Was Steve Jobs right: Google / Android stole / copied aspects of iOS?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Aaron Willis



Was Steve Jobs right: Google / Android stole / copied aspects of iOS?

Answer this:

  1. Which of those operating systems came first?
  2. What company introduced Push, Sync, embedded mail, etc. on mobiles?
  3. Which operating system continues to bring important features to the mobile landscape?
  4. Which OS is more secure at the moment (meaning if the other one is getting better, it is actually following the first)?


You may get your answer!

Anyone who follows the smartphone and tablet market knows that Android has become the number one mobile operating system in the world. They also know that, before his death in 2011, Steve Jobs was not very happy with Google's mobile operating system. In fact, he made quite a bold threat when he spoke of his dislike for this competing mobile operating system.

"I will spend my last breath if necessary, and I will spend every penny of Apple's $ 40 billion in the bank, to correct this problem. I am going to destroy Android, because it is a stolen product. I am willing to go to a thermonuclear war in this ", the late C

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Anyone who follows the smartphone and tablet market knows that Android has become the number one mobile operating system in the world. They also know that, before his death in 2011, Steve Jobs was not very happy with Google's mobile operating system. In fact, he made quite a bold threat when he spoke of his dislike for this competing mobile operating system.

"I will spend my last breath if necessary, and I will spend every penny of Apple's $ 40 billion in the bank, to correct this problem. I am going to destroy Android, because it is a stolen product. I am willing to go to a thermonuclear war on this. "said the late CEO.

When Apple was working on its iPhone strategy, which included what is now iOS, Google's CEO was Eric Schmidt and he was on Apple's board. That means you were probably on top of Apple's iPhone strategy and roadmap at the same time that Android was in its infancy. Two years before the iPhone was launched, Google acquired Android Inc. from Andy Rubin, which would eventually become the Android mobile operating system.

That is what we know. But there are some questions that, to this day, I still can't get a solid answer from anyone involved in this topic.

1. The moment Eric Schmidt realized that Google had what would be an operating system that would compete with iOS, why didn't he resign from Apple's board?

2. Did you tell Steve Jobs and the board that Google had a smartphone operating system in the works? If so, were you recused when the board discussed the iPhone and its operating system?

3. I, and many people in the industry, knew that Rubin was creating a mobile operating system. Once Google bought Android, Inc., did Apple ask Eric Schmidt about this, and if so, did he tell you that it would compete with Apple's mobile operating system?

4. Once Apple learned that Google had a competing operating system, why did it have to wait until 2009 for Schmidt to resign from Apple's board?

While these questions still linger in my mind and may never be answered, the bottom line is that Google created Android while Schmidt was in the Apple directory. And from Steve Jobs's tirade or threat, it seems clear that he felt it was stolen from Apple during this time period.

Apple also went after Google and Android through patents it bought through the "Rockstar" consortium, a joint venture owned by five major tech companies. Rockstar outbid Google in 2011 auctions to acquire Nortel's massive patent portfolio for $ 4.5 billion. Apple contributed $ 2.6 billion of that total, and Microsoft, Cisco and others contributed the balance.

What is significant about this patent portfolio is that it included significant intellectual property around Wi-Fi networks and cellular connectivity, among many other areas related to mobile technology. Rockstar proceeded to sue Google and other OEMs like Samsung and HTC last year.

Two weeks ago the news came that Google had resolved this patent fight with Rockstar. Although we do not know the dollar amount of the settlement, it appears that Apple will get at least some compensation for Google's "theft" of the IP of its mobile operating system. However, I doubt the deal comes close to covering Apple's share of the $ 2.6 billion it invested in the Rockstar consortium. I'm not sure what Steve Jobs would think of this "solution" to his thermonuclear threat, but Apple is now under new management and it appears that Tim Cook and his team are being more realistic about the Android challenge. Instead, Apple is trying to thwart its growth, especially in high-end smartphones,

While I think Apple is still very frustrated by what happened during Schmidt's time on their board and the eventual impact Android had on the growth of Apple's mobile operating system, I think Cook and Apple have accepted the role of Android. on the market and have realized that they have to live with this fact. Whatever compensation you get from the Rockstar / Google deal, and whatever money you ultimately raise by winning the Samsung suit, it will now be your only consolation on this matter. Android is here to stay, and Apple now has to try to win by innovating its own mobile devices and operating system in the future.

I hope you have found it useful ...

Source: Why did Steve Jobs go 'thermonuclear' on Android?

Imagine being a co-founder and CEO of Apple who, just over a decade earlier, had returned with his baby just at the point where he was almost on the brink of bankruptcy. But it somehow managed to get Apple back to profitability. So Apple somehow overcomes the devastation that was the dot-com crash because, as you said at your developer conference in 2000, Apple innovated to get out.

At the end of 2005, things were going well enough that, just 8 years after Apple almost went bankrupt, it is necessary to take a chance and effectively recreate the mobile phone.

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Imagine being a co-founder and CEO of Apple who, just over a decade earlier, had returned with his baby just at the point where he was almost on the brink of bankruptcy. But it somehow managed to get Apple back to profitability. So Apple somehow overcomes the devastation that was the dot-com crash because, as you said at your developer conference in 2000, Apple innovated to get out.

At the end of 2005, things were going well enough that, just 8 years after Apple almost went bankrupt, it is necessary to take a chance and effectively recreate the mobile phone. In January 2007, he introduced himself to an audience and created possibly the biggest sensation in the tech industry since the personal computer by introducing Apple's obviously innovative new product, the iPhone. For 2009, it's clear that the product that you and Apple's designers, engineers, and programmers created more or less from scratch is going to be huge.

Then you find out that Google, a company with which you have a close enough relationship that its CEO, Eric Schmidt, has been on Apple's board since 2006 and therefore was aware of the development of the iPhone, is copying the Iphone. He discovers that Google, Apple's board member company, quietly went out and bought a mobile operating system created in part by one of its former employees. And Google also came out and got mobile phone makers, who had been building junk before the iPhone, to sign up to use their new mobile operating system. Unlike its talented folks at Apple, who had to figure out the entire user interface and user experience of the iPhone from scratch, Google pretty much just copies its appearance.

This is simply theft. And it happened through an act of betrayal of trust. This is why Steve Jobs was so upset.

DISCLAIMER: I've never worked for Apple, so I wasn't in the middle of any of this. What I know comes from Steve Jobs' biographer and I trust Steve Job's version of events.

Android:

  • Promotes expandable storage, allowing you to upgrade your storage capacity as high as you like with fairly inexpensive MicroSD cards
  • Promote an open developer atmosphere. If you are a developer, it is free to learn, code, and publish apps on Android.
  • It has widgets, which give you information from within the applications without having to open them. Think about it: every application that you open daily has its information displayed on its home screen (or other screens).
  • It has better notifications. Android was the first to have a "notification center" concept. It is very likely that any update that an iOS user receives was in Android fo
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Android:

  • Promotes expandable storage, allowing you to upgrade your storage capacity as high as you like with fairly inexpensive MicroSD cards
  • Promote an open developer atmosphere. If you are a developer, it is free to learn, code, and publish apps on Android.
  • It has widgets, which give you information from within the applications without having to open them. Think about it: every application that you open daily has its information displayed on its home screen (or other screens).
  • It has better notifications. Android was the first to have a "notification center" concept. It is very likely that any update that an iOS user receives has been on Android for months and months.
  • It has bigger screens. If you like the 4 "screen of the iPhone, you can choose a" compact "Android phone with the same screen size, or you can choose a larger size that fits your hand.
  • It has NFC. You can pay for things by touching a reader with your phone. You can send anything you want to another Android phone just by attaching the back of the phones and tapping the screen. It is quite magical.
  • It has Google Now. Siri (sort of) gives you answers when you ask for them. Google Now gives you answers before you ask for them. (Yes really.)
  • It has tactile feedback. Some people don't like it, but others love it. The option is there if you want it.
  • Allows you to choose default applications. If I want to use Chrome, I can make all the links open in Chrome. If I want to use Safari, I can make all the links open in Safari.
  • Allows you to choose a different keyboard. Swype is a popular option (tracing from letter to letter without lifting your finger), but there are some great keyboards for different uses.
  • It allows you to attach anything to emails. The new iOS 6 mail on the iPhone 5 achieved this (with previous versions not allowing any attachments), but it only allows you to attach images and videos. No documents, no powerpoints, no zippers, nothing useful to get things done.
  • I could take panoramic photos for quite some time before Panorama mode was touted as a "new feature" on the iPhone 5. This is typical.
  • It does not limit the applications of the "competition". Example: Chrome (or any other browser) on iOS cannot use the Safari engine, so the "Apple" application is always the "fastest". Competition and options are good, hmm?
  • Supports multiple app stores. You can download apps from Google Play Store, Amazon Kindle app store, or other app stores you want.
  • It is used in most telephones. This means you can pay as much as you want to get the exact screen size, processor, look, or other specs you want.
  • It is tightly integrated with the Google ecosystem. You can log into the services with your Google account just by hitting Accept when prompted.
  • It has standardized cables. The same cable to charge my camera can charge my phone. The same cable to charge my phone can charge my friend's phone (different model).
  • You can have a theme to look exactly like iOS.
  • Google Hangouts shakes off the FaceTime socks.
  • It has Google Maps.
  • Angry Birds is free.


'Nuff said.

Well, technically, Android is based on Java and Linux. Its user interface is a copy of IOS ... Technically it is a copy of the IOS of apples that emulate blackberries. You can see examples of how it looked a lot like Blackberry until Steve Job's iPhone keynote in 2007. The creator of Android freely admits that they had to go in an entirely new direction for the iPhone. This is why Android runs slower in Java and will always be slower. Or design-wise, this design copy continues, this continues to this day, just look at when IOS chose the flatter design, 6 months later Android adopted the flatter look even though Google didn't.

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Well, technically, Android is based on Java and Linux. Its user interface is a copy of IOS ... Technically it is a copy of the IOS of apples that emulate blackberries. You can see examples of how it looked a lot like Blackberry until Steve Job's iPhone keynote in 2007. The creator of Android freely admits that they had to go in an entirely new direction for the iPhone. This is why Android runs slower in Java and will always be slower. Or design-wise, this design copy continues, this continues to this day, just look when IOS adopted the flatter design, 6 months later Android adopted the flatter look, although Google didn't realize it was because Apple was designing a clock operating system. Google is a big ad sales company, but you have no idea when there is no Apple to copy; look at the failure of Google glasses, without Apple glasses and a picture to copy.

Yes, they certainly did.

iOS was planned with an important new idea: phones needed to be more secure and reliable than personal computers (Windows or Mac). And the heart of that insecurity was the ability of applications to modify the system and interfere with the actions of other applications. This modifiability is the basis for most of the malware problems and the increasing "wear and tear" that we see on PCs after a few years of use.

So, iOS was designed with a fundamentally different approach. The apps were in a testing area. They couldn't modify the system. Do not interfere with each other. (and the binaries had to b

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Yes, they certainly did.

iOS was planned with an important new idea: phones needed to be more secure and reliable than personal computers (Windows or Mac). And the heart of that insecurity was the ability of applications to modify the system and interfere with the actions of other applications. This modifiability is the basis for most of the malware problems and the increasing "wear and tear" that we see on PCs after a few years of use.

So, iOS was designed with a fundamentally different approach. The apps were in a testing area. They couldn't modify the system. Do not interfere with each other. (and the binaries had to be signed by Apple first)

This echoes the intent of the original Macintosh, which was originally intended to be an application-like computer. Capable of running applications, but not free for everyone. The Mac ended up being a much more general purpose.

Android didn't follow this path, partly out of a desire to get to market as quickly as possible. And in part because they saw those PC-like capabilities as providing flexibility and customization.

The original intention was for a relatively modest Linux kernel, running a proprietary form of the Java stack for applications. That decision meant that the phone's operating system could be put together very quickly.

But the price of that rush is still being felt. Partly in terms of the weak security of the device. And, in part, the performance issues that are part of the Java memory model.

Since using Android at Samsung in the past and switching to Apple, I think it's the best decision I've ever made. After about 2 years of using my Samsung Galaxy S6 it started to slow down day by day, the screen had also burned out so I was able to partly see some of my most used apps in the background and generally the apps not they worked very well. . When switching to an iPhone 7, I instantly noticed the difference in how the phone works much faster and smoothly, the apps work brilliantly, and everything seems to be interconnected very well. I have a pair of AirPods and these co

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Since using Android at Samsung in the past and switching to Apple, I think it's the best decision I've ever made. After about 2 years of using my Samsung Galaxy S6 it started to slow down day by day, the screen had also burned out so I was able to partly see some of my most used apps in the background and generally the apps not they worked very well. . When switching to an iPhone 7, I instantly noticed the difference in how the phone works much faster and smoothly, the apps work brilliantly, and everything seems to be interconnected very well. I have a couple of AirPods and these connect effortlessly with the phone. Considering that many people believe that Samsung cameras are better, I thought that the mines felt quite 'too good' and the images started to look fake / shallow and too bright / colorful. On the iPhone, the images are of amazing quality and they look real unlike those of Samsung. Both operating systems come pre-loaded with apps that you won't necessarily use or need, however on the iPhone they can be easily removed, while on Samsung it can be a bit more difficult. Everything Apple seems to be configured and connected very well and it is so simple but of great quality. Apple may not be as customizable as Android, however that didn't bother me too much. I would never go back to Android. Apple may not be as customizable as Android, however that didn't bother me too much. I would never go back to Android. Apple may not be as customizable as Android, however, that didn't bother me too much. I would never go back to Android.

Different operating systems differ from each other in terms of architecture, design, operation, and control. No OS 2 is exactly the same in that regard. For example, iOS does not allow the user to manipulate its internal components, while Android does, even indirectly.

Now coming to the features, an OS can either natively support it or it needs to be added as an update, but before that, it requires extensive testing and modifications to its inner core, which is a significant development. Therefore, it takes time to implement. Also, developers need to make sure it works the way it is advertised or, together with branding, they will have t

Keep reading

Different operating systems differ from each other in terms of architecture, design, operation, and control. No OS 2 is exactly the same in that regard. For example, iOS does not allow the user to manipulate its internal components, while Android does, even indirectly.

Now coming to the features, an OS can either natively support it or it needs to be added as an update, but before that, it requires extensive testing and modifications to its inner core, which is a significant development. Therefore, it takes time to implement. Also, developers must ensure that it works the way it is advertised or, together with branding, they will have to face serious consequences from the audience. So they take their own time to implement it in the first place.

Regardless of what he did, he obviously wasn't very successful.

But the demands aside, the uniform experience provided on iOS products, as well as the very well-run App Store, really put a big gap for Android to cross. It could be argued that it has not yet done so.

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