What are LinkedIn products?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Charles John



What are LinkedIn products?

There are 10 top LinkedIn products:

  1. LinkedIn (basic / free)
  2. LinkedIn Business Premium (subscription version # 1)
  3. LinkedIn Sales Navigator (subscription focused on sales professionals)
  4. LinkedIn Recruiter (subscription focused on talent acquisition professionals
  5. LinkedIn Recruiter Lite (subscription less expensive version of # 4)
  6. LinkedIn Premium Career (subscription to the least expensive version of # 2)
  7. LinkedIn Slideshare (PPT and PDF sharing app)
  8. LinkedIn Elevate (enterprise subscription to share and measure content)
  9. LinkedIn Ads (PPC advertising app)
  10. LinkedIn Jobs (fee-based job posting)

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There are 10 top LinkedIn products:

  1. LinkedIn (basic / free)
  2. LinkedIn Business Premium (subscription version # 1)
  3. LinkedIn Sales Navigator (subscription focused on sales professionals)
  4. LinkedIn Recruiter (subscription focused on talent acquisition professionals
  5. LinkedIn Recruiter Lite (subscription less expensive version of # 4)
  6. LinkedIn Premium Career (subscription to the least expensive version of # 2)
  7. LinkedIn Slideshare (PPT and PDF sharing app)
  8. LinkedIn Elevate (enterprise subscription to share and measure content)
  9. LinkedIn Ads (PPC advertising app)
  10. LinkedIn Jobs (fee-based job posting)

Visit my Quora profile to find out more about me.

Thanks for the A2A

Teddy Burriss
Coach and LinkedIn Trainer

  • LinkedIn (basic / free)
  • LinkedIn Business Premium (subscription version # 1)
  • LinkedIn Sales Navigator (subscription focused on sales professionals)
  • LinkedIn Recruiter (subscription focused on talent acquisition professionals.

Since you haven't said anything about yourself personally, I'll speak generally in the hope that this will benefit more people in the Quora community.

LinkedIn is very useful if you want to use it as a resource for finding work in your industry. If you set up your profile correctly, it is better than most "job search" websites. First, LinkedIn caters to headhunters and hiring managers, and makes it easy for them to find desirable candidates, so if you post the information that makes their search easy, they'll find you. Second, a properly constructed profile will be the equivalent

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Since you haven't said anything about yourself personally, I'll speak generally in the hope that this will benefit more people in the Quora community.

LinkedIn is very useful if you want to use it as a resource for finding work in your industry. If you set up your profile correctly, it is better than most "job search" websites. First, LinkedIn caters to headhunters and hiring managers, and makes it easy for them to find desirable candidates, so if you post the information that makes their search easy, they'll find you. Second, a properly constructed profile will be the equivalent of posting your resume, references, letters of recommendation, and a cover letter in which you can point out your strengths and what makes you special.

Now to have the kind of profile that will help you find a new and better job, there are a number of things you can do, which will require you to invest at least 2 hours a week in your career:

1. Actually, you must have the background and experience that makes you desirable. You can put lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig.

2. Don't burden your network with family and friends who are not relevant to your industry. If you are a Facebook person, use Facebook for that.

Speaking of Facebook, remember that LinkedIn is your PROFESSIONAL network and not a place to post personal or trivial things.

3. You should include people in your network who have actually worked with you AND who are willing to write a recommendation (not just clicking a "endorsement", that will happen quite often because LinkedIn pushes people to endorse everyone who know). Kindly ASK for recommendations - don't think people will automatically write you one.

4. You must join 2 types of groups: groups that include your industry AND groups that include headhunters in your industry.

5. Spend 10 minutes every business day inviting headhunters in your industry to join your network. Accept invitations from them and SEEK invitations from them. Do this consistently, at least an hour a week while you're already working, and you'll build a substantial network of headhunters. When someone connects with you, add their name, company, phone, email, and other contact details to your address book. If you have a Gmail account, you can keep it in your address book.

Stay in touch with scouts regularly, and if they do contact you with an opportunity that is not entirely suitable for you, offer to recommend a referral if possible. This is an investment that will ultimately pay off and is the equivalent of saving money for a rainy day. Starting this from scratch when you don't have a job is much more difficult because it takes longer before it pays off.

6. Once a week, take at least 15 minutes to add people you work with and who you used to work with. This includes colleagues, customers, suppliers, and people from what I will call "partner companies" who have worked with you. Look at the profiles of the people in your network for people you might want to network with.

The questions to always ask yourself when deciding to add someone to your network are: "Can this person be of use to me at some point?" And "while I may be asked to help this person, will it be a two-way street or will you always ask me questions?" Similar questions you would ask when deciding whether someone would be a valued friend.

7. Spend 10 minutes each work day staying in touch with your network: Adding 300 people to your network that you never make regular contact with is unproductive. Go through your network and add a tag / category to the ones that meet the criteria I mentioned above, tag them with the appropriate categories in your address book, and systematically go through the list by sending an email per business day with something short, interesting, and useful. . It is a 10 minute investment and will mean that 250 people from your network will be contacted at least once a year.

8. Once a month, post a short comment (2-3 paragraphs) on a topic relevant to your industry and link it to an article that encourages comment. Yes, this will also encourage you to read and stay up to date on what is going on in your field, which can only help you. Your comment should reinforce your credibility and expertise in the eyes of the reader.

LinkedIn will allow you to publish your comments in groups to which you belong and for people in your network. This is one of the reasons to join groups that scouts in your field are members of. This will earn you followers, expand your network and greatly improve your profile, IF your comments are well written and demonstrate your expertise.

Avoid flames or anything that could create enemies, and never reveal company secrets or gossip. Please follow corporate policies regarding social media and include a statement that opinions in your comment reflect your personal knowledge and opinion and not that of your company, unless you are a self-employed person. Remember that friends come and go but enemies pile up.

9. If you haven't recently, invest in yourself with a professional resume writer who also works with LinkedIn profiles. Similarly, contact at least one headhunter you feel comfortable with, get feedback on your resume, and make any necessary adjustments. LinkedIn will allow you to personalize the URL of your profile with your name. Do this and include your LinkedIn profile URL in the top section of your resume.

10. If you have your own website and it is relevant to your industry, link to it from your profile and link from the website to your profile. Posting on LinkedIn to draw attention to relevant and interesting articles on your own website can be very effective, but don't overdo it and make sure you only do it for the most timely and interesting articles.

11. DO NOT hand over your personal email contact list to LinkedIn, in the hope that LinkedIn will add them to its network. It will annoy people who shouldn't have been invited, and sometimes LinkedIn will ask people too many times.

12. LinkedIn makes suggestions that will improve the visibility of your profile. Follow the ones that make sense to you. Consider including a professional-quality headshot on your profile if you're comfortable doing so.

If you implement even half of the suggestions above, you will find LinkedIn to be a useful tool for advancing your career.

Good luck!

When I started looking for work about 6 months ago, I realized that I had not been looking for work in 13 years.

My entire career had been developed through networking, the old school "I know this guy" kind of thing.

Since my days in England in 2006, where I worked menial jobs in the * ehem * pleasant environment of Middlesbrough, I found all my jobs through abstentions or friends.

"But again friend, why the hell did you come to Middlesbrough?"

I had a LinkedIn profile but it wasn't really up to date. I asked Google how to set it up to beat "the noise". I read a couple of blog posts that I found quite insig

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When I started looking for work about 6 months ago, I realized that I had not been looking for work in 13 years.

My entire career had been developed through networking, the old school "I know this guy" kind of thing.

Since my days in England in 2006, where I worked menial jobs in the * ehem * pleasant environment of Middlesbrough, I found all my jobs through abstentions or friends.

"But again friend, why the hell did you come to Middlesbrough?"

I had a LinkedIn profile but it wasn't really up to date. I asked Google how to set it up to beat "the noise". I read a couple of blog posts that I found quite revealing and with that knowledge I went to work on my rebrand.

Serial entrepreneur | CEO of V&X Partners | Advisor in 47 tips | NYT Bestseller Author | 12-time Kona Ironman winner | Father of 3. My mother is my hero, she inspired me to make the world a better place "

The results were amazing, all the recruiters started contacting me. I was surprised to see that I was getting messages from a couple of recruiter posts a week on LinkedIn, I'm the hottest thing on the market right?

Up to that point, the times I had sent CVs to a company, I had never received a single reply.

-Of course, please, leave your CV right here! We will contact you very soon.

Let alone be proactively contacted by them, that was crazy, what have I been doing without a LinkedIn profile all this time? Curse! LinkedIn even contacted me to go work for them in Dublin at their European headquarters! Xavi, can you believe it? From shit from Figueres to Dublin, you're a star!

-Come for Xavi, just like Barcelona but with better salaries!

LinkedIn is really helpful in job search terms because it puts the candidate center stage. It has changed the game substantially compared to other sites. Being a social network, its aim is to make a much better version of a CV, a dynamic CV that is not difficult to read and that all interested parties can search for.

I know, it depends on the industry.

My wife, who is an architect, hasn't even bothered to learn the name, Lingewhat ?? Xavi, be careful with these shady sites that you use ...

but anyway, soon everyone will be there.

CEO in the Vatican | International Speaker | I am also a banker

What happens is that on LinkedIn you have people actively searching for you (or the keywords you appear for), while the other sites depend on you submitting your CV over and over again.

Your market is a well-oiled machine, it serves both the job seeker and the recruiter. The other sites may have a deeper job board (Infojobs), or better search (Indeed) or niche offerings (angel.co), but LinkedIn has it all in increasing numbers (Network effect, anyone?).

I promise, this is not an ad disguised as content. I know LinkedIn has its problems, but do we have to start with your competitors' problems?

To this day, it is not even a competition. It is very useful and will be for the moment.

Not even Microsoft will screw it up.

-Hehe good Xavi, but nobody told you that now we are fine ...

LinkedIn's best product decisions are those that have established and reinforced its unique position as the world's leading professional network:

  • Create a rich and structured profile that is public by default. LinkedIn profiles have become the de facto professional landing pages for hundreds of millions of people around the world. As a result, LinkedIn has earned a great position on Google - searching for someone's name usually returns their LinkedIn profile at or near the top.
  • Push people to complete their profiles through guided editing and a profile completeness score. Reducing fr
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LinkedIn's best product decisions are those that have established and reinforced its unique position as the world's leading professional network:

  • Create a rich and structured profile that is public by default. LinkedIn profiles have become the de facto professional landing pages for hundreds of millions of people around the world. As a result, LinkedIn has earned a great position on Google - searching for someone's name usually returns their LinkedIn profile at or near the top.
  • Push people to complete their profiles through guided editing and a profile completeness score. By reducing friction and introducing gamification, LinkedIn enabled many of its members to complete their profiles and keep them up to date, thereby increasing the value of their profiles and the platform as a whole.
  • Monetization through recruiters looking for passive candidates. Most of LinkedIn's revenue comes from its talent solutions business, specifically from employers and recruiters looking for passive candidates. The vast majority of members can access all the features they want for free, while the few who pay for premium products are happy to avoid paying recruitment companies even more money. Everyone wins.

LinkedIn's worst product decisions have involved chasing short-term goals or vanity metrics at the expense of long-term value:

  • Using dark user experience patterns to drive growth. LinkedIn became famous for the volume of email it generated. Additionally, a significant fraction of that email came from a feature that makes it easy for users to accidentally invite everyone in their email address book. This growth hack might have generated favorable metrics in the short term, but it damaged LinkedIn's reputation in the long term and diluted the value of the connections that make up its professional network.
  • Over emphasizing the content. In its determination to drive daily engagement metrics, LinkedIn launched, and heavily promoted, a succession of content products to give users a reason to access the site every day. None of them were particularly successful in terms of driving daily engagement, and they undermined LinkedIn's value as a professional network by making it a Facebook or Twitter wannabe.
  • Guarantees. LinkedIn sponsorships could have been a game changer for the recruiting industry and even beyond. Unfortunately, LinkedIn released endorsements in a way that optimized for quantity rather than quality. Instead of becoming significant reputation signals, endorsements became a joke and even a nuisance. This missed opportunity may be the worst product decision in LinkedIn's history.

Despite its mistakes, LinkedIn has been incredibly successful as a platform. LinkedIn has become an indispensable tool for outgoing professionals, particularly those involved in recruiting. And the platform continues to evolve, with Microsoft's deep pockets now available to support long-term strategic investments. Hopefully LinkedIn will use that opportunity wisely.

Quoting Satya Nadella: “I wanted to share with you how I think about acquisitions in general. For starters, I consider whether an asset will expand our opportunity, specifically, will it expand our total addressable market? Is this asset driving secular use and technology trends? And does this asset align with our core business and our overall sense of purpose? "

Building on Satya's comment above, 5 reasons why I think this acquisition makes sense:

  1. Aligns with Microsoft's Vision: Microsoft's focus has been on the company with a vision of empowering every person and organization on the planet.
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Quoting Satya Nadella: “I wanted to share with you how I think about acquisitions in general. For starters, I consider whether an asset will expand our opportunity, specifically, will it expand our total addressable market? Is this asset driving secular use and technology trends? And does this asset align with our core business and our overall sense of purpose? "

Building on Satya's comment above, 5 reasons why I think this acquisition makes sense:

  1. Aligns with Microsoft Vision - Microsoft's focus has been on the business with the vision of empowering every person and organization on the planet to achieve more. Whereas the vision of LinkedIn is to create economic opportunities for everyone in this world.
  2. Market Synergies: With Microsoft targeting the cloud professional space and LinkedIn as a leading professional network, both are targeting the enterprise / professional space to a large extent. It will allow both companies to leverage each other's strengths.
  3. Opportunities for Product Integration: With the amount of data that LinkedIn owns (as of 2019, more than 600 million users and 30 million registered companies), there are many areas where integration would make sense both from the point of view of view of product improvement and monetization. For example, Satya Nadella mentioned a few in her internal memo to employees: new experiences like a LinkedIn newsfeed offering articles based on the project you're working on, and Office suggested an expert to connect with via LinkedIn to help you with a task you are trying to complete.
  4. Keeps Competition Out of Space: It also allows Microsoft to keep Google and FB out of the domain of the workplace.
  5. Access to a wealth of data - Data points such as where people work, their colleagues, their schoolmates, the skills people possess, and the skills they may want to learn are valuable and can give Microsoft a better understanding of Your clients.

Linkedin

Linkedin is one of the largest online professional networks in the world. It was founded on December 28, 2002 and launched on May 5, 2003. In my opinion, LinkedIn is the best platform to connect with students, professionals, CEOs ... etc. Linkedin fully encourages people to develop their skills and technology is a completely professional site that does not encourage the kind of movies. On Linkedin, we can connect people related to our profiles and many other profiles if necessary. In 2019 Linkedin rapid increases in the market. Linkedin also offers a premium version and a fr

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Linkedin

Linkedin is one of the largest online professional networks in the world. It was founded on December 28, 2002 and launched on May 5, 2003. In my opinion, LinkedIn is the best platform to connect with students, professionals, CEOs ... etc. Linkedin fully encourages people to develop their skills and technology is a completely professional site that does not encourage the kind of movies. On Linkedin, we can connect people related to our profiles and many other profiles if necessary. In 2019 Linkedin rapid increases in the market. Linkedin also offers a premium version and a free version for professional development. From LinkedIn, we can develop our business globally. There are many more things that we can find on LinkedIn.

benefits of creating a LinkedIn account?

  • Easily get job information
  • You can easily find freelance jobs
  • many CEO, CTO ... connections can be found
  • Join with important business connections
  • join professional groups
  • Updating a resume online is easier
  • Read news of your connections.
  • Show your knowledge

Many more things you can get from LinkedIn ……

So start creating a Linkedin account and develop your career professionally ...

User-13204606331189583070 mentioned Xing. They're pretty big - around 10 million members worldwide compared to 90 million on LinkedIn.

However, the current biggest competitor would have to be Viadeo. They have 35 million members, they are already quite large in Europe and now they are targeting the US market. They are about to open an office in SF - http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/03/06/BUFR1HTDBC.DTL&type=tech

I really don't think Facebook is a competitor. I think most people tend to use it to keep in touch with their friends. I know quite a few business connections of mine that

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User-13204606331189583070 mentioned Xing. They're pretty big - around 10 million members worldwide compared to 90 million on LinkedIn.

However, the current biggest competitor would have to be Viadeo. They have 35 million members, they are already quite large in Europe and now they are targeting the US market. They are about to open an office in SF - http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2011/03/06/BUFR1HTDBC.DTL&type=tech

I really don't think Facebook is a competitor. I think most people tend to use it to keep in touch with their friends. I know of quite a few business connections of mine that I am connected to on LinkedIn, but that would not be part of my network on Facebook. The only time Facebook could be used for a LinkedIn-like task is if you asked one of your friends or a friend of a friend for a recommendation or a contact on a particular job. Even then, I have never done that.

I think BranchOut will face an uphill battle trying to build a LinkedIn-like layer on top of Facebook. I heard a lot of complaints about spam wall posts; in fact, I blocked BranchOut updates from clogging my timeline.

Statistics suggest that the average time recruiters spend on any resume is 12-14 seconds while making a long list of suitable candidates. The next thing they do is visit an especially LI profile to verify it, as CVs can be customized to job specifications, but LinkedIn will be predominantly consistent.

Now to answer your question, if you are aggressively seeking job opportunities, it makes sense to have your presence on all career platforms. It gives the outside world an idea of ​​who you are beyond your CV. Recommendations, awards, skill sets that your colleagues have endorsed you for, and most importantly

Keep reading

Statistics suggest that the average time recruiters spend on any resume is 12-14 seconds while making a long list of suitable candidates. The next thing they do is visit an especially LI profile to verify it, as CVs can be customized to job specifications, but LinkedIn will be predominantly consistent.

Now to answer your question, if you are aggressively seeking job opportunities, it makes sense to have your presence on all career platforms. It gives the outside world an idea of ​​who you are beyond your CV. Recommendations, awards, skill sets that your colleagues have endorsed you for, and most importantly, a short summary that essentially doesn't need to be SHORT (because there's a limit to where you can complete your CV or it gets boring and in tune with it. rejection)

It's certainly not a deal breaker if you don't have an LI account, but for me and most recruiters, it's also a place where we find passive (not desperate) talent and reach out to them with some amazing opportunities :)

I hope that helps

It depends on what aspect of LinkedIn you are talking about.

Here are some examples:

Hiring: Monster (Product), Indeed (Job Search Portal)
Sales / Lead Generation: Salesforce.com (Product).
Publication: Medium (social networks).
Social networks / social networks: Facebook (company), Twitter (company)

Just a complete list, of companies or aspects. But you get the idea.

So while there may not be a company that competes head-to-head with LinkedIn across the board, I think LinkedIn has competition in every aspect of its offering. And this is good.

Hopefully ... this!

How Linkedin needs to get into the reputation game (and why)


Edit: I wrote this after the skill set piece was added for users to self-select, but before Linkedin started asking users to endorse others on specific skill sets.

TL; DR: Instead of a simple Yes / No mark on endorsements, it should be a rating scale. And the evaluator's own ratings (of the people who rated them) should influence the extent to which their ratings (for others) affect their score.

Products | LinkedIn press room

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