Was Steve Jobs a good human being?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Roger Merrill



Was Steve Jobs a good human being?

Steve. Yes.

Steve helped save the company he worked for. It improved the livelihoods of several thousand of us at Apple. When he spoke to us at meetings, he was inspiring and concerned with what we were trying to do. Together.

So Steve could gut people, particularly in front of an audience at communication meetings, and I think I've teased him a couple of times. We don't need to talk about it.

But...

One day I was having lunch at Caffe Macs. Most of the time at Apple I was pretty mired in whatever was going on with work, this day is no exception. I was in line to pay for my lunch and

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Steve. Yes.

Steve helped save the company he worked for. It improved the livelihoods of several thousand of us at Apple. When he spoke to us at meetings, he was inspiring and concerned with what we were trying to do. Together.

So Steve could gut people, particularly in front of an audience at communication meetings, and I think I've teased him a couple of times. We don't need to talk about it.

But...

One day I was having lunch at Caffe Macs. Most of the time at Apple I was pretty mired in whatever was going on with work, this day is no exception. I was in line to pay for my lunch and I went to get a napkin, I managed to drop the pile and I was picking it up, I murmured to the boy behind me, "I'm sorry." He said "don't worry, take your time." It was Steve. Now I've been to a couple of meetings where he and I collided. But this was not a job and he was great.

On another occasion, I was in building 1 on a weekend and heard a beating as if someone was yelling at the doors. Yes, the iCEO. I went downstairs and let him in "I forgot my badge, thanks for coming."

I think Steve outside of "work" was a really decent, humble and nice guy.

At work? He had a lot to do.

When I think of him, I think of the boy in the lunch line. "Do not worry, take your time". I don't think about the "legends" that arose around him. I had some difficult interactions with him, again I'm going to remember the lunch line, Steve.

Many people have opinions about him based on what has been written, but remember that not all of these things are true and many myths have been created. Most of the things written about Steve are BS. In the flesh, he was just a boy.

Heh I never actually met the man, but one of his vice presidents asked me to give a presentation on the new tools for education that Apple could produce and commercialize. This was around the time that Jobs returned to Apple and was making his first Mac World keynote in years.

I arrived at the door of his room ready with my presentation on disk (remember those) and a handy folder full of notes. I was greeted by the angry sounds of swearing and the movement of furniture. Nevertheless, I knocked on the door.

The vice president of education poked his head around the door and meekly told me that Mr.

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Heh I never actually met the man, but one of his vice presidents asked me to give a presentation on the new tools for education that Apple could produce and commercialize. This was around the time that Jobs returned to Apple and was making his first Mac World keynote in years.

I arrived at the door of his room ready with my presentation on disk (remember those) and a handy folder full of notes. I was greeted by the angry sounds of swearing and the movement of furniture. Nevertheless, I knocked on the door.

The vice president of education poked his head around the door and meekly told me that Mr. Jobs was not dating anyone at the time. He asked me for the presentation materials and I gave them to him. Dumb! Two minutes later, that vice president walked out the door and informed me that he had just been fired. I didn't have my supplies with him. I walked away puzzled and feeling stupid.

About three months later, Apple was producing two products that included two essential concepts from my presentation. Other concepts were ignored, but the essence of what I proposed was in the first new Macs that drove the company's turnaround. Coincidence? Maybe. The central ideas were so obvious that others must have noticed them. Still, I felt ripped off.

What. Jobs was a brilliant and difficult man and he changed the world in many dimensions. I have to admire it.

I liked Steve. Even though he was the only CEO I ever worked with who never really gave me valuable advice or advice (a display of his intelligence) and could be a bit dismissive at times, I was always eager to meet him. It was difficult to get a lot of information from Steve about the future of Apple, but if you could catch him at the right time and he was patient enough with what I'm sure he found were tedious questions, and if I came across a topic, he was in the mood for talking about what usually ended up being very grateful to have met and learned something very important.

I made the mistake

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I liked Steve. Even though he was the only CEO I ever worked with who never really gave me valuable advice or advice (a display of his intelligence) and could be a bit dismissive at times, I was always eager to meet him. It was difficult to get a lot of information from Steve about the future of Apple, but if you could catch him at the right time and he was patient enough with what I'm sure he found were tedious questions, and if I came across a topic, he was in the mood for talking about what usually ended up being very grateful to have met and learned something very important.

I made the mistake on more than one occasion of asking questions about his interest or his experience with meditation or LSD. I'm not sure anyone has ever asked him that kind of thing and he was always shocked and a little upset as a result of my question.

Steve was not a warm and fuzzy guy and my attempts at humor found deaf ears. I don't really know how good a guy he was to other people, but he showed loyalty to me and gave me a second chance after a new employee of ours in research made a big mistake which was ultimately a lack of proper management in me. part

So even though he had a rough exterior, he showed compassion, empathy, and loyalty that I consider to be the hallmarks of a good human being.

Jeff Christian.

If you saw a room full of gold and a nine foot tall guy walked up to the door to block you, would you become bad enough to try and fight the guy?

Of course you would.

Jobs was a pioneer in his area, producing the first usable object-oriented computers, with a more versatile control, the mouse and keyboard. It faced a lot of resistance from people who just wanted to play it safe, enjoy the profits rather than repatriate them to R&D and increase stale marketing. I was desperate, always wanting to be on the move.

How many people have that kind of energy or want such driving?

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If you saw a room full of gold and a nine foot tall guy walked up to the door to block you, would you become bad enough to try and fight the guy?

Of course you would.

Jobs was a pioneer in his area, producing the first usable object-oriented computers, with a more versatile control, the mouse and keyboard. It faced a lot of resistance from people who just wanted to play it safe, enjoy the profits rather than repatriate them to R&D and increase stale marketing. I was desperate, always wanting to be on the move.

How many people have that kind of energy or want that boost? Not many.

So it had to be bad, to the point that there was a civil war at Apple, fights with Wozniack. He had to force people to do things for him or else he would end up doing it all. And that's not a recipe for focusing on a vision, when you're distracted by busy work.

Can't blame him for that.

I never met the guy, but I read his biography, which seems well regarded as accurate.

It seems to me that the man was horrible. He might be nice if he thinks you have something he wants, he might be completely dismissive of you and ridicule him in public the next day. You refused to acknowledge or support your newborn for a long time.

Basically, Jobs was excellent at exploiting those around him to get what he wanted, regardless of the consequences or the impact it had on the exploited. Even in the early days, when the opportunity arose to scam Wozniak, his business partner by lyin

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I never met the guy, but I read his biography, which seems well regarded as accurate.

It seems to me that the man was horrible. He might be nice if he thinks you have something he wants, he might be completely dismissive of you and ridicule him in public the next day. You refused to acknowledge or support your newborn for a long time.

Basically, Jobs was excellent at exploiting those around him to get what he wanted, regardless of the consequences or the impact it had on the exploited. Even in the early days, when the opportunity arose to scam Wozniak, his business partner, by lying to him about the value of a deal, he did.

It seems to me that Jobs was a really terrible person, who succeeded in spite of himself. We need less of these people, not more.

No, he's not a good memory person. I admire him a lot but he was not a good person. He rudely spoke to Elon Musk at a party (didn't know who Elon Musk is)

denied that Lisa was his daughter. his girlfriend and son lived on welfare. He fired people immediately when they couldn't explain what they were doing.

not all people are good. Steve Jobs had a lot of good and bad things.

some good things

Steve Jobs was really cool. He took humanity to the next level.

Later he accepted that Lisa is his daughter. Introduced many revolutionary products.

made the computer easy to use.

I can't speak to the man without meeting him directly, but I do know a few Steve Jobs protégés from my time in the Valley, and although they are second-hand stories, I think working with him directly sounds like it would be horrible. . However, he raised some successful entrepreneurs, whom I consider to be decent human beings, but some of the most paranoid people I have ever had the pleasure of meeting. I notice in them a trait of feeling that someone could at any moment betray a personal relationship for personal gain. I imagine if you were Steve Jobs, you might have that personality trait.

So, he didn't want to support his own daughter, he was infamous for "gutting" people, but if he's in line behind you and says "Take your time" and actually thanks you for letting him into the building, he was a good kind. .

Some people really need to get out of Silicon Valley from time to time.

Steve Jobs was really that bad at what?

The question cannot be answered without quantifying what you think you may have been wrong at. By all accounts, he was a micromanager, a very successful marketer, a visionary. And yet, he was also known for his intolerance of failure, of ignorance, of just about anything that was not within his range of vision.

So no, he really wasn't that bad at the things that made him successful.

But yeah, he really was that bad at those things that gave him a certain notoriety.

Steve was a mystic, a dervish, a monk, and a fakir. You cannot help create such beautiful products without having a very deep understanding of the human experience. Steve was a seeker and understood life on a very deep level. It helped put tools in our hands, which irreversibly helped make the world a much better place. Steve has helped usher in a new form of lighting. Now, it is up to each of us to bear the witness.

He is no longer so arguing whether he was a good human being or not is useless. He made some of the best gadgets and that's how we know him.

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