What advice can you give for a first day of work?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Jacob Reid



What advice can you give for a first day of work?

My first day of work was… Yesterday! Here's a preview of my experience, I'll try to keep it short and simple.

  1. Rest ! If you want to be mentally and physically prepared, you will need to get some rest before the big day. Go on vacation, travel, play sports, sleep a lot, make sure you don't get sick. Pleasure yourself. The next few weeks can be a bit more stressful, it is better to be in good condition to be effective.
  2. Smile! Okay, you are stressed, you will have to give up but what makes the first impression is the human contact. Smiling is an accepted method around the world to appear supportive. Why not use this? Your w
Keep reading

My first day of work was… Yesterday! Here's a preview of my experience, I'll try to keep it short and simple.

  1. Rest ! If you want to be mentally and physically prepared, you will need to get some rest before the big day. Go on vacation, travel, play sports, sleep a lot, make sure you don't get sick. Pleasure yourself. The next few weeks can be a bit more stressful, it is better to be in good condition to be effective.
  2. Smile! Okay, you are stressed, you will have to give up but what makes the first impression is the human contact. Smiling is an accepted method around the world to appear supportive. Why not use this? You will have many occasions to prove that you are an interpreter, start by convincing your new colleagues that you are a nice person.
  3. Set up! This is obvious, but still, it must be done. Call friends or LinkedIn contacts who work / have worked in your new company to find out exactly the typical day, the uses, the people, etc. The best way to prepare is to have insider information or experiences. Be prepared for the company, but also prepare for your position, your strategy. Imagine in two years: where do you want to be? And what is your strategy to achieve it?
  4. Network! You are new, the docs are great to learn, but a bit boring and not very specific. You will need to ask a lot of questions and get a lot of information in the near future. Your colleagues are your future friends. Even if it's not your habit (as it was for me), force yourself to step out of your comfort zone and meet as many humans as possible.
  5. Take note! The first day is also full of important information that you will need to keep close to you perhaps for the rest of your life. Write it down, save it. Do it methodically and make sure that you will always be able to find this specific information in the future.
  6. Be open-minded and ready to learn! The best way to adapt to a new company is to embrace change and learning opportunities. If you want to grow while making money ($$$), you better take advantage of any occasion when you have to learn.
  7. Be yourself (o_O) I think this is probably the biggest mistake new recruits could be making. While you are overly stressed, you may be tempted to go overboard, overdo it, or on the contrary - to be introverted as hell. Do not do that. Be yourself, trust yourself, dear to show the world who you are.

    Hope this helps some of you prepare for this special occasion :) Good luck and make the best of each day!

Ask questions.

Some people will tell you not to ask why things are done the way they are done too soon, as it seems presumptuous.

I do not agree.

Let's say you have experience working with people doing task X using method Y. You come in and see people doing task X using method Z, which takes twice as long, costs three times as much, and produces similar results.

I think it makes a lot of sense to ask “Why are you using the Z method? Why don't you use the Y method? "

And then you will learn more about the company. Perhaps there is a specific reason why the Y method would not work in the company.

Keep reading

Ask questions.

Some people will tell you not to ask why things are done the way they are done too soon, as it seems presumptuous.

I do not agree.

Let's say you have experience working with people doing task X using method Y. You come in and see people doing task X using method Z, which takes twice as long, costs three times as much, and produces similar results.

I think it makes a lot of sense to ask “Why are you using the Z method? Why don't you use the Y method? "

And then you will learn more about the company. Perhaps there is a specific reason why the Y method would not work in the company. Perhaps the slight gain in precision you get with the Z method is crucial at this endeavor. Perhaps it is only with the Z method that it maintains traceability. Or maybe there is some stupid reason, like no one is trained in method AND, or that executives don't want to pay for training in method AND, or even that no one knows that method AND exists.

Obviously, you should ask questions like this from the point of view of trying to figure out how the place works, not from the point of view of someone who is smarter than everyone else and who will revolutionize the place. Even if you are smarter than everyone else and they hire you to shake up the place, you still have to know why they are doing things the way they are.

In any case, you should know what is going on. It would be foolish for a new hire not to ask important questions like this just for political convenience.

This also applies to everything else you may have questions about. Obviously you want to avoid a situation where someone has budgeted 15 minutes with you and you have two hours of questions for them, but as a new hire you need to understand what your role is and how you fit in with the rest of the organization.

(I originally wrote this as a comment here: https://www.quora.com/Whats-something-on-an-employees-first-day-that-sets-off-red-flags/answer/Ronen-Shnidman/ comment / 72587851 But I decided this deserves to be its own answer).

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