer jobs for introverted teens?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Willow Ross



What are some good summer jobs for introverted teens?

I suggest jobs where the introvert can be somewhat creative, unlikely to be micromanaged, and learn a valuable skill.

My summer job was at Dunkin 'Donuts, and as a teenager it was a lot of fun. I was able to interact with customers and my supervisor was very relaxed; It was fun making banana split and those toxic blue ice drinks. I forgot what they are called. The pay was fine, but I also received a lot of tips. As for the skills I learned, I guess it was nice learning to talk to people. You realize how derivative "have a nice day" sounds; Be more creative than that!

A second suggestion is volunteering

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I suggest jobs where the introvert can be somewhat creative, unlikely to be micromanaged, and learn a valuable skill.

My summer job was at Dunkin 'Donuts, and as a teenager it was a lot of fun. I was able to interact with customers and my supervisor was very relaxed; It was fun making banana split and those toxic blue ice drinks. I forgot what they are called. The pay was fine, but I also received a lot of tips. As for the skills I learned, I guess it was nice learning to talk to people. You realize how derivative "have a nice day" sounds; Be more creative than that!

A second suggestion is volunteering at a soup kitchen. Help fill in that 'community service' slot when you apply to college. It will force you to leave your introversion behind. After I volunteered at the Holy Apostle Soup Kitchen in Chelsea, I was pretty tired; tired of witnessing too much reality. But also, super nice helping people. Typically, you will help prepare meals, chat with other volunteers, and serve as a waiter.

Introverts tend to seek balance. I don't think it necessarily means finding a job where you don't have to interact with anyone. The loss of being an introvert comes from having to do an act of joy, that is, working in a nightclub, a Walmart checkout. It would be unpleasant to spend your summer vacation mindless. Ciao

Customer service, of any kind, actually. Being forced to work and interact directly with people will be uncomfortable at first, but it will help you at least develop a basic set of social skills necessary to function in the world of work. It's okay to be an introvert, but it's possible (and a good goal) to work on your social skills without losing your sense of yourself.

Beyond that, I think everyone should have a low-level, minimum wage, customer service type job at least once while they are teenagers. Develops character through hard work, tolerance of strangers for their worst behavior, and

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Customer service, of any kind, actually. Being forced to work and interact directly with people will be uncomfortable at first, but it will help you at least develop a basic set of social skills necessary to function in the world of work. It's okay to be an introvert, but it's possible (and a good goal) to work on your social skills without losing your sense of yourself.

Beyond that, I think everyone should have a low-level, minimum wage, customer service type job at least once while they are teenagers. It builds character through hard work, tolerance of strangers for their worst behavior, and helps you appreciate what you have later in life when you have it.

Work in a library! I loved working as an assistant because there was always something to do and you rarely had to have conversations with strangers. I also liked being able to learn about new books. Another benefit is that you don't have to be outside in the scorching sun or stand around all day like in retail.

Introverts can do any job they choose. What is needed is to first understand what kind of behavior is required to be successful on the job and then use the principles of the acting method.

Through these efforts, the introvert will come to fully understand the specific temperament characteristics of an imaginary individual who is best suited for the job and, with practice, will deliver a stellar performance.

  • Library, as mentioned by another person
  • Any kind of chores like mowing the lawn, shopping, dog walking
  • Kitchen and dishwasher
  • Factory assembly (if you are over 18 years old)
  • Supermarket, storage shelves, cash register

If you are an introvert by personality, then you will find yourself a good job. This is because the career of introverts is very bright and they always tend to find a good job sooner or later.

All you need to do is find a job that interests you and put all your efforts into it. You can find good jobs during the summer if you look around you.

I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours is not exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and dealing with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an idea of ​​a boring job and therefore you will motivate just as it had motivated me not to stop doing something like

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I will give you some examples of jobs you could do. And for the ones I've personally done, I'll write some thoughts on them so you know roughly what to expect. I have also divided the jobs into self-employed and non-self-employed jobs.

NON-INDEPENDENT JOBS:

1. Distribution of brochures

Being there handing out flyers for 8 hours isn't exactly fun, but what it did teach me is patience and how to deal with rejection as a lot of people get irritated with you, it will also give you an insight into a boring job and therefore , it will motivate you just as it had motivated me not to end up doing something like that in the future, after that job, I would always tell myself that if I don't keep improving, that's what would get me and that scared the shit out of me and pushed me to go do more work.

2 waiters and banquets

This is fun. You get to meet a lot of new people that you wouldn't have met otherwise, in fact I met some people that I went back to work with later. Also, the waiter taught me a lot about how to deal with customers, especially angry or even abusive ones, in terms of how to talk to them, how to serve them, and also how to handle criticism and comments appropriately. I see this as an invaluable lesson, as in the future if you don't know how to treat your customers or handle and then respond to feedback, you are in real trouble. Also on the fun side of things, I was able to explore the hotel in its entirety, seeing places that I would not have seen and also meeting clients that I would not have met otherwise, that would be very useful contacts in the future. This one also taught me a bit about F&B. How to organize people, how to motivate them, how to make sure work is done always and to a good standard. It also gave me an idea of ​​the management structure of these types of companies, who responds to whom, etc. and it also allowed me to see what each person's work involved and how they would do it. A very good insight into the food and beverage industry.

3. Marketing executive

This is one of my favorites. You may think that this may be unattainable due to lack of workplace experience etc, but it is not. Target some really small or new businesses that really need people or others that don't have a full department, like in this case, marketing. And just for the record, before I got this job, all I had was my IGCSE exam report card, nothing more, in fact, the guy didn't even ask me for any credentials. So take the lesson, which you'll never know until you try, just go out there, bite your lip, and get the job.

It was a great job with incredible knowledge and experience. During this (ongoing) time, I was basically working for an interior design and renovation company that had essentially no digitization or online presence of any kind. My job started simply as advertising and looking for new clients who wanted home improvements. I would post ads on different sites, suggest things through word of mouth, and also make some cold calls to gather new clients who would like to rebuild their houses in exchange for a% commission. Later, along with one of my best friends, they asked me to start bringing online presence (we were the only two types of marketers in the company), as you can see now, we started juggling two jobs, both marketing and prospecting for new customers. I continued to run ads and get a couple of inquiries and closing deals from time to time, ad serving and customer prospecting taught me things like writing your ads in an attractive way and also serving substantial content in your ads to build trust among customers. potentials. Useful stuff but not adequate experience as a whole

However, the real learning came from the online marketing experience. I learned so many things that maybe I only learned in 5 years when I took my finger out of my butt, however this opportunity taught me things early on that I think would be invaluable later on in my ambitions of going into business / entrepreneurship, especially this one. digital age. The experience taught me about content marketing, how to eliminate clutter and keep putting better and better content. I started writing articles for the company that would be useful to consumers and hopefully translate into sales. I learned about SEO (how to make my website have better search rankings in Google) so that more people can locate the website and also drive traffic to it effectively. I learned how to use analytics to track progress and constantly improve my campaign. I learned how to use CMS to create attractive websites also without coding (Website Development). This also gave me the opportunity to run a social media marketing campaign, giving me insight into what worked and what didn't, and what consumers would respond to and what they didn't like. This opportunity also allowed me to see the market prices for home improvement in the country, which led me to save my family a lot of money when a contractor came up and tried to scam my family. Overall, this experience gave me an opportunity to learn more about the internet and what happens online, and it also taught me a bit about how online marketing works and how it could improve. Without this job I would never have opened my eyes to this online marketing and would probably only learn these things in a few years (when it really mattered), while others my age were already geniuses at it. .

4. Sales executive

Another one of my favorites. This job taught me a lot in my ambition to be a great salesperson. I also had the opportunity to meet other people I would never have met otherwise, such as full-time programmers, designers, and other salespeople, and it also gave me my first experience of true corporate life. If you are outgoing and enjoy persuading and talking to people, this type of work will be great for you.

My job here was to sell B2B to F&B establishments a custom restaurant mobile app that was created by a group of Indian programmers who were also part of the company. He needed to cold call and email potential restaurants that might have been interested in him. Later he would have to arrange a meeting with the manager of the establishment and try to sell the application to his company. This was an extremely fun job, especially the meeting with the heads of the restaurant and all the sales part that is exciting, especially when a deal is closed. As for the telemarketing part of the job, it taught me a lot about how to handle severe rejection, especially when telemarketing you're hung up 90% of the time.

This was also a job that I had been dying for because I knew I would be successful later on, especially in my business ambitions, I would have to know how to sell things, otherwise I would die a slow and painful death.

First of all, this work squashed my earlier take on salespeople as charismatic people who just mix, have a killer speech, make the guy drool, and then sell you the product and show off on commission in 30 seconds.

I also had the opportunity to attend company funded seminars / talks on how to be a better seller and what not, and also to deepen my understanding of the product and the areas to cover or target when trying to sell the product to a specific group of customers. , etc. ... I learned a lot about patience, especially in difficult situations (I am impatient by nature), dealing with difficult questions or even criticism from customers, and how to respond appropriately and quickly without sounding like an idiot. And also how to behave and improve my speaking skills in general.

And again, not to mention the contacts I made while working there, from managers, designers, programmers, or just desk workers who could share with me what their experiences are like.

If I hadn't gotten this job, I would never have learned the vast things that I had the opportunity to learn in terms of sales techniques, and also just building networks with both my clients and my coworkers.

5. Retail assistant:

My job at the chocolate retail store was to help customers with their purchases and make sure the shelves were neat and clean and that we had enough inventory. Although I learned a lot of valuable lessons and got some great ideas, the foundational work itself wasn't particularly fun or challenging, especially during periods when there are no customers or they don't need help and you end up just walking around the store in limbo.


INDEPENDENT WORKS:

- WEB DEVELOPMENT

This is a great skill to have in life and it can also be very financially rewarding. There is an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, who need help building a website or who need some work related to web development so that you always have the opportunity to get jobs in freelance communities that pay quite well in addition to that. .

Even outside of the autonomous communities, there are tons of small micro or small businesses in your neighborhood or area or whatever that also need help getting a company website or having some kind of website for clients. On the other hand, you can connect with these people. They didn't care about your age as long as you do the work, plus you don't technically work for them, you just made an informal arrangement. Yes, you have some learning that you must learn to catch up, but it will be worth it and reap its rewards. Trust me.

- SEO & DIGITAL MARKETING.

Another fantastic skill especially in a world dominated by the internet. Like web development, this is another skill that seems to have an endless supply of people, at least for the foreseeable future, demanding both in autonomous communities and among small businesses. All entrepreneurs want to be on the first page of Google, they want a good reach on social media, they want to interact with their audience, they want to build their brand online, implement content marketing, etc. Often they don't have the time or don't know how to do it at all. This is where you can come in and offer your services. Note that these also pay quite well.

However, again, you will have to learn and acquire these skills to a business standard in order to monetize effectively. Will it take time and hard work to learn? Hell yeah! Will it be worth the time invested? Hell yeah! If you have pure ambition, nothing can stop you from going from point A to B. If you want to earn money and have a job like no other 14-year-old, behave and learn like no other 14-year-old.

- DESIGN.

Yet another fantastic skill to have, not to mention profitable. Having the skills of a web developer, digital marketer, and designer together makes for an amazing combination. You will literally be a wrecking ball. If you can do all three right, people will fight for you to be the guy who works on their projects. From first needing to hire 3 people to cover these aspects, now they have a 14 year old 3 in 1 beast they can trust. I'm still trying to think of a better freelancer that I can hire.

Again, there are tons of people who don't know how to use design software (Photoshop, Illustrator, Sketch, Final Cut, Premiere, etc.) or may not have the time to do so. Masses and masses of people both online and offline. Like the previous two skills, there seems to be an endless supply of people for the foreseeable future who need help designing things, which is again where you can step in and continually fill that void. Obviously, this will require some substantial learning as well, but again, it will pay off in the long run both for doing work for others and for your own endeavors. Remember, you have time. Also, how much easier would it be to attract clients if they want design services, but can you also add some web development or SEO? You immediately become a more attractive person to work with.

- COPYWRITING.

Learn some copywriting. It's another brilliant and in-demand skill, especially at a young age when you have plenty of time to practice. A lot of people can't write a copy for shit and they will reach out and be willing to make a lot of money (I've heard of people who can charge $ 80-100 + for 500 words) to get a good copy of their products and what not.

If you don't know what it is, copywriting is basically writing something like a 'sales pitch' on ads, websites (online), etc. that gets potential customers and customers to take action, whether it's to buy something. or subscribe, depending on the seller. It goes without saying that writing good copy is a skill that needs to be practiced, analyzed and learned, so once again you will have to invest time and hard work to master this; However, it goes without saying once again, it is a skill that is absolutely worth having. A great skill for you, but also one that is demanded and can be easily monetized both with independent online search engines and with small businesses and startups that need to push their product.

If you're not sure how to get clients, here are some things you can try:

- Offer to speak on the phone or Skype with them to discuss exactly what you will do for them and give them a breakdown of the costs you will charge them. This helps the potential client feel more comfortable and happy working with you because you have really made the effort to make contact with them and are keeping them informed. I would definitely feel a little awkward if I was paying a guy that I can't even see on the other end and who I have no idea why they are charging me what they charge. Don't let your clients feel that. Leave those thoughts at rest. Establish trust the first time you make contact and build on it. I prefer to work with someone with less experience but who I can trust rather than someone who could be better but who I cannot trust at all. Consumer confidence online is fragile, especially when it comes to money. Put those fears to rest.

- Offer some small services for free to establish a relationship that you are not there to rip them off. Offer to submit work samples or drafts of what you are going to do before you start on the really paid stuff. This helps build confidence that you are genuine and legitimate and that you want to help them. Doing a few things for free also helps build a portfolio, which is crucial. You may think that doing things for free the first few times defeats the purpose of making money. You don't though, think long-term instead of short-term, make small short-term sacrifices, and in the long run, you will reap the benefits and your returns will be better rather than if you try to start annoying people with the starting price. If you sow generosity, you will reap generosity.

- Talk to your customers not as objects or business partners with whom you earn money, but as human beings and friends whom you are trying to help solve a problem. Again, it helps the trust aspect of the deal and also allows your client to sleep soundly knowing that their money has gone to someone with whom they have little more than a business relationship.

- Offer your customers discounts if they return or discounts for their friends. It gives them a sense of exclusivity that everyone loves.

- Just do your job well and to the best of your ability. Nothing is a better motivator for customers to come to you than a job well done. Everyone has to start somewhere. What matters is what you do once you start. Also keep in mind that people are willing to pay for quality. Maybe you can say that your programming skills are not great or that you do not know digital marketing. That's fine. Start learning them and improving your application to the point of commercial use. Dont be lazy. Nothing worthwhile is easy, definitely not money. Work hard now to learn it, and in the long run, you will appreciate it. Remember, you are 14 years old, you have time!

Hope this helped!

We tried.

Do you want to know where all the teenagers have gone?

About five years ago, I started my job search. It was time to stop relying on household chores to pay for subsidies and it was time to earn some real money. Of course, I did not have to pay much. I was just looking to gain some experience and fill my pockets.

First of all, all the fast food places refused to look at me. Those online forms end your session when you check the 'Under 18' box. Going in person just redirected me to the online form. "Sorry, this is how the company wants it to be done."

At the local McDonald's, the manager followed th

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We tried.

Do you want to know where all the teenagers have gone?

About five years ago, I started my job search. It was time to stop relying on household chores to pay for subsidies and it was time to earn some real money. Of course, I did not have to pay much. I was just looking to gain some experience and fill my pockets.

First of all, all the fast food places refused to look at me. Those online forms end your session when you check the 'Under 18' box. Going in person just redirected me to the online form. "Sorry, this is how the company wants it to be done."

At the local McDonald's, the manager kept saying, "Besides, no one here will be leaving anytime soon." With a thumb raised over his shoulder to his cane, all of whom looked to have been old enough to remember the Bay of Pigs like it was yesterday.

So, I went to the nearby nurseries and boutiques. They didn't want me to work the loading docks or the storage containers. The supermarkets didn't want me to help collect the shopping carts, reasoning that they gave those jobs to local college students. All summer camps responded by mail saying they were for volunteers only. I even went over to the nearby golf course to see if they needed golf ball pickup or any other little work.

The woman who ran the place tapped her nails on the counter and clicked. "Those days are over." I remember she said. He walked with me after explaining that all labor laws would give him a headache if he tried to hire me.

I ended up driving to Montana to work for my grandfather. It was good money that bought me a laptop at the end of the summer, but no place in Washington would touch me.

In my senior year I was lucky enough to get into a Hallmark run by a mother whose daughter played in the animation band with me. Even though I was several months before 18, she was willing to overlook it and took me on board.

Do you want to know where all the teenagers have gone?

Out of camp. Inside watching movies. Hanging out with friends. Travel as a family. But wherever they go, it's not for their summer job because apparently older generations decided they weren't ready for the world of work until the clock strikes midnight in their 18th year.

Do you want them to come back?

Use a little common sense.

EDIT: Thanks everyone for the kind comments. Just a few things I want to clarify:

  • Now I am 21 years old and I have a guaranteed job. This was written based on my past experiences. However, thank you for all the job offers.
  • Yes, it is probably a local problem. Washington acts liberally and my area tends to take that action and run screaming at night. However, it is my experience and a good perspective for the question.
  • This is not an attempt at "millennial law". I never said anything against the older generation to indicate that they are "useless" or "need to get out of the way." Inflammatory taunts like that will be erased if you insist on commenting on them. I am not asking for a / your job; I ask that you give me a chance. (Of course the point is moot now, see point one).

In the library he ran we had two high school students who worked alternately on weekends and after school for a year. Their duties included shelving, well everyone does some shelving, but customer service was the main part of the job. Most of the unskilled library jobs in a public library have to do primarily with customer service, so the kinds of skills you need are: confidence and patience to help people of all ages and backgrounds, proficient with computers, good personal presentation, good literacy and numeracy. I also invited them to help with vacation programs if they were available, plus

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In the library he ran, we had two high school students who worked alternately on weekends and after school for a year. Their duties included shelving, well everyone does some shelving, but customer service was the main part of the job. Most of the unskilled library jobs in a public library have to do primarily with customer service, so the kinds of skills you need are: confidence and patience to help people of all ages and backgrounds, proficient with computers, good personal presentation, good literacy and numeracy. I also invited them to help with the holiday programs if they were available, most of these involve some degree of arts / crafts / creativity, so it is something to include on your CV. Enjoying reading is an obvious advantage, but actually computer skills will be more useful.

To prepare, go to the library in question and spend a couple of hours exploring its collection, watching the staff interact with customers, use their computers, and take a look at the digital resources they offer. If you can't get into the physical library, at least spend some time on their website.

Have a decent CV, get someone to review it with you. Use a template - A competently crafted CV is a reflection of your IT skills. Remember that libraries deal with information, not "books", the way you manage and present your own information is very relevant. Include all relevant experience, not just work experience. Most of the youngsters don't have much work experience, but if you wake up at 5 in the morning to help dad in the milking shed or you're a scout leader or you read to the elderly in a nursing home or whatever demonstrate responsibility, dedication, interpersonal skills, etc. include that.

Read and understand the job description. Write down any questions you have about what your duties will be. Make sure you can actually get to work when you're expected to - I had a student in my freshman year who couldn't actually do the hours that were specified in the job description. When we entered the second round of recruiting, more than a dozen people applied for the position who were not high school students, although that was an explicit requirement, a waste of my time and theirs, so be sure to comply with the minimum requirements of the role. Remember that it is a job, not a "work experience".

Are you ready to work? You will need an IRD (tax) number and a bank account to enter your payment. You will probably need proof of citizenship / residency, meaning that you have the right to work in that country.

Try to enjoy the interview - everyone is nervous at first, but hopefully you will have good interviewers and start to feel comfortable after a few minutes. Libraries can be wonderful places to work, good luck.

My two oldest children are teenagers and they have also struggled with social anxiety at times (as have I). It can complicate life. The good news is that it is generally easier. In the meantime, there are some ways to earn money that don't involve a lot of human contact.

My oldest daughter worked on the farm for a local farmer for a few days one summer. The work was dirty and tiring, but it didn't involve a lot of chatting or social interaction. She also made quite a bit of money in a very short time, for an unskilled 14-year-old with no work experience.

Other options include:

  • Factory
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My two oldest children are teenagers and they have also struggled with social anxiety at times (as have I). It can complicate life. The good news is that it is generally easier. In the meantime, there are some ways to earn money that don't involve a lot of human contact.

My oldest daughter worked on the farm for a local farmer for a few days one summer. The work was dirty and tiring, but it didn't involve a lot of chatting or social interaction. She also made quite a bit of money in a very short time, for an unskilled 14-year-old with no work experience.

Other options include:

  • Factory work (temp agencies often have short-term factory openings) or storage shelves.
  • Make products and sell them online through sites like etsy. Just make sure you can go online to spread the word about your products and create items that are really in demand. Items like natural wood blocks with non-toxic finishes can be made with few tools and knowledge, but they tend to sell well (especially if they are priced slightly below the competition). This is not a reliable source of income if you need fixed money to pay the bills, but it can be good if you want experience and are only looking for additional income.
  • Publish Kindle books. Some of the easiest Kindle books to sell seem to be short educational children's books with stock photos and specialty cookbooks (for example, gluten-free cookies or quick vegan dinners), especially if they are priced at 99 cents. You can even compile a bunch of themed kids jokes (101 Hilarious Animal Jokes! 50 Slammed Christmas Jokes!) With a little free clip art. If you can write fiction or non-fiction about popular children's interests like Minecraft, that's really lucrative right now, especially if you create a very short book series (give away the first book and the kids will read it and tease their parents to to buy the next book in the series). Find out how to get it right and offer them plenty of free to boost ratings and move up the "most popular" lists. Again, this is not
  • Submit drop shipping items on sites like eBay. I know very little about this, but I read a fascinating post on Quora last year from a teenager who did incredibly well researching the drop shipping business and creating his own online business.
  • Behind-the-scenes jobs like cleaning motels (especially smaller ones if you don't want a lot of human interaction, even with other staff). However, this is usually a day job, so it won't work if you're in school.
  • Pet sitting and dog walking. More and more people are paying to walk their dogs or take care of their pets while they are away, and I know of several teenagers who make a lot of money doing this. You need to be able to chat with pet owners and show that you are trustworthy, but you are alone with the animals most of the time. The easiest way to get into business is to advertise in your own neighborhood, if possible, by word of mouth.
  • Delivery of newspapers and weekly advertising circulars.
  • Data entry (temp agencies can also be good sources for these jobs).

You will likely find that whatever job you get, as you become more familiar with it and the people around you, it will feel more and more like your "turf" and you will feel less and less anxious. Good luck!

It depends on what kinds of things make you anxious. Spiders Talking to someone? Tasks that need to be done quickly? Being seen by a lot of people? Doing housework? Doing tasks that involve thinking a lot? Something that involves numbers? Writing?

Without knowing exactly what triggers your anxiety, I think stepping out of your comfort zone MAY be a good idea, but it may not. I had a lot of anxiety growing up, and I dedicated myself to office work, like writing, answering phones, etc. I was adapted to it by temperament because I am logical and detail-oriented. Maybe that's what you should do - figure

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It depends on what kinds of things make you anxious. Spiders Talking to someone? Tasks that need to be done quickly? Being seen by a lot of people? Doing housework? Doing tasks that involve thinking a lot? Something that involves numbers? Writing?

Without knowing exactly what triggers your anxiety, I think stepping out of your comfort zone MAY be a good idea, but it may not. I had a lot of anxiety growing up, and I dedicated myself to office work, like writing, answering phones, etc. I was adapted to it by temperament because I am logical and detail-oriented. Maybe that's what you should do: find out what kind of mind you have and get a job that takes advantage of that. It is not an easy task, I know.

If you feel a lot of anxiety talking to people you don't know, maybe you should apply for a cook job or food preparation job, rather than working at the cash register at a fast food restaurant. If you like working with computers but don't know how to code or have advanced skills like that, consider working in an office where you can do word processing and other low-level computer tasks.

The more you think about what bothers you the most and what your skills and temperament are, the more precise you can be when choosing a job. Consider stepping out of your comfort zone, but don't beat yourself up if those kinds of things don't work for you at this point in your life. It is not always possible to "resist" and overcome a mental illness such as severe anxiety. Sometimes it works better to work with him rather than fight him. Later, when you feel more confident and have a job that doesn't trigger your anxiety all the time, maybe you can get some therapy or other treatment to really deal with the anxiety itself.

Another thing to know is that sometimes these things require trial and error. You may have to try a few jobs before you find one that doesn't increase your anxiety too much. Or consider volunteering at various locations, if you haven't already. Volunteering can help you figure out what you like and what you don't like. Good luck for you.

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