Should you tell someone if you know you are going to be fired?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Gabriel Bennett



Should you tell someone if you know you are going to be fired?

No. One, it is not your place to divulge that information. In addition, doing so could jeopardize your job and that of your superiors and leave the company open to potential lawsuit.

It doesn't matter how close you are to your potential former co-worker or how wrong you think you may be; the fact that you have been made aware of the information is a red flag for me. Scenarios: You were eavesdropping (bad), your boss is unable to discuss business behind closed doors (another mistake), your co-worker who was the source of the rumors has a big mouth (worthy of shame), or your space work has no idea what

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No. One, it is not your place to divulge that information. In addition, doing so could jeopardize your job and that of your superiors and leave the company open to potential lawsuit.

It doesn't matter how close you are to your potential former co-worker or how wrong you think you may be; the fact that you have been made aware of the information is a red flag for me. Scenarios: You were eavesdropping (bad), your boss is unable to discuss business behind closed doors (another mistake), your co-worker who was the source of the rumors has a big mouth (worthy of shame), or your space work has no idea what is the term "loose lips sink ships" (do not apply there!).

You may think you're right, but if you said so, you deserve to be fired on the spot. Also, unless you got it directly from the boss, how do you know you have the correct information?

Absolutely not. That is not your thing. And in some companies, your disclosure of private information could get you fired.

And furthermore, if they are entitled to unemployment benefits, any disclosure could cause them to take action that could affect the availability of those benefits.

However, if they are friends, it would keep their mouths shut, but it might encourage them to look for another job. But let the pieces fall where they can, you really shouldn't even have that kind of information.

I would like. Wouldn't you want to know? It is unfair to be surprised. If your friend were aware of the impending loss of her job, she would have a chance to respond in any way she wants. I hate when I can look back and wish I had handled something in a different way. It would also give you time to look for another job by leaving little to no space on your resume. Wouldn't it be nice if you found a new job and quit before you get fired?

You should have some idea if they are doing their job correctly. (Also known as a trial period). If the trial period is a load of shit and the decision is already made, I would not only tell you, but I will resign because I am working with an unethical group of people.

Repeat after me "The rescuer becomes the victim." Period.

Nothing good will come of sharing this news. Play in different ways. There is no reward for anyone. Your friend won't thank you.

Be there after the ax falls and never, ever, whisper a word about knowing before.

Just leave them an anonymous note, nothing that can be traced back to you.

Unless they're selfish and you don't like them, follow the instructions in some of the ballless cuckold answers here and keep quiet.

You will receive more warnings if it is a larger company. In small businesses, the warning may be zero.

As soon as a manager puts something negative in writing, it is a red flag. If you get something like, "On September 4, we discussed <X> and you agreed with <Y>, but then <Z>", you should know that something is happening. There will likely be factual inaccuracies. You should correct your boss, in writing, but don't expect it to do you any good in terms of keeping your job. Just do that to make it clear that you can play the documentation game too, and that you won't go down without a fight,

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You will receive more warnings if it is a larger company. In small businesses, the warning may be zero.

As soon as a manager puts something negative in writing, it is a red flag. If you get something like, "On September 4, we discussed <X> and you agreed with <Y>, but then <Z>", you should know that something is happening. There will likely be factual inaccuracies. You should correct your boss, in writing, but don't expect it to do you any good in terms of keeping your job. You just do that to make it clear that you can play the documentation game too, and that you won't go down without a fight, so you are more likely to be given more time to get out on your own terms and severance if you are eventually fired.

A Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) is a clear indication. Hardly anyone approves of PIPs. Either you fail (and get fired) or it's ruled "unfinished," meaning you could face another PIP in 6 months. (HR didn't think he could get fired for cheap. "Inconclusive" means he has the same boss, more pissed off.) The only time people approve of PIPs is when they change managers mid-PIP (and that's usually only possible when their current manager leaves, because people don't want PIP employees to transfer to their teams) and the new manager likes them.

Once you're in a PIP, you better be looking for a job. Document each interview as a sick day, related to a disclosed health issue, and demand that your manager and HR adapt to it by adding time in the PIP. They hate that. It's not going to save your job, but set the precedent that things are happening on your terms. Demand a time study for a PIP and, if they laugh at it, say that you are going to talk to some unions about evaluating the performance appraisal process (including your PIP) for the time study. (If they fire you early, they are guilty of retaliation. However, they can still legally fire you at the end of your PIP.) Remember: your goal is not to keep your job (you can't) but to scare them into paralysis or capitulation, to get out on your own terms. Once you get another job, tell absolutely no one where you are going until you have been in the new place for at least 6 months. You don't want your boss or some other adversary to find out where you are going and take you down.

The end of the game is unpredictable and dangerous whatever happens, so you can't bet on anything. Even if you do everything right, you may not get compensation and be fired early, even if you think they can't legally. (At-will employment is very complicated and often undefined in demeanor, but this also means that some companies take risks that no attorney would endorse.) Therefore, do not count on severance pay. Your goal really should be to get another job, while still employed, before the ax falls. The benefit of being employed while looking for work is worth more than compensation. People who are already employed easily get 10% higher salaries and are assigned to better projects,

If you end up in a layoff negotiation and the cash is enough to cover the expected duration of a job search, go ahead. Request the right to represent yourself as an employee. You may want to agree on a good referral, but that's not that important if you're pretty sure they won't give you a bad referral. (Obviously, you don't want to use your manager.) Use a partner or ally as a reference.

If you are fired during a job search process, do not update any of the companies you are currently interviewing about that development. (It is of no use, because no one will consider you ethically obligated to do so.) You also don't want to update your CV. As for whether you continue to represent yourself as an employee, if you have been formally granted that right, the answer is an obvious yes. If you haven't, the answer is "it depends." In that case, you need to weigh the risk of being caught against the risk of your unemployment being counted against you.

I once worked for a serious jerk and he fired someone on Monday. He knew they had a trip of over an hour to get to work, so he let them in, waited until they got their coffee, settled in, and turned on his terminal, and then called them.

He fired them, told them he would give them 5 minutes to make whatever statement they wanted to make and then leave. He also pointed out that yes, he had calculated on an extra day (the same Monday) that he had to pay them to make it legal to call them ... but ... only 4 hours, the "minimum call" in the state.

Later, the company changed the policy so that all layoffs occur on Thursday.

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I once worked for a serious jerk and he fired someone on Monday. He knew they had a trip of over an hour to get to work, so he let them in, waited until they got their coffee, settled in, and turned on his terminal, and then called them.

He fired them, told them he would give them 5 minutes to make whatever statement they wanted to make and then leave. He also pointed out that yes, he had calculated on an extra day (the same Monday) that he had to pay them to make it legal to call them ... but ... only 4 hours, the "minimum call" in the state.

Later, the company changed the policy so that all layoffs are on Thursdays (payday, so we'd have your check waiting by now). Even then, this guy was crazy about it. The guideline was that you were supposed to call the person before lunch, say around 10:30, and let them go. However, they were paid for the entire day, so this guy would wait until 15 minutes before the end of the person's shift and tell them then.

He's the main reason HR eventually took over the role and took it out of individual managers' hands as to when notices are given.


I once had the option of accepting a transfer or being fired. This came up the day before Christmas Eve (12/23). I would go to the company Christmas lunch and then go home if I accepted the transfer.

If not, I would have to work until 3:30 in the morning on 12/24, I would not be able to go to lunch and it would be ready at the end of the day. I was told this just before I went home on December 23rd and that my response was due at 8:00 a.m. M. The next morning.


The worst case I ever heard of was a son of a bitch who fired an accounting assistant out of the blue. They were in a production in Canada (Toronto area) and this guy called her, fired her, and told her to get out of the production office right away. That would be bad enough until he went on to say:

- He had called the hotel and canceled his room. The production would only pay until last night. So it seemed like he had about 10 minutes to make the 30 minute trip to the hotel to avoid another (expensive) charge on his own bill.

- She also immediately informed the Canadian government that she was fired, thus revoking her work visa. He had only 24 hours, starting about an hour ago, to leave the country. And good luck with that, because ...

- ... since she didn't complete her homework, he canceled her plane ticket.

- Not that it matters, since the hotel would probably retain your passport anyway with new charges on your bill.

Fortunately, a friendly hotel manager did not charge him even though he was almost an hour late. She also did not have her passport, as she did not owe anything. She called her boyfriend ... the hotel allowed her to hang out in the lobby ... but there they found a snag.

He didn't have the money for a ticket from Toronto to Los Angeles and there were some red tape involved as well. He would have to go to the international area of ​​the Toronto airport and wait until he could raise the money and go through all the obstacles that the airline wanted.

Finally, another hotel employee came up with an idea. She could afford a bus to Buffalo, New York. That would get her to cross the border legally and it was only about a 5 hour drive. From there, the groom could get a less expensive ticket home without any international red tape.

From what I have experienced, it is generally poor leadership and / or cultural adjustment to feel threatened by the employee.

Cultural adjustment

"Cultural adaptation" means different things to different organizations and is evaluated in different ways. But in the vast majority of cases in the US, it's all about social adequacy and how similar you are to everyone else. It is usually a big problem in settings that primarily want racial and / or gender / sex homogeneity or settings that are more social than traditional work settings and have direct or indirect social requirements.

So basically good employees get fired for "c

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From what I have experienced, it is generally poor leadership and / or cultural adjustment to feel threatened by the employee.

Cultural adjustment

"Cultural adaptation" means different things to different organizations and is evaluated in different ways. But in the vast majority of cases in the US, it's all about social adequacy and how similar you are to everyone else. It is usually a big problem in settings that primarily want racial and / or gender / sex homogeneity or settings that are more social than traditional work settings and have direct or indirect social requirements.

So basically, good employees are fired for “culturally fitting” because they don't fit in, not because they aren't good at their job.

I have experienced this type of "cultural adjustment" as a problem in three jobs and I got fired from two of them (and I quit the other and never came back). With one of those two jobs, the manager who accompanied me was upset and actually told me to use it as a job reference, so that says a lot. I had also told that manager and another leader to her face that I would quit that job at some point for all the shit (I had another job that I could easily go to, but I was looking for one that paid more than that. One before I left), And then when I told another leader, that the same as getting fired was finally a game of "I'm going to quit" - "No you won't, you're fired!"

Poor leadership feels threatened

I've seen people on Quora who I assume are currently in leadership positions and deny that some leaders feel threatened by employees who are smarter than they are. But really bad leaders do it when those employees talk about problems, bad decisions, things that are not done well, things that can be done better, better ideas, etc. With bad leaders, those employees run the risk of exposing bad leadership to everyone. otherwise, potentially resulting in the leadership losing respect and followers. Many leaders also do not want to be questioned or challenged, they want total control and for everyone to follow.

At work I mentioned where they left me, I did all this, although it was done in private and not in front of everyone ... so I did the double no-no of not fitting into a really social environment, outgoing and challenging two or three of the leaders there. They fired me, they fought for 2 to 3 months to fill my position while I had another job within two hours of being fired; it would have been sooner, but I had to leave a voicemail and wait for them to call me back, and ultimately they transferred the position to someone from another department of the company ... a fairly recent college graduate who could be paid less,

I feel sorry for the boy because I know what they are putting him through at work, although it might be easier with him since he really fits in with them socially, but it is very easy for them to leave. But I also love it because it is a perfect demonstration of what is really important to some of them, as there is no way I can do that job well enough for their expectations and it is nowhere near meeting the standards they had for. the candidates for that position when I was hired.

Four reasons:

First, because no decent person likes to mess with someone else's life. You know that by firing them you are throwing their life into chaos, especially financially. Most people do not have the financial reserves to survive without work for a long time. He or she may be lousy at work and also an idiot, but in the end, he or she is human and most people do not like to do things that cause pain to others.

Second, because it ruins the lives of both the manager and co-workers. Now the manager has to find someone to replace that person, while also helping to cover up the problem.

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Four reasons:

First, because no decent person likes to mess with someone else's life. You know that by firing them you are throwing their life into chaos, especially financially. Most people do not have the financial reserves to survive without work for a long time. He or she may be lousy at work and also an idiot, but in the end, he or she is human and most people do not like to do things that cause pain to others.

Second, because it ruins the lives of both the manager and co-workers. Now the manager has to find someone to replace that person, at the same time helping to cover the empty chair. The saying goes, an empty chair does less work than a full one. And that means coworkers have to step up to cover as well. It impacts everyone.

Third, if you are familiar with the developmental stages of Tuckman's group, replacing any member of the team, even a bad one, brings the group back into formation. And then when you find the replacement, go back to Form. Often times, a manager feels that this is not the time to deal with all those group dynamics.

And finally, because the simple truth is that there are rarely horrible employees. Most employees have strengths and weaknesses. Horrible employees are those in whom weaknesses outweigh strengths. But often the manager sees that the "horrible" employee is, in fact, trying to address weaknesses (whereas most co-workers are not). So the manager is willing to give the employee time to try to figure it out, especially because of my points above.

I once had a guy working for me who was almost impossible to work with. I liked him as a person and he did brilliant work, but he was often rude, undoing group work on his own whim, and often just disappearing to focus on his own work while people needed to talk to him in order to do so. continue on your own.

However, it was very difficult to fire him because, in the end, his job was brilliant, he surpassed everyone by far and he was trying to solve his problems with me as his manager.

In the end, I had to internalize that he was holding on to everyone else and finally fired him, probably 6 months late. But it was still difficult.

Most office spaces, warehouses, manufacturing plants, and the like are "employee-only" spaces. Companies don't want employees to be hassled by anyone else, they don't want to risk company property being damaged or stolen, and their insurance probably won't cover injury to anyone except authorized employees or visitors.

If you have been laid off, you are no longer an employee. Therefore, you do not have the right to be on company property, in particular, to associate with company employees.

You may find it embarrassing, and even ridiculous, that you have been fired and have lost all the privileges and freedoms you had.

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Most office spaces, warehouses, manufacturing plants, and the like are "employee-only" spaces. Companies don't want employees to be hassled by anyone else, they don't want to risk company property being damaged or stolen, and their insurance probably won't cover injury to anyone except authorized employees or visitors.

If you have been laid off, you are no longer an employee. Therefore, you do not have the right to be on company property, in particular, to associate with company employees.

You may find it embarrassing, and even ridiculous, that you have been fired and have lost all the privileges and freedoms you once had as an employee. But the fact is, you don't belong there anymore. You do not have the right to interfere or distract anyone from your work.

Especially in the case of a recently fired employee, who is likely to resent the idea of ​​being fired and who may feel humiliated at having been summarily fired for some outrageous indiscretion or insubordination or criminal misconduct or act. If a person in such a situation were allowed to say goodbye, he would undoubtedly try to say much more.

A person who has just been fired is probably full of vitriol against the company and may even be violently angry. You may even feel that other employees were the cause of your dismissal and will want to “get back” on them. It could be very dangerous to let someone roam the office in such a circumstance.

This is why a company will generally have a security person escort the newly trained student off the premises, directly to their car, even following them until they live in the parking lot and reach a public street. If a person is given the privilege of cleaning their own desk, after being fired, that is always done under the supervision of the security guard or manager, and the former employee is not allowed to speak to anyone else. You will not even be allowed to go to the bathroom alone.

The way you can avoid the embarrassment of being immediately escorted off the premises is to always behave in such a way that the company never has a reason to fire you.

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