What are some effective strategies for negotiating a salary for a new job offer in 2020?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Camila Maddox



What are some effective strategies for negotiating a salary for a new job offer in 2020?

The ways to negotiate salary in 2019 are the same for 2020, or any other year for that matter. It's not complicated. So there you are; The recruiter has told you that they have completed the interview process and the company has selected you for the job. The recruiter reviews the terms of the offer with you, including salary. You hear that number and your stomach sinks. You realize that after 4 weeks of interviewing with this company you never thought of asking for salary. That is your first big mistake. If the position pays a salary that it cannot afford to take, then it has wasted t

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The ways to negotiate salary in 2019 are the same for 2020, or any other year for that matter. It's not complicated. So there you are; The recruiter has told you that they have completed the interview process and the company has selected you for the job. The recruiter reviews the terms of the offer with you, including salary. You hear that number and your stomach sinks. You realize that after 4 weeks of interviewing with this company you never thought of asking for salary. That is your first big mistake. If the position pays a salary that you can't afford to accept, then you've wasted a lot of people's time, including yourself. Be sure to ask about compensation sometime during the first part of the interview process. It goes like this: Recruiter: “So, Miss Job Candidate, Any questions before we finish your interview? You yes, could you give me an idea of ​​the compensation for the position? "Let's say you did and now it's been weeks and you got the job offer, but the salary is fine, you are waiting for more. The best way to approach it is to talk and ask. First thank the recruiter. Then make it clear how happy you are. is if you have been selected. Then simply ask the recruiter if there is an opportunity to discuss salary. Note that there may not be. The company budgets every year and its biggest expense, by far, is people But it never hurts to ask. If you don't like the number the recruiter offered you, you'd better have a number that you do like. Be prepared to provide the number you want and explain why your skills are worth that number. The salary you were offered may be competitive in your job market. But if you need more, you should be able to justify the reason. You may have worked your last job for 10 years, so you've likely earned raises over the years. But that doesn't always translate to your next job. So, tell the recruiter what you want. Ask them if they might consider it. If the company can do it and they want you, they should consider it. They may meet you halfway. You have to decide how flexible you are. I can only speak for myself, but most companies will at least consider it. If they can't do it, they'll tell you. Look at it this way Both parties have just spent a lot of time here identifying the right person for the job and no one wants to waste it and start over. It usually boils down to "I can or can't" because the company won't "do it or won't." At this stage, I usually don't see a lot of play. It is what it is. Either the company has the budget or it doesn't. In my company, when a candidate counters my offer, I will take it to the team and give my recommendation. I'm usually willing to give up a few thousand dollars of salary spread over a year if it means not looking for another candidate to hire. However, if the candidate's request is too much or undeserved / reasonable based on their abilities, I am willing to let that candidate go. Just step in reasonably and maturely and be prepared for whatever response you get. In my company, when a candidate counters my offer, I will take it to the team and give my recommendation. I'm usually willing to give up a few thousand dollars of salary spread over a year if it means not looking for another candidate to hire. However, if the candidate's request is too much or undeserved / reasonable based on their abilities, I am willing to let that candidate go. Just step in reasonably and maturely and be prepared for whatever response you get. In my company, when a candidate counters my offer, I will take it to the team and give my recommendation. In general, I'm willing to give up a few thousand dollars of salary spread over a year if it means not looking for another candidate to hire. However, if the candidate's request is too much or undeserved / reasonable based on their abilities, I am willing to let that candidate go. Just step in reasonably and maturely and be prepared for whatever response you get.

It depends on your industry, experience, and demand for your services. As it does not give any details, I can only offer general suggestions. You must address these questions beforehand.

What value do you bring to work?

What is your experience?

What is your salary history?

What is the value of the benefits package from work? That is part of your salary.

And some points to consider:

Do not negotiate salary until you receive a job offer.

Make sure the person interviewing you has the authority to make an offer.

Ask questions, don't make demands.

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