What Accounting Blogs Should A CPA Read?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Lilah Foreman



What Accounting Blogs Should A CPA Read?

I would definitely recommend CPA Trendlines (www.cpatrendlines.com), Golden Practices (http://goldenmarketing.typepad.com), Going Concern (http://goingconcern.com/), Re: The Auditors (www.retheauditors.com) and anything else on this list (http://www.onlineaccountingdegree.net/features/accounting/).

I'm biased, of course, but I also think CPA Success (http: //www.cpasuccess) is pretty good too. :-)

All of Bill's suggestions are excellent. I especially like Going Concern because it goes beyond the usual accounting news. Here's my shameless plug: http://www.njscpa.org/examcram. That's our blog written by CPA candidates studying and taking the CPA exam.

Have you already considered following some accounting experts on the web? They usually share quality content on their social profiles.

Here's a list of the top 10 accounting experts on the web: http://www.getapp.com/blog/top-10-accounting-experts/

Thriveal blog, for entrepreneurial CPAs: http://THRIVEal.com

Here are a couple of good ones

  • Accounting onion
  • summarizing
  • Daily financial executives
  • Capterra Accounting
  • Financial information and law
  • Home - Accountex Report
  • OSYB Numeric Crunch! Accounting Tips Blog

CPA daily brings together a great summary of the main accounting news of the day. You can subscribe to their daily newsletter. I highly recommend it.

Here are two that not only blog but also have podcasts:


Http://www.thebeancounter.com http://www.thecpaguide.com

Well, you'd be better off getting an accounting major, possibly supplemented by a finance major (it just requires a few extra classes). To become a CPA, you will also need to earn a graduate degree in accounting, then you will need to pass the CPA exam ... so it takes a lot more than a class to become a CPA.

To get your feet wet and see if this is a potential career path for you, start with Accounting 101 (or whatever your college calls the introductory level course). You will learn the basics of accounting and the "language" of accounting. Most courses extend prerequisite courses, so

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Well, you'd be better off getting an accounting major, possibly supplemented by a finance major (it just requires a few extra classes). To become a CPA, you will also need to earn a graduate degree in accounting, then you will need to pass the CPA exam ... so it takes a lot more than a class to become a CPA.

To get your feet wet and see if this is a potential career path for you, start with Accounting 101 (or whatever your college calls the introductory level course). You will learn the basics of accounting and the "language" of accounting. Most courses extend the prerequisite courses, making it difficult to tell you exactly what to do next.

Trust me, I thought I wanted to be a CPA when I started taking business classes. My specialty was going to be accounting and I had good grades without having to study much ... until I took tax accounting. I struggled through this course and finished with my first college C grade. This course helped me realize that being an accountant was not what really interested me. I ended up switching to a dual major in Finance and Banking, and Accounting ended up being my major (I had already completed most of the accounting classes required to be considered a "minor").

Contrary to popular belief, accounting doesn't actually involve much math beyond basic algebra.

Hello there,

I am currently in my third exam (REG), and I have completed and passed FAR and BEC.

I think the first and foremost thing to do is find the right review / preparation course. You should go to youtube and try some of the review courses available and see which one suits you. I would recommend using Roger CPA to prepare for the exam, as it does a fantastic job of breaking down the material into small, digestible pieces. Before committing to Roger, I spent a ridiculous amount of money on all parts of the Becker review according to some CPA review websites that rate review courses. Halfway through FAR

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Hello there,

I am currently in my third exam (REG), and I have completed and passed FAR and BEC.

I think the first and foremost thing to do is find the right review / preparation course. You should go to youtube and try some of the review courses available and see which one suits you. I would recommend using Roger CPA to prepare for the exam, as it does a fantastic job of breaking down the material into small, digestible pieces. Before committing to Roger, I spent a ridiculous amount of money on all parts of the Becker review according to some CPA review websites that rate review courses. Halfway through FAR, I realized that I couldn't stay awake and process the material the way Becker presented it. The switch to Roger has made a huge difference in terms of learning the material effectively. I also tried Yaeger,

Once you've chosen your review course, set some realistic goals with your study program (Roger CPA comes with study planners for various time windows). You don't want to schedule the exam prematurely just because you want to take the exam, but you also don't want to drag it out for months and months. You will want to spend time every day learning (watching lectures / solving problems for the first time) and reviewing (repeating) FAR concepts. It's a lot of material to cover / retain, but don't obsess over a rule / concept if you're having trouble understanding it. Give each section your best shot and then move on according to your study plan. You will discover many things the second time.

I suggest that you do each MCQ at least twice and rewatch the lectures on topics that are more difficult to understand. Many other study methods depend on whether or not they work for you. For example, summarizing and writing notes by hand is essential for me, as it reinforces the concepts. If you are an auditory learner, you may want to invest in some audio review tapes or make some yourself to listen to on your commute to work or during downtime. The only common denominator to study is time. So unless you're an accounting god or ridiculously awesome examiner, be prepared to put in the time / effort.

Good luck for you!!

Certified Public Accountants are in demand in many industries. They can demand high salaries due to their experience in financing. Additionally, many companies retain the CPA's accounting talent by paying good salaries along with raises and bonuses.

According to the AICPA survey, a qualified CPA with less than one year of experience can earn around $ 66,000 per year.

In the United States, the average salary for an experienced CPA is $ 119,000. A person with 20 years of CPA experience could get an annual payment of more than $ 152,000. Plus, they can expect to earn 10% increments every year. T

Keep reading

Certified Public Accountants are in demand in many industries. They can demand high salaries due to their experience in financing. Additionally, many companies retain the CPA's accounting talent by paying good salaries along with raises and bonuses.

According to the AICPA survey, a qualified CPA with less than one year of experience can earn around $ 66,000 per year.

In the United States, the average salary for an experienced CPA is $ 119,000. A person with 20 years of CPA experience could get an annual payment of more than $ 152,000. Plus, they can expect to earn 10% increments every year. The number of years of experience and the industries in which they have worked determine the salary level of the CPA.

Typically, a CPA is involved in the following areas:

  • Activities related to tax returns, tax computations and tax payment.
  • Maintenance of financial records in the organization.
  • Ensure accounting regulations.

Let's get to know some of the common options for a CPA.

Corporate accounting:

The main task of a corporate accountant is to manage financial reports, analyze data, and ensure compliance. Also, the role involves forecasting and budgeting. In addition, public accountants are responsible for preparing reports to make decisions. With one year of experience, a financial analyst can earn an annual salary between $ 43,000 and $ 81,000. For CPAs, those with three years of experience, the salary will be more than $ 100,000 per year.

General accountants, cost accountants, and tax accountants can also earn salaries in almost the same range as mentioned above.

Public accounting:

As we know, public accounting firms provide accounting related services. On the contrary, the public accountants of these companies are usually involved in the preparation of tax returns, in the audit of the financial statements and in assisting in the preparation of the client's financial statements.

The big four public accounting firms are:

  • PwC - PricewaterhouseCoopers
  • Deloitte - Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu
  • KPMG - Klynveld Peat Marwick Goerdeler
  • EY - Ernst & Young

Thousands of employees work in these companies.

How much do they earn annually?

Employees of the big four accounting firms can earn a salary in the range of $ 45,000 to $ 60,000 a year.

Financial services:

There are a wealth of job opportunities for CPAs in the banking and financial services industry. An experienced CPA is highly valued in business loans, credit analysis, and risk management. In financial services, many companies hire qualified accountants to handle compliance and reporting functions.

You may ask the question "How much salary can a CPA earn in the finance industry?"

A CPA in the finance industry can expect an annual salary between $ 44,000 and $ 84,000. With more than five years of experience, a credit analyst can earn between $ 68,000 and $ 130,000.

If you can. But there are a few things to keep in mind:

  1. You must have completed a four-year degree course (which is common in the US) OR a three-year degree course and then a two-year graduate course to be eligible for enrollment as a student in the course of Certified Public Accountant (CPA). I believe that previously certain states in the US admitted students who had taken their 3-year degree course and were qualified as Certified Public Accountants, but now this exemption does not appear to be available. Please check.
  2. As far as I know, you can take the CPA exams only in
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If you can. But there are a few things to keep in mind:

  1. You must have completed a four-year degree course (which is common in the US) OR a three-year degree course and then a two-year graduate course to be eligible for enrollment as a student in the course of Certified Public Accountant (CPA). I believe that previously certain states in the US admitted students who had taken their 3-year degree course and were qualified as Certified Public Accountants, but now this exemption does not appear to be available. Please check.
  2. As far as I know you can take the CPA exams only in Dubai and some other countries including of course the US Canada has its own CPA course.
  3. The US CPA has its value in a few companies in India that have international operations, consulting companies, and those companies that have several subsidiaries or joint ventures abroad. Therefore, its scope is quite limited in India.

The best professional qualification, for a graduate in Commerce, in the shortest time possible, is the US CMA This is equivalent to the Indian CMA (ICAI - Institute of Cost Accountants of India). While the India CMA takes a minimum of 3-4 years to complete, the US CMA can be completed in 6-9 months. Cost wise, it is also quite affordable and the start-up costs would be between INR 60,000 and INR 70,000. In terms of job prospects, it is as good as the Indian CMA, if not better. You need a minimum of 2 years of work experience in the Finance and Accounts department of a company to enroll as a Member of the Institute of Management Accountants in the US Once you become a member, you can add the letters 'ACMA' after your name.

You can get the US CMA even if you have a full time job in India. There are examination centers in most cities in India.

If you take the US CMA exams outside of India, you will be eligible to apply for ICAI (Indian CMA) membership.

I suggest you fill in your final CA. There's nothing like "I can't afford to fail again." Give yourself another 3 years. Find a full-time job if you can and take at least one week off (two weeks if possible) before exams. This is more than enough. In my more than 40 years of corporate experience, I have come across many Chartered Accountants who graduated in their twenties and thirties and are doing quite well now.

Take coaching for subjects in which you are not doing well. Try previous question papers in exam conditions. This is the key to success.

God bless you and good luck!

To take the CPA exam, a candidate must meet the following requirements:

Be 18 years old; of good moral character; a graduate of an accredited college or university with a bachelor's or master's degree that includes a concentration in accounting; and all candidates must have a social security number.

Each applicant must provide the Board with a final official transcript that clearly indicates that the applicant has earned a bachelor's or master's degree with a specialization in accounting and the date the degree was awarded. A concentration in accounting means a minimum of 39 semester hours in business.

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To take the CPA exam, a candidate must meet the following requirements:

Be 18 years old; of good moral character; a graduate of an accredited college or university with a bachelor's or master's degree that includes a concentration in accounting; and all candidates must have a social security number.

Each applicant must provide the Board with a final official transcript that clearly indicates that the applicant has earned a bachelor's or master's degree with a specialization in accounting and the date the degree was awarded. A concentration in accounting means a minimum of 39 semester hours in business-related subjects, of which at least 27 semester hours consist of accounting courses.

Accounting course means that the subject matter contained in the course description or catalog issued by a college or university includes auditing, taxes, accounting standards, principles, or processes. Business-related subjects means courses that contain in the prefix or course title an indication that the subject of the course is one of the following: business, finance, marketing, management, economics, computing, statistics, or accounting.

A transcript from a postsecondary educational institution located outside of the United States must be certified by the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) or an accrediting agency that is a member of the National Association for Credential Evaluation Services, Inc. ( NACES).

A Certified Public Accountant (CPA) supports corporations, organizations, or individuals with planning for tax and financial returns. Tasks performed by public accountants include studying financial records, preparing tax forms, and supervising audits. A CPA too

  • Maintains and organizes digital and physical financial records.
  • Evaluate all business transactions and prepare accurate reports on findings.
  • Coordinates income tax research and planning with employees.
  • Conduct regular audits to ensure accuracy of financial, expense, and savings records.
  • Organize and file federal, state, and local income taxes.
Keep reading

A Certified Public Accountant (CPA) supports corporations, organizations, or individuals with planning for tax and financial returns. Tasks performed by public accountants include studying financial records, preparing tax forms, and supervising audits. A CPA too

  • Maintains and organizes digital and physical financial records.
  • Evaluate all business transactions and prepare accurate reports on findings.
  • Coordinates income tax research and planning with employees.
  • Conduct regular audits to ensure accuracy of financial, expense, and savings records.
  • Organize and file federal, state, and local income tax documents.
  • Contributes to budgeting procedures.
  • Periodically informs management about the financial situation of the company and recommends solutions to improve results.
  • Develops and implements effective accounting policies and processes.
  • Ensures clients stay up-to-date on industry changes and changes in regulations.
  • Responds to accounting and tax related questions.
  • CPA job description

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