What are some common mistakes recent graduates make on their first job?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Joseph Lowe



What are some common mistakes recent graduates make on their first job?

My first job was in the field of design after graduating in mechanical engineering. It was a medium-scale industry. My work was totally mechanical.

  • Not being very friendly with Microsoft Excel and Outlook created a difficult scenario for a week. It's not like I know other design software but I don't know these basics.
  • Continuous feedback from all departments related to the project was a must. Sometimes people are lazy. If you are a project manager, then it is totally your failure if the project is not completed within the specified period. Ex. If any work-related materials are missing, also
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My first job was in the field of design after graduating in mechanical engineering. It was a medium-scale industry. My work was totally mechanical.

  • Not being very friendly with Microsoft Excel and Outlook created a difficult scenario for a week. It's not like I know other design software but I don't know these basics.
  • Continuous feedback from all departments related to the project was a must. Sometimes people are lazy. If you are a project manager, then it is totally your failure if the project is not completed within the specified period. Ex. If any work-related materials are missing, it is also your responsibility together with the purchasing department.
  • As a designer and head of manufacturing, I have to plan the activities for the next two days. Workers should not be idle. Some processes are not possible within the company, so I have to manage them from outside to within time without compromising cost and quality.
  • Always ask your boss for permission for what you want to do. Always give your boss continuous feedback. Use your phones wisely.
  • Please read the customer requirements carefully. Get all inputs clearly. Wait for the missing entries.

1. I remember there was a 100% argon gas requirement and we used a 98% blend in welding for the ONGC project, which was unacceptable.

2. Steel has many grades. We mistakenly bought another expensive grade 316 because we were unfamiliar with shopping. As a designer, if you don't provide an adequate description of the product to the purchasing department, be prepared to face rejection and therefore project delay.

3. Check whether the finishing tool has iron content or not. Iron leads to corrosion. Little things matter a lot.

  • If you want any changes to be made on your part, get the customer's written permission by mail and then continue.
  • Know your duties and responsibilities well. Say no to other additional jobs.
  • Communicate with your workers. Give them your time. Take care of your safety too.

They start to expect a lot too soon.
They must realize that things like a big car, a big house, etc. They come with time, effort, and practical experience.
Also, success in college life does not determine success in jobs. Anyone can do it right. We should not judge others as well as ourselves on the basis of our past achievements and failures. Just do your best wherever you are. I think that's what it takes.

New managers are destined to be wrong. Everybody does it, so get used to the idea. What really matters is whether you respond gracefully and humbly, quickly formulate and implement a recovery plan, and learn from your mistakes - things not everyone does.

However, some mistakes are bigger than others, especially during the critical first 90 days, when all eyes are on you. If you can avoid these traps, you will be way ahead of the pack.

10 common mistakes

1. Do instead of manage.

Although there is nothing wrong with rolling up your sleeves from time to time to help your team achieve pressure

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New managers are destined to be wrong. Everybody does it, so get used to the idea. What really matters is whether you respond gracefully and humbly, quickly formulate and implement a recovery plan, and learn from your mistakes - things not everyone does.

However, some mistakes are bigger than others, especially during the critical first 90 days, when all eyes are on you. If you can avoid these traps, you will be way ahead of the pack.

10 common mistakes

1. Do instead of manage.

While there is nothing wrong with rolling up your sleeves every now and then to help your team achieve an urgent goal, you are now being paid to direct and supervise the work of others, not to do it yourself. So don't keep doing what made you successful as an individual contributor. Instead, focus on helping others do their jobs well.

2. Excessive commitment.

It's natural to want to please others, establish credibility, and cause a stir when you first become a manager. And it's important to get some early wins under your belt. But note those victories carefully. Try to get comfortable saying, "I don't know yet, but I'll get back to you." Promising too much too soon will backfire and erode your credibility.

3. Failure to manage and communicate in all directions.

Your direct reports are your highest priority. True or false? Fake! They are very important, but don't make the fatal mistake of forgetting about your new boss and fellow managers. You need to manage and communicate both up and down, not to mention sideways, so your team isn't left alone.

4. Change things that are best left alone.

You finally have the chance to do things your way. He can't wait to make big changes and show how good he is in this whole managerial thing. Not so fast! Just because something seems like a good idea from where you sat as an individual contributor, or just because something worked at your previous company, doesn't mean it's the right approach. You don't want to make a big change, only to find, a few months later, that something was done the original way for good reason.

5. Trust your new power to get the job done.

Expecting good results simply because you are a manager and people are supposed to listen to you may seem like it works at first. But those results will be built on a foundation of resentment and fear, rather than goodwill and trust.

Does that mean you have to be soft on people? No. Set high expectations. But take the time to ask about the concerns and questions of others. Show that you are listening by actively welcoming alternative ideas and even dissent, and then integrating that feedback into your plans. And explain why you would like people to do things when you delegate, rather than just assigning tasks and barking orders. You don't want to be the managerial equivalent of a parent who says, "Do it because I told you to."

6. Badmouthing the previous manager.

Regardless of whether you are filling in for someone great or terrible, keep your opinions of that person to yourself. Blaming people is just unprofessional and you don't want to send the message to your team that you're okay.

Also, what if an important colleague, superior, or direct report really liked the previous manager? What if the person is still with the company and their comments reach them? Dragging another person through the mud tends to make the skidder as dirty as, if not more so, the draggee.

7. Align yourself from the beginning with any person or group.

Don't assume you understand the politics of your new situation, even if you were promoted from within. Doing so could cause you to prematurely align yourself with the wrong person or group. This is one of the reasons why it is critical to spend the first few weeks getting to know your key stakeholders and their relative political position in the organization.

Who has been successful selling their ideas? Who has not done it? Who has the most influence on important issues like budgets? Once you know the answers to these questions, you can position yourself accordingly.

8. Fall prey to "analysis paralysis".

Some new managers are overwhelmed by all the options and information coming their way, and they just freeze.

This can be fatal. Take a week or two to get to know the terrain and then decide on a course of action. Better to stick with something that is 80 percent of the way than to spend precious time coming up with the "perfect" plan.

9. Act like one more member of the gang.

Don't pretend that the new power dynamic that comes with your job doesn't exist. It does. While you may still have a great relationship with your team, you should put fairness before fraternization.

Don't go to lunch with the same team every day (if you want company, invite all of your team members). Don't borrow money from employees. If you socialize with direct reports outside of work, don't discuss it with other people, who might feel marginalized and wonder if it will hurt them in their performance appraisals. If you give Christmas gifts to employees, make sure everyone receives one and that they are all the same. You get the idea! You are now the manager. Act as one.

10. Unknowingly repeating one of the bad behaviors of your previous managers.

We tend to unconsciously do what we have seen of others. It is a natural reaction; When something goes wrong, we tend to think about our experiences and draw on our memories of things we've seen before. If you had a good manager, no problem. But many of us have had bad managers (whether we realize it or not). Let's say your former boss used public humiliation to keep people at bay, or he never had one-on-one encounters with you. You can begin to replicate those behaviors, rather than forging a healthier path.

Get a mentor, read a lot on the topic of management (you're off to a good start reading this article!), And practice, practice, and practice.

How could you screw him like a king on the first day at your new job? I mean, if you really want to get creative, that list could be endless. But in my experience, there is one great thing that new hires do constantly and it's a surefire way to lose favor with your new boss and colleagues, or even to get fired: act perfect.

Let me explain. Nobody is perfect. We all know. We don't expect it, and you won't fool anyone if you try. I know you want to make a big impression on day one, prove your competence, and start contributing amazing work right away, but there is a process that we hope you will continue.

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How could you screw him like a king on the first day at your new job? I mean, if you really want to get creative, that list could be endless. But in my experience, there is one great thing that new hires do constantly and it's a surefire way to lose favor with your new boss and colleagues, or even to get fired: act perfect.

Let me explain. Nobody is perfect. We all know. We don't expect it, and you won't fool anyone if you try. I know you want to make a big impression on day one, prove your competence, and start contributing amazing work right away, but there is a process we hope you will go through before we can trust you to do so 100%. You will need to acclimatize, observe the environment, feel the vibration, and snap into place. Nobody falls into the mold starting with the perfect shape for him, you know? It takes a little movement and wiggle to get the right fit; flexibility is the key. That means you listen, ask questions, and are honest when you don't know or understand something.

Your superiors are there to train you and make sure you can do everything they expect of your position, but if you are not honest about your weaknesses, how will they know how to help you? The biggest failures due to acting too confidently early on happen a few months down the line, when all the little pieces you didn't know how to handle and the under-the-rug sweepstakes start to suck. You told everyone you handled it so they left you to your own devices. But now your work is riddled with mistakes, late or missing. If you had said something from the beginning, there would be time to make corrections or provide assistance, but it is too late and you are ruining budgets and deadlines, making excuses and dodging the inevitable. Pretending that you are perfect catches up with you quickly,

Keep in mind that each position has the potential to further your career by exposing you to new angles, new problems, and new jobs. Be receptive to adjusting your perspective and be open to admitting that you don't know everything and you will learn much more. Again, be flexible, be malleable. Be imperfect.

As a side note, imperfection does not mean that you will be a drag on your teammates, but be sure to pay close attention to avoid wasting your time. Spend most of your initial efforts listening as you edit your questions by priority. If you're pushing, speak up. But if it's something you could figure out on your own, trust yourself, try doing some research, and then ask for confirmation. Because hey, too many lazy questions is almost as bad as no question.

So if you have the right balance of confidence and humility, great! You will be well on your way. On top of that, here are some more bad habits that you should definitely avoid:

  • Bad time management. This means arriving late, having a long lunch, or leaving early. It also means getting stuck on a task when your plate is full. Employers take a hit on new hires until they're fully acclimatized. Your job is to achieve total efficiency as quickly as possible. Take advantage of your time and be effective.
  • Foul-mouthed. Don't complain about your last job, your previous boss, or your former coworkers! Nobody knows you yet and maybe you are a great person who was treated badly, but if this is the first impression you are making, you will look like a complainer and gossip. You are also likely to lose people's trust - your new colleagues will assume that you will complain about them behind their back as well. Stay positive and try not to compare your new workplace to your old one. Seriously, nobody cares how horrible your last job was.
  • Inappropriate dress or cleanliness. This should go without saying, but you wouldn't believe part of the great physical neglect and choices I've seen. People who were perfectly professional during her interview appeared dirty and in such provocative clothing on the first day that she had to send them home right away. Have some respect for yourself and don't be that person. Dress for work, whatever it is.
  • Lawsuits and rights. When the first day arrives, you have to trust that everything you will need to do the work expected of you will be available or provided to you in good time. While you may be used to a particular environment or benefit from an earlier position, don't make the mistake of expecting all of those same comforts right out of the box. I've seen new hires come in and demand expensive new equipment on their first day that none of the other members of the company had. I've also seen people obsess over PTO and vacation time while training them; your priorities say it all. If there is something you really need that is essential to get your job done, then mention it. Otherwise, delay your demands until you can have a professional conversation about why those items are important not only to you, but to the team as well. Don't ask for special treatment. Be a team player and be reasonable.

Just remember that you will have plenty of time to shine and grow in your new position. But on your first day? Get the most out of the onboarding and acclimatization process while you are available and timely - listen, observe, ask smart questions, and be respectful and polite. You have as much to learn about your new environment as they have to learn about you. The best thing to do is flex and find the right balance.

This is not specifically for software engineers, but I think this applies to the many young applicants who enter their first company.

  • Falling in love more with the company than with work: probably one of the biggest mistakes I made. I really believed that if I got into the company I wanted, eventually I would find the right position for me. What was most painful was that I gave up an incredible role in a different company because I liked the brand of my then employer.
  • Believing that my manager had the whole answer and always gave me the right guidance - one of the most difficult and disappointing
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This is not specifically for software engineers, but I think this applies to the many young applicants who enter their first company.

  • Falling in love more with the company than with work: probably one of the biggest mistakes I made. I really believed that if I got into the company I wanted, eventually I would find the right position for me. What was most painful was that I gave up an incredible role in a different company because I liked the brand of my then employer.
  • Believing that my manager had the whole answer and always gave me the right guidance - one of the most difficult and disappointing lessons I had to learn, but which I soon realized was the most valuable. He had a manager that he really trusted and believed in. Everything she told me, I believed was canonical and infallible. It turned out that she was clueless like I did and had a concern for emotional abuse when things got hectic or too hot to handle.
  • Believing that having a black and white point of view on business execution was the right way to go - this was actually a problem, I hope it is no longer, for many of the Korean companies at the time. They try to indoctrinate the recent graduate into believing that his competitor is "the enemy" or even portray him as "evil" in an irrational mantra. I'm sure it was to gain loyalty in the short term, but many people I know got into a bad habit of spending too much time emotionally "hating" their rivals and not thinking enough about the big picture.
  • Believing I'd start doing "cool stuff" on the first day of my job - This was a fun time in my life as I thought I could take over the world and make the company's income chart hit a hockey stick vector to break my neck. I soon realized that I had few applicable skills and that I really had to learn to plan, prioritize, and execute. Every step was like pulling a tooth, but hey, I'm here, right?

It all depends on what you mean by the most important of the race.

It was undoubtedly the most exciting since one had managed to obtain the first full-time job and the beginning of his career after years of study.

You could start applying what you learned in college.

You would earn an income that would allow you to buy a car and get a bank loan for a house.

It could be important, as you would be accumulating valuable work experience to choose a future career.

It could be important because it could uncover your strengths and weaknesses in your career.

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It all depends on what you mean by the most important of the race.

It was undoubtedly the most exciting since one had managed to obtain the first full-time job and the beginning of his career after years of study.

You could start applying what you learned in college.

You would earn an income that would allow you to buy a car and get a bank loan for a house.

It could be important, as you would be accumulating valuable work experience to choose a future career.

It could be important because it could uncover your strengths and weaknesses in your career.

Personally, the first job was a stepping stone to bigger things in the future. I think this would be the case for ambitious people. They would want to work hard to move up in the career or pursue another career.

Personally, I was determined to explore opportunities for further study and business involvement. It wasn't easy as these commitments meant sacrifices: working too hard, giving up weekend rest and recreation, and traveling for the longest vacations. It meant the need to save the income earned in the first job to allow one to pursue future career opportunities.

The first job provided income security to explore other career opportunities. By taking advantage of these opportunities and a determination to work hard, one was able to climb the economic ladder and move on to an even more rewarding catering service. Personally, I gained a lot of business experience, and in this, I also discovered my passion for service quality management and one more opportunity to earn postgraduate research degrees, which gave me the credentials to teach and research in service management at University. Clearly, then, it was the first race that was the springboard for me to pursue other races later.

So this happened with one of the candidates I was interviewing. During the interview session, I asked her how good a team player you are, she said, she is a very good team player.

I asked him a few more questions and this is what came out.

Are you a party person or a quiet book reader?

To which she replied, I am neither.

Which is fine, we don't all fall into one of the two categories, but then he added more, I have no friends.

I was surprised, I asked her why, she said, I don't trust anyone but my family. I asked him: Why don't you have friends? She said, I had a best friend, but we are no longer fr

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So this happened with one of the candidates I was interviewing. During the interview session, I asked her how good a team player you are, she said, she is a very good team player.

I asked him a few more questions and this is what came out.

Are you a party person or a quiet book reader?

To which she replied, I am neither.

Which is fine, we don't all fall into one of the two categories, but then he added more, I have no friends.

I was surprised, I asked her why, she said, I don't trust anyone but my family. I asked him: Why don't you have friends? She said, I had a best friend, but we're not friends anymore, it broke my trust.

It was heartbreaking to hear this. I felt like I needed help but reminded myself that I am not a friend here and that there is a lot I can do as an interviewer.

My team has a very good team bond. We share our successes and failures, sadness and happiness. I would never want to hire a person who cannot get along with other team members. Someone who cannot trust others will not be able to earn their trust. Her response was a huge disappointment to me and even though she had a matching skill set, I was unable to hire her.

As a candidate you need to understand, it's not about giving the right answer, it's about having the right attitude.

In such a situation, you don't need to work on your answer. You need to work on yourself.

Here are some other things to keep in mind.

  • Go to an interview without knowing the company. Looking unsuspecting is the last thing you want as a first impression. It doesn't really matter if you are a new or experienced person, you should visit the company's website properly before going for an interview.
  • Bad response to "tell me about yourself." You must prepare yourself for an introduction to God. Who are you, what do you do, what do you like, what are your hobbies, what are your achievements, what are you working on, what skills you already have, you should introspect and prepare a better introduction. It will give the interviewer an idea of ​​whether or not you are a good fit for the position.
  • Poor CV. Most of the time, people don't highlight project accomplishments and things worth talking about on their resume. Always remember that your CV is going to give you your first impression. You must be very hot while doing it. And once you have the content ready, do a Google search to find a good resume format and format your resume well.
  • Have nothing to say. The interviewer only knows you through your CV, you need to give an answer so that the interviewer can ask you more questions and get to know you better to make a decision. If you only answer yes or no or with short sentences, it will not help the interviewer or you.

I wish you luck.

Take a job.

Sure, maybe not fllippng pancakes, but get a job.

As an employer, you are much more likely to want to hire you if you show that you had the ability to get up and go to work. He may need you right away, but by showing you have the guts, I'd be happy to wait for your notification period.

Just tell your employer in the interview that "I can't be bothered with sitting on my back, playing with my thumbs, so I took the" x "job."

Mind you, then you have to follow suit in your new job!

It is always more difficult to get the job you might want in your field when you are working.

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Take a job.

Sure, maybe not fllippng pancakes, but get a job.

As an employer, you are much more likely to want to hire you if you show that you had the ability to get up and go to work. He may need you right away, but by showing you have the guts, I'd be happy to wait for your notification period.

Just tell your employer in the interview that "I can't be bothered with sitting on my back, playing with my thumbs, so I took the" x "job."

Mind you, then you have to follow suit in your new job!

It is always more difficult to get the job you might want in your field when you are working in something else. So my suggestion is that you send your CV to all companies (addressed to the manager by name, which is pretty easy to find these days), in addition to looking at job postings.

You can do something completely different from your intended career, as an example, working in a winery (as an intern), during the harvest (February to May, southern hemisphere or August to November, northern). They pay you a pittance in the US, they pay you pretty well in Australia and New Zealand, you get nothing in Spain and they pay you very well in Germany, more or less in France (depending on both if it's a big winery commercial or a family winery). )

It's hard work, 12-hour shifts, seven days a week, but of course this means you don't have time to spend your salary, so it's a good reserve.

Call it a "gap year" or "doing some OE."

The biggest mistake any newbie should avoid is the expectation of getting down to business with the "fun" stuff from day one.

Get ready to do the things that no one else wanted to do.

It's not a bad thing either!

Doing shitty work really sets you up to work on the best things because you have a better understanding of what you're doing.

Another mistake to avoid is thinking that someone will teach you everything.

Your coworkers are definitely there to help and support you, but they can teach you everything about your job.

Be prepared to stay on Google and solve the problem

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The biggest mistake any newbie should avoid is the expectation of getting down to business with the "fun" stuff from day one.

Get ready to do the things that no one else wanted to do.

It's not a bad thing either!

Doing shitty work really sets you up to work on the best things because you have a better understanding of what you're doing.

Another mistake to avoid is thinking that someone will teach you everything.

Your coworkers are definitely there to help and support you, but they can teach you everything about your job.

Be prepared to stay on Google and troubleshoot for a while.

On the other hand, don't isolate yourself.

Sitting at your desk and saying the bare minimum to your coworkers is only okay for a while.

These are the people you will need to help you, so you need to get to know them.

Plus, talking to your coworkers will bring you up to speed on the company and its weaknesses very quickly.

I can tell that, especially in a new job, I am going to make a LOT of mistakes. It is natural to make mistakes. Nobody starts a new job perfect, it just happens. This is how you learn. He used to punish me when I made mistakes, especially if I made the same mistake a couple of times. It made me feel like I wasn't good enough and couldn't get the job done. But when you make mistakes, take the opportunity to learn from them. Learn to avoid the mistake and recognize why you make it, especially if it keeps happening. Don't be afraid to ask for help and advice. Over time the r

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I can tell that, especially in a new job, I am going to make a LOT of mistakes. It is natural to make mistakes. Nobody starts a new job perfect, it just happens. This is how you learn. He used to punish me when I made mistakes, especially if I made the same mistake a couple of times. It made me feel like I wasn't good enough and couldn't get the job done. But when you make mistakes, take the opportunity to learn from them. Learn to avoid the mistake and recognize why you make it, especially if it keeps happening. Don't be afraid to ask for help and advice. Over time, the right path will only come naturally, and before you know it, you will be helping others who are making mistakes that you once did.

The biggest mistake concerns your resume. Recent graduates often work while earning their degree, but the type of job is usually a service job, such as being a cashier. That's important, and it tells employers that the candidate is determined to earn a degree while making a living, but the specifics are not. Recent graduates are looking for entry-level jobs in a chosen career, and unless working as a Starbucks barista or camp counselor fits that career, it's on the resume as a parenthetical comment.

So what belongs on the resume of a recent college graduate? Projects they worked on and

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The biggest mistake concerns your resume. Recent graduates often work while earning their degree, but the type of job is usually a service job, such as being a cashier. That's important, and it tells employers that the candidate is determined to earn a degree while making a living, but the specifics are not. Recent graduates are looking for entry-level jobs in a chosen career, and unless working as a Starbucks barista or camp counselor fits that career, it's on the resume as a parenthetical comment.

So what belongs on the resume of a recent college graduate? Projects they worked on and their results. The articles they researched and the conclusions they wrote about. Internships for the lucky ones who had that opportunity.

And lose the .edu email. You are now an adult.

I would suggest 1) only looking for employment in the immediate area without looking for national / international job opportunities and especially at a distance. 2) Seeking short-term financial gain (high salary) versus gaining experience that will take you further. 3) Wasting too much time on a "JOB". Get in there, do a great job, get the experience, and move on to next. 4) Not taking the time to travel before getting stuck in serious work.

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