Should you start your own business or work for someone else?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Katie Gordon



Should you start your own business or work for someone else?

It depends on what you are looking for at this point in your life. My first jobs were in startups, but eventually I joined a big company. This is why.

  1. Startups often offer more responsibility and more cutting edge work for engineers. This is particularly exciting if you are a beginning engineer trying to make your mark. They also offer the possibility, however small, to get rich quickly by giving first hires a generous amount of capital in the company. However, in return, you may be expected to work long hours for short pay, and sometimes not receive paychecks. My first job outside of school was in a 5 person start.
Keep reading

It depends on what you are looking for at this point in your life. My first jobs were in startups, but eventually I joined a big company. This is why.

  1. Startups often offer more responsibility and more cutting edge work for engineers. This is particularly exciting if you are a beginning engineer trying to make your mark. They also offer the possibility, however small, to get rich quickly by giving first hires a generous amount of capital in the company. However, in return, you may be expected to work long hours for short pay, and sometimes not receive paychecks. My first job outside of school was at a 5 person startup. I made $ 25,000 a year for five years in a row, although with only 6 months on the job my title changed from computer programmer to something like head of commercial software development. There were several lost paychecks and a lot of ramen and a few bad checks as I struggled to keep up with the rent. We didn't get rich and I eventually joined another startup that paid much better (more than double my first salary) but demanded extremely long hours when we had to meet deadlines. For several weeks in a row I worked more than 16 hours a day, 7 days a week. Both startups eventually went under and I was on the verge of personal bankruptcy at the end of that experience. 7 days a week. Both startups eventually went under and I was on the verge of personal bankruptcy at the end of that experience. 7 days a week. Both startups eventually went under and I was on the verge of personal bankruptcy at the end of that experience.
  2. At that time, I decided to join a great company. Large companies are more stable than startups. Typically, you can expect a large company to be within a few years. They will provide a regular and larger paycheck. They will have good health care and retirement plans. However, they won't give you an appreciable amount of equity unless you're a superstar, but most tech companies will give you at least some stocks or stock options. While startups will often send you up front on day one with nothing more than a can of spam and a little pea shooter, large companies will generally give you time to orient yourself, provide training, and make sure you're reasonably fueled before joining. to fight. At the same time,

And what are you looking for? Emotion, responsibility, and the (small) chance to get rich faster? Or a regular paycheck and the knowledge that your job (and your company) will likely be around for a while? When I was young, the former seemed the way to go. But after almost 10 years of startups, I realized that my bank account, as well as my health, physical and mental, were better served in a large company.

I started my own business when I was a 3rd year student. I do not have my personal experience working as a head of a traditional service in a company. I run a company with a presence in 4 countries now, after 14 years in business and with a team size of more than 300 people. I have experience dealing with many team members who work for my corporation.

I think both corporate work and business are good and good options. What you should be doing depends on what makes you happy. But there are some cases when you shouldn't start a business:

  1. You just want to earn money; believes that businesses can provide you with huge
Keep reading

I started my own business when I was a 3rd year student. I do not have my personal experience working as a head of a traditional service in a company. I run a company with a presence in 4 countries now, after 14 years in business and with a team size of more than 300 people. I have experience dealing with many team members who work for my corporation.

I think both corporate work and business are good and good options. What you should be doing depends on what makes you happy. But there are some cases when you shouldn't start a business:

  1. All you want is to make money - you believe that business can make large amounts of money and you want to do business just to make money. If this is what you think, business is not your place. Business is about solving people's problems. Business is about doing good through your idea and effort. If you can really solve people's problem through your product or service, people will pay you enough (probably more than you thought / imagine). But the money will only be a by-product. If you only pursue money in business, there is a chance that you may not even have enough money to live long-term.
  2. You want to be your own boss, you can't tolerate anyone else ordering you, you don't want to follow what others say, it's your way or highway, if this is what you want, you think you'll get a business, don't start a business. You have to make so much commitment and you have to be so tolerant that you can't even imagine it. Starting from a negotiation with a client to accommodating to the utter negligence / inefficiency of your employee, you have to deal with everything with tolerance and a smile.
  3. You think you have a great idea: if you start a business, someone will buy it with a lot of money, you can apply for early retirement. There may be stories of this type available on the market; I have not met that person. Business is about driving a mission, believing in something; If you're not so determined to make your dream come true, business may not be your cup of tea.
  4. You don't like going to the office early in the morning and you want to manage your daily life according to your own wishes; You will probably have to be more regular in business and have to spend much more time building business than you will in a corporate service.

In general, business is a way of life. It is not a race. Corporate work is a career - you climb a ladder / path. It is clear, safe and bright. Business is uncertain, glamorous, and offers an immense opportunity against total uncertainty (sometimes calculated uncertainty).

It's about your personal preferences. What makes your heart sing!

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.