What ancillary industries will autonomous vehicles create?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Noemi Simon



What ancillary industries will autonomous vehicles create?

Let's replace "create" with "nurture", as many of these industries already exist in various forms:

  1. Workforce integration / SaaS applications. When a company's work calendars and salary data can be linked to each employee's transportation, there is a great opportunity to optimize employee efficiency, establish / modify policies, distribute / reorganize teams, and illuminate the impact on the city and civil services.
  2. Government policy. Reason similar to the previous one. We can also include here the boom in the surveillance / security / law enforcement technology sectors, as vehicles (and possibly infrastructure) will have a ton of
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Let's replace "create" with "nurture", as many of these industries already exist in various forms:

  1. Workforce integration / SaaS applications. When a company's work calendars and salary data can be linked to each employee's transportation, there is a great opportunity to optimize employee efficiency, establish / modify policies, distribute / reorganize teams, and illuminate the impact on the city and civil services.
  2. Government policy. Reason similar to the previous one. We can also include the boom in the surveillance / security / law enforcement technology sectors here as vehicles (and possibly infrastructure) will have a ton of data on people's locations, movements, and surrounding environments.
  3. Micro-distribution chains. The opportunity for a local Walmart or even pizzeria to inherit a fleet delivery infrastructure from the autonomous network could result in a new, locally-centric approach to sourcing, building, shipping, and distributing goods and services. And, of course, the accompanying logistics software, which could generate an auction market to buy wasted trips (zero occupants).
  4. Vehicle experience software / hardware / services. I guess we can't qualify this as an accessory, but to be clear, I'm not talking about the obvious in-car entertainment stuff. Mobile - Anything becomes an opportunity, like a coffee maker, an exercise bike (which could help power the vehicle and thus save you a few pennies on your commute, because why not?), And even equipment or software that make it easy to reading in a vehicle. easier for those of us who get motion sickness when trying to do it. Don't forget that in this field, you are now also targeting a market of consumers who were previously marginalized by their lack of a driver's license: children, the elderly and the disabled.
  5. Racing / off-road / enthusiast driving experiences. As we stop driving as a daily chore and traditional cars and mechanics become unnecessary, a market emerges in recreational driving that, until now, was unreasonable for anyone who was not a car nut and / or extremely wealthy. We will have parking lots, B-roads and many other areas that will become obsolete due to the autonomous traffic network, and a good part of those areas could be converted into sports facilities. Racing as a sport will become much more common as its relative cost as an informal weekend “thing to do” becomes more accessible and nostalgia for manual driving grows.

There are many more, but I don't want to hog them all ... eager to hear from other people (aside from the guy who mentioned an autonomous vehicle robbing an ATM, whatever that means).

5 Important Things Movies Teach Us About Self-Driving Cars: ...

I'm not sure there are any new industries, but we can expect a boom in:

A) litigation

B) maintenance

C) kidnapping

D) criminality

E) customization

F) land cruise

G) racing

H) etc.

After all, there is little novelty in a car that drives itself, those driven by a chauffeur are not that different.

It is not clear what happens when the first autonomous cars are sent to rob an ATM or something similar!

It depends on the level of autonomy. Until now, by autonomous driving we mean cars without a steering wheel, driverless cars that drive everywhere in all weather conditions. But it seems that this will not happen in the next 20 years.

These vehicles will require some form of human assistance, when necessary. But having a driver on board to provide that assistance does not offer the desired financial benefit. The alternative could be to have the option of remote driver assistance on demand. This telecare option has the scope to create new types of driving jobs - yes

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It depends on the level of autonomy. Until now, by autonomous driving we mean cars without a steering wheel, driverless cars that drive everywhere in all weather conditions. But it seems that this will not happen in the next 20 years.

These vehicles will require some form of human assistance, when necessary. But having a driver on board to provide that assistance does not offer the desired financial benefit. The alternative could be to have the option of remote driver assistance on demand. This telecare option has the scope to create new types of driving jobs, similar to NASA's space rover operation from Earth. As a result, vehicle driving jobs will be lost, but many remote driving jobs are likely to be created.

Due to the difference in wages and the availability of broadband connectivity anywhere in the world, most of those jobs will likely be created in developing countries like Bangladesh, India or Indonesia.

The importance of autonomous driving technology to non-auto industry companies, including Google, Uber, Baidu, Apple, Alibaba, and even Dyson, which plans to develop semi-automatic autopilot cars, can probably be summed up as follows:

  1. The high potential of the autonomous vehicle to offer an affordable portable home office / temporary on-demand office and even a living room in the future.
  2. The technology ecosystem surrounding the autonomous driving platform, e.g. cloud computing, Internet of things, voice-controlled smart digital speakers / assistants, virtual augmented reality, GPS navigation, e-commerce smart delivery, online
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The importance of autonomous driving technology to non-auto industry companies, including Google, Uber, Baidu, Apple, Alibaba, and even Dyson, which plans to develop semi-automatic autopilot cars, can probably be summed up as follows:

  1. The high potential of the autonomous vehicle to offer an affordable portable home office / temporary on-demand office and even a living room in the future.
  2. The technology ecosystem surrounding the autonomous driving platform, for example, cloud computing, Internet of things, voice-controlled intelligent digital speakers / assistants, virtual augmented reality, GPS navigation, smart e-commerce delivery, entertainment services of online streaming, smart glasses, smart watches and etc.
  3. As Alexa and Google Home become increasingly prominent, most of online search is now entered via voice commands and traditional desktop keyboard search and mobile device touchscreen search are eliminated. currently popular. Imagine in the future, the search will be done through your Google Glass or Smart Assistant in your self-driving cars.

    Google has been giving away the "free" Android operating system to the market to solidify its dominance in online advertising and the search engine business on mobile smart devices; in addition to paying expensive annual royalties to the Mozilla Foundation to make Google the default search engine in the Firefox browser. Google would definitely also want to become the default search engine on any autonomous driving platform.
  4. Autonomous driving technology is one of the best use cases to unleash the potential of AI (especially deep learning).
  5. To gain the benefit of being the first to act, allowing your implementations to become the de facto industry standard.

Google has likely lost the boat on the waves of social media and cloud computing technology in the 2000s and is still trying to catch up with Facebook and Amazon on these 2 tech ecosystems. Google would definitely like to cement its status as a leader on the autonomous driving technology front and be the first company to take advantage of the majority of the ROI from autonomous driving technology.

In fact, I had the opportunity to work on the Stanford DARPA Urban Challenge Car and attended a class with Sebastian Thrun. I don't know if the Google cars use the same techniques as the Stanford Urban Challenge car, but I guess they do, as Sebastian helps with that project.

Basically building an autonomous car comes down to 3 key tasks
1) Precise location
2) Obstacle detection
3) Route planning

I worked with the car components for (1) so I can talk more about that. The technique they use is called "Monte Carlo" localization and it is a well known technique. GPS + IMU to

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In fact, I had the opportunity to work on the Stanford DARPA Urban Challenge Car and attended a class with Sebastian Thrun. I don't know if the Google cars use the same techniques as the Stanford Urban Challenge car, but I guess they do, as Sebastian helps with that project.

Basically building an autonomous car comes down to 3 key tasks
1) Precise location
2) Obstacle detection
3) Route planning

I worked with the car components for (1) so I can talk more about that. The technique they use is called "Monte Carlo" localization and it is a well known technique. The GPS + IMU are quite accurate, but still below the accuracy needed to change lanes, etc. For this reason, laser sensors are used to improve accuracy. These laser sensors are used to create a 3D point cloud of the environment. In this scan, it is quite easy to remove the lane markers due to the fact that the lane markers produce a higher intensity value in the laser scan. These lane markers are combined with an RNDF (Route Network Definition File). All this is done in the probabilistic framework of the hidden Markov models:

In addition to lane detection, they also have the ability to perform full point cloud alignment. To do this, they first drive through a patch of road collecting point clouds from the surroundings over many successive frames. These point clouds are then algorithmically aligned (not sure how they do this, but I suppose an iterative closest point type algorithm could work). This creates a full 3D model of that road patch and you can then align the 3D model with satellite imagery. Now when they drive down that road again they can take the laser scan and align the scan with the existing 3D model to find an estimate of exactly where they are.

Another technique they used was combining camera data with laser scans to improve accuracy. One problem with lasers is that they become very scarce as you move away, and the returned signal is often noisy. So what they did was align the laser scan with an image from the camera and use it to better infer depth. (I don't know much about this)

The planning stage is also quite complex and from what I know they use not only traditional route planning algorithms (A *), but also some reinforcement learning.

You may want to refer to these documents for more information:
http://www.springerlink.com/index/r01240114858137n.pdf
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpls/abs_all.jsp?arnumber=1706831
http: // citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.48.3519&rep=rep1&type=pdf

Living near Seattle Washington makes sense to me in densely populated areas. Recently, an article claimed that 30 percent of all traffic in downtown Seattle was due to people driving around the block looking for parking.

Unfortunately, like most reports these days, they didn't explain how they got to that number, but I find myself driving in circles looking for a parking lot when I visit. After reading that article, I have been paying attention to this problem and I am not sure if 30 percent is accurate, but it is a significant part of the traffic.

Self-driving

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Living near Seattle Washington makes sense to me in densely populated areas. Recently, an article claimed that 30 percent of all traffic in downtown Seattle was due to people driving around the block looking for parking.

Unfortunately, like most reports these days, they didn't explain how they got to that number, but I find myself driving in circles looking for a parking lot when I visit. After reading that article, I have been paying attention to this problem and I am not sure if 30 percent is accurate, but it is a significant part of the traffic.

Self-driving cars would eliminate the need to park them. This would widen the lanes because it would not be necessary to park on the side of the road. The number of parking garages would not be necessary, and potentially some garages could be converted to low-income housing, solving another major problem for Seattle.

I realize that the question has not been answered regarding the impact on the auto industry. This could be a problem for automakers, their parts and repair shops. In theory, not as many vehicles would be needed if most people now essentially share cars.

I don't see autonomous cars taking over the world. I have a lot of classic cars that will never drive themselves and I don't want to stop driving them. It will take at least 2 or 3 generations to adopt this philosophy. Also don't forget about car enthusiasts. People love to drive. There is nothing like a road trip with your friends.

For now I imagine a park-and-ride type setting when entering a big city. You drive to a large lot, park your car, and hop on a train that takes you downtown, and then autonomous vehicles do the rest.

I try to stay away from political issues, but currently Seattle and King County have huge traffic problems. The government's plan is to invest $ 54 billion to offer more of the same modes of transportation. We could be looking back 10 years from now and kicking ourselves for tackling congestion with old technology. If self-driving cars work the way I suggested, what a waste of $ 54 billion. Nobody is actually talking about using them to solve this problem, unfortunately.

Do you know what OCR is? OCR stands for Optical Character Recognition, which is a technology used in flatbed scanners. So you can put a newspaper page in the scanner, scan it and get a text file written in Word.

The last time I noticed it, I read about OCR software that claimed to be able to read 97% of all characters correctly. This sounds impressive, but a 97% recognition rate means that 3% are not recognized correctly - 3 out of 100 is a wrong character every 33 characters.

This text is (not including this line) 504 characters (including whitespace). So a 3 percent error m

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Do you know what OCR is? OCR stands for Optical Character Recognition, which is a technology used in flatbed scanners. So you can put a newspaper page in the scanner, scan it and get a text file written in Word.

The last time I noticed it, I read about OCR software that claimed to be able to read 97% of all characters correctly. This sounds impressive, but a 97% recognition rate means that 3% are not recognized correctly - 3 out of 100 is a wrong character every 33 characters.

This text is (not including this line) 504 characters (including whitespace). So a 3 percent margin of error means 15.3 spurious characters in these lousy seven lines of text.

It might be worth wondering if it's easier to just retype the text instead of putting the page through the scanner, scanning it, and running it through the OCR program, and then looking for the wrong 15 characters. As long as you don't have to process payments, one or two wrong characters might not bother anyone, but if each miss can kill someone, things get complicated.

Most of the autonomous vehicles I've seen so far were either kept indoors or permanently controlled by humans, or were not allowed to run faster than 10 mph. Because 97% is not enough. Even 99% is not enough.

And there's another point: People who overestimate the capabilities of autonomous vehicles today often underestimate the abilities of humans. I read a statistic the other day that said the probability of being involved in a serious car accident is once every 30 years. If we think that people start driving at 15 and stop driving at 80, this means two accidents in life. Since there are many people who have already had more than two accidents, there are also a large number of drivers who will never be involved in a serious car accident in their entire lives. If we take a closer look at car accidents and what makes them happen, we often see a small number of reasons for it: driving under the influence, texting with smartphones, lack of sleep. If we can fix these problems, then we could dramatically increase the level of safety for human drivers. And autonomous cars will have a hard time reaching that level.

So, you will get two types of answers to this question.

Response type number one will be written, mostly by older men, with a blue-collar background. God bless you, I am very close to being one of them, but I digress. You can read tired crap about "sensors" and "electronic dads" and "space age fancy stuff."

The second type of answer comes from people who see self-driving cars as the MASSIVE innovation that changes the economy that they are. Not only will they be cheaper, but they will completely revolutionize cities and entire economies. How?

Electric and autonomous cars will have

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So, you will get two types of answers to this question.

Response type number one will be written, mostly by older men, with a blue-collar background. God bless you, I am very close to being one of them, but I digress. You can read tired crap about "sensors" and "electronic dads" and "space age fancy stuff."

The second type of answer comes from people who see self-driving cars as the MASSIVE innovation that changes the economy that they are. Not only will they be cheaper, but they will completely revolutionize cities and entire economies. How?

Self-driving electric cars will have NO maintenance costs,
well maybe not zero, but very close. There will be no powertrain. There is no oil to be changed. No motor filters. No transmission fluid. The brakes hardly need to be touched as they use regenerative engine braking for most of their stopping power.

A Tesla has fewer than 100 moving parts, and four of those parts are the doors. Stop and think about that for a second… I bet among all the knobs, buttons, handles and pulleys that there are 100 moving parts in the cabin of a typical Hyundai today.

Self-driving cars are
going to be MUCH safer. 90 percent of the public, when surveyed, believe they are a "better than average" driver. Statistically we know that this is impossible.

When cars communicate with each other, there will be no accidents caused by unsafe lane changes. Zero accidents due to running a red light. Zero drunk driving accidents. Zero accidents due to crossing the middle line. Zero car accidents entering traffic.

That level of security will create economic efficiencies ... and one of the most important will come from dramatically cheaper car insurance.

The most expensive part of a car is what is behind the wheel.
When you remove the most fragile, most expensive, and least safe component, everything gets better. What is that component? The idiot at the wheel.

Insurance rates will go down. Accidents will decrease.

Cities Will Change Shape
Your city tax bill is about to go through a massive makeover. After all, major cities will have massive amounts of unused real estate. With the perfect automation of the car, the traffic will disappear. After all, massive efficiency leads to far less traffic jams, indecision, and road rage. With traffic flowing well, we no longer have the need for massive roads.

We will no longer need parking spaces in the city center - workers can drop off workers while the autonomous car drives off to do something else during the day.

All of these municipal efficiencies mean massive shifts in a city's spending priorities.

And finally, all those sensors are going down in price, exponentially.
Anyone who claims that the technology is "expensive" is frankly unaware of the alternatives. Stop and think about the first home PCs. Enough computer power to power about 1% of today's iPad, for the low and low cost of about $ 20,000 in today's dollars.

There's a reason you can buy 4-year-old iPads for 10 cents on the dollar. The raw materials to create that level of computing power are simply much cheaper. Chips are getting more and more powerful every week, so a perfectly good iPad can be created for pennies on the dollar.

It is no different with automotive technology. Imagine a 10-year-old Chevy sitting in a museum, next to a 10-year-old cell phone. Both are in perfect condition and must be considered "new". That cell phone can be made for a mere fraction of its newer cousin ... that car will cost about the same.

Self-driving cars are the way of the future. It is an exciting time.

The autonomous driving feature in cars will definitely take over. However, cars WITHOUT a manual override option are way ahead.

Imagine the following scenarios:

  • It is Friday at 6:00 pm and he is leaving the office. You arrive at the door of the office building and the car awaits you with the doors open. His wife is already there and his children are in his wife's car right behind. You walk in, the windows darken, you open the TV screen attached to the ceiling and choose the Netflix title of your choice. The seat turns into a bed and you go to sleep. The car alarm rings and the blinds
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The autonomous driving feature in cars will definitely take over. However, cars WITHOUT a manual override option are way ahead.

Imagine the following scenarios:

  • It is Friday at 6:00 pm and he is leaving the office. You arrive at the door of the office building and the car awaits you with the doors open. His wife is already there and his children are in his wife's car right behind. You walk in, the windows darken, you open the TV screen attached to the ceiling and choose the Netflix title of your choice. The seat turns into a bed and you go to sleep. The car alarm goes off and the blinds slowly open. You watch the ocean waves hit the shore and thank God for the invention of the autonomous car.
  • You're going to have a few drinks after work. You drink too much. You grab your phone and yell "Siri, get me!" The car comes to the pub door, you jump into the back seat and pass out only to have the car wake you up in your garage in the morning.
  • Your teenage son returns from a party at 4 a.m. M. Schedule your car for pick-up at 3:50 a.m. M. At 4:30 a. M., The car calls to tell you that your children have come home safely with pictures of them getting out of the car.
  • You arrive at a restaurant. The valet is charging $ 10 for mistreating your ride and changing the settings of the driver's seat and mirrors. You just jump out of the car and it goes to find a parking lot by itself. At the end of the meal, you look at your phone and see that the car is parked five minutes away. You call him while you pay the bill. When you are outside the restaurant, the car will be waiting for you with the doors open.
  • You buy a state-of-the-art autonomous electric RV and set it up for a month-long European tour. In the middle of a night trip, you decide that you want to play a video game with your children, or you want to see the view better from the right side of your window, or dinner is ready. You put it on autopilot and do your thing. While visiting the destination, the RV will look for an exit to charge itself for the next leg of the trip.

Wouldn't you like to have those features as an option? I know I would!

And that's only in personal car markets. If you count the millions of commercial controllers that could be replaced by technology, it really is a no-brainer.

Self-driving cars are amazing and, in my opinion, the way to go. A car that is driven alone is useful for all of the following people:

  • those who cannot drive; perhaps because they are minors, do not have a driver's license or are not human. Imagine sending your dog to the vet in the car. Bye, good luck with your check-up, see you tonight, Fido!
  • those who need things, but cannot go themselves; home with the flu and no cough syrup? Send the car to the pharmacy, pay electronically.
  • those who should not drive; We have zero tolerance for alcohol on the road here in Sweden, which means that if I want to have a
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Self-driving cars are amazing and, in my opinion, the way to go. A car that is driven alone is useful for all of the following people:

  • those who cannot drive; perhaps because they are minors, do not have a driver's license or are not human. Imagine sending your dog to the vet in the car. Bye, good luck with your check-up, see you tonight, Fido!
  • those who need things, but cannot go themselves; home with the flu and no cough syrup? Send the car to the pharmacy, pay electronically.
  • those who should not drive; We have zero tolerance for alcohol on the road here in Sweden, which means that if I want to go out at night in the city, I need to book a hotel room. If my car could drive home alone, I could be in the pub from time to time.
  • those who are better off not driving; my parents are getting older. I'd feel better knowing that your car could drive autonomously.
  • those who prefer not to drive; it's raining, it's 3 in the morning, you're tired and can't see anything. Better let the car take over.
  • those who are security conscious; Self-driving cars are much less likely to crash.
  • those who are under time pressure; I've driven from Canada to Mexico on more than one occasion, and even though we did it at the time, taking turns driving, I'd be happy to say to the car "KITT, take control for a while now, I'm going to get myself some Zzzs. Tell me when Let's get to Reno, I want to have breakfast at Wendy's. "
  • those who are too lazy to drive; "I want a happy meal, sweetie!" “All right, I'll send KITT to the Drive Thru again. So vegan, with extra BBQ sauce? See you, KITT!
  • those who need extra money; I really want my car to drive on an Uber contract while I'm at work. May I earn a little more! Why should it park all day and just cost money there?

Other than that, my wife would definitely benefit from an autonomous car.

You don't drive alone, but you have an immense need to go places. To make things even more troublesome, we live in a town half an hour from the next city. And for added flavor, her favorite spots are rural Loppises, Swedish second-hand markets that are generally based on farms.

These days almost all of the mileage we put on our car comes from weekend drives through landscapes like these:

... to get to places like these, where we load loot and drag it home:

Rocking chairs, cat climbing towers, 24-piece tea sets for when we have 24 people coming over for tea, as we do, of course, and stuffed eagles ... how sometimes I wish I could stay home with one. bottle of rum and leave it travel the universe in a car that knows the way home and will patiently go and wait in all these treasure barns.

My life could be much more like this, if we had an autonomous car:

How fast can they drive? Very fast.
How fast will they drive? Well, if it is possible for both autonomous vehicles and people on the same street or highway, it will not be faster than the posted speed limits. And if the street or highway is anywhere a human can be found walking, the speeds will not be faster than the current posted speeds. Not because the autonomous car can't go faster, but humans can't respond fast enough under those conditions.

If you are driving ONLY on a driverless highway, then speeds could be much higher as interactions between vehicles will be reduced.

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How fast can they drive? Very fast.
How fast will they drive? Well, if it is possible for both autonomous vehicles and people on the same street or highway, it will not be faster than the posted speed limits. And if the street or highway is anywhere a human can be found walking, the speeds will not be faster than the current posted speeds. Not because the autonomous car can't go faster, but humans can't respond fast enough under those conditions.

If you are driving ONLY on a driverless highway, then speeds could be much higher, as interactions between vehicles will be based on communication between vehicles, and they will always be able to avoid a collision. If your car slows down, the cars behind and next to you will slow down as well, and then all will pass you as there is room for them, even if other autonomous vehicles need to spread out to let them in.

Much of the improvement in driving time will not come from a faster top speed, but from the ability to make all vehicles travel together at the same speed, so that there are no traffic jams, by grouping cars that are slowed down by a slow traveling car, or any of the other dynamics that are the main cause of the slowdown in traffic. The space between the cars would also be less, as each car will tell all nearby cars what it is going to do.

Absolutely! In fact, Tesla and Lexus are coming out models that not only have adaptive braking and cruise control, these models have adaptive steering capabilities. These are the next steps to full automation. Most state transportation departments across the country have been incorporating road sensors to keep automated vehicles in their lanes and properly spaced. Many new vehicles are now drive-by-wire. Which means that the driver's inputs are first processed through a computer, and the computer decides how much turn or acceleration, braking, and room to do. If each vehicle

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Absolutely! In fact, Tesla and Lexus are coming out models that not only have adaptive braking and cruise control, these models have adaptive steering capabilities. These are the next steps to full automation. Most state transportation departments across the country have been incorporating road sensors to keep automated vehicles in their lanes and properly spaced. Many new vehicles are now drive-by-wire. Which means that the driver's inputs are first processed through a computer, and the computer decides how much turn or acceleration, braking, and room to do. If every vehicle were driven by cable, we would eliminate traffic jams and most accidents. They've already built and tested an automated tector-trailer in Colorado, from Ft. Collins to Colorado Springs last year. It was all a success. My tractor is drive-by-wire and has adaptive brake, cruise, and throttle controls. In fact, I can set the distance in seconds that I want to keep from the vehicle in front of me. Set the cruise control and my truck will maintain that distance at any speed. For example, if I set the cruise control to 55 mph on Interstate 270 (very busy, very, very, very congested), my truck will keep between 2.4 and 3.6 seconds of distance from the vehicle in front of me. Speed ​​doesn't matter. If traffic slows to 35 mph or even 10 mph, my truck will slow down and speed up like traffic does without any intervention from me, including sudden braking with a very strong red screen informing me of an imminent collision and taking away my braking control in the crucial first few seconds. He maintains control until I stop him and speed. Once two vehicles pulled up in front of me on a busy 85 freeway with less than 50 feet between us and I was at freeway speed (65 mph speed limit), I thought they and I were in big trouble and we were not going to reach our destinations. We were looking to end up in the hospital and maybe even the morgue. Before I could get the explanation out of my mouth, the tractor's computer took over and slowed enough to avoid a completely safe collision. His reaction is much faster and more controlled than a human can react. Fortunately, I had no cargo in my trailer, it was very light, and the left lane was open. But even heavy

It took me a long time to learn to trust drive-by-wire, but now I'm a total supporter of automation. Removing control from drivers in crucial seconds before an incident will save millions of lives from injuries and deaths. It will reduce insurance, damage and maintenance costs.

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