Should you find a new job if your job doesn't pay as much as it used to?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Cole Pratt



Should you find a new job if your job doesn't pay as much as it used to?

The real question to ask yourself is:

What has changed within my industry that means my job no longer requires the pay it used to have?

The work you are currently doing is sliding down the value chain, so you need to understand why.

Has your role become a commodity?

Are there too many people with similar abilities causing an oversupply?

Is your industry going through a digital transformation?

Has your industry been affected? Think Uber, WeWork, Tesla.

We live in a unique time in history where every job in every industry will, at some point soon, be affected by technology, if it hasn't already.

Why am I a

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The real question to ask yourself is:

What has changed within my industry that means my job no longer requires the pay it used to have?

The work you are currently doing is sliding down the value chain, so you need to understand why.

Has your role become a commodity?

Are there too many people with similar abilities causing an oversupply?

Is your industry going through a digital transformation?

Has your industry been affected? Think Uber, WeWork, Tesla.

We live in a unique time in history where every job in every industry will, at some point soon, be affected by technology, if it hasn't already.

Why am I answering your question by talking about technology?

Because technological development causes changes.

People mainly love what technology can do for them as consumers. In health, finance, logistics, education, transportation, food products, media and communications.

Almost all industries will change due to the advancement of technological developments in their industrial sector.

But some people fear this will end their job security and put them out of work.

And for some it will. For others, technology will create new and previously unimaginable opportunities to experience a new kind of work.

You don't need to fear technology. BUT you need to be aware of how technology will affect your industry sector and anticipate what's on the horizon.

Do you know where your industry is heading? If not, do some research on the web about future trends.

Don't change jobs just for pay. Take the time to understand what is coming next. Do what most people don't do until it's too late. Learn a new skill that employers in your industry will need in the future. If you want better pay, you should keep an eye on your industry for niche skills that employers value and will pay a higher premium for.

Trade your job for a position with future opportunities; in the long run, this will serve you better.

Confusing question, right? It means that your salary has decreased or that your expenses have increased. Hard question if you see what I mean

About getting a job with a higher salary logic determined that if you do not need a salary increase to live your life, stay in your current job and situation

If a life of pain, misery, bills and unpaid bills and debts, then don't change a thing, just live as is

But surely a new job for additional income will help you live a better life and possibly save for the future.

He would surely get a new job with additional pay, possibly fewer hours, and less stress.

I can save a

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Confusing question, right? It means that your salary has decreased or that your expenses have increased. Hard question if you see what I mean

About getting a job with a higher salary logic determined that if you do not need a salary increase to live your life, stay in your current job and situation

If a life of pain, misery, bills and unpaid bills and debts, then don't change a thing, just live as is

But surely a new job for additional income will help you live a better life and possibly save for the future.

He would surely get a new job with additional pay, possibly fewer hours, and less stress.

I can save at least 10% each month and still have money for my weed every day.

The first thing I would do if I didn't want to get a new job would be to list all my expenses every penny I pay to other people. Then eliminate the clear waste of money like coffee in the morning. I am not a movie star. I can have coffee at home and at work, stop buying lunch and snacks, take my own lunch, etc. Take the bus or train if it is cheaper than driving or cycling if possible

Stop drinking at night after work, go for a walk or work instead of being a member of the gym

Man, there are so many things I can do to save money

Good luck, happy savings

Look at your long-term prospects in your current job:

(a) Do you enjoy your job? Maybe it's something you really like to do and you do well. If so, the enjoyment can more than make up for the lower income.

(b) What are the chances of advancement in your current job? Maybe there will be good opportunities to climb the ladder in a few years, such as new branches, opening new product lines, retirements that open job vacancies, etc.

(c) What are the alternative job opportunities? What is available if you leave your current job? If there is nothing appealing, you may have to stay where you are for a while.

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Look at your long-term prospects in your current job:

(a) Do you enjoy your job? Maybe it's something you really like to do and you do well. If so, the enjoyment can more than make up for the lower income.

(b) What are the chances of advancement in your current job? Maybe there will be good opportunities to climb the ladder in a few years, such as new branches, opening new product lines, retirements that open job vacancies, etc.

(c) What are the alternative job opportunities? What is available if you leave your current job? If there is nothing appealing, you may have to stay where you are for a while or prepare for another line of work while you watch.

If you think you can do better, do it. Also, consider what your current skills are and how you can make them more valuable. To do more you have to know more. Now is the time to make the necessary adjustments to improve future events. Worth the effort. Learn more about the current and future direction of economic trends to stay on top of what's happening.

You are the only one who can answer that question. If it's frustrating and unbearable, then yes. Just keep in mind that changing jobs isn't always the answer. You could end up in a much worse situation. IT HAPPENED TO ME BUT I HAD BURNED BRIDGES WITH MY PREVIOUS EMPLOYER.

Hi, In the main job I had before becoming a freelancer, back in the 1990s, I started with around $ 25,000 / year and finished around $ 40,000 / year just before quitting. At the time, my wife and I lived in a 1,000-square-foot apartment. We carefully tracked our expenses and in a typical month we spent $ 1,700 on everything, total (food, gas, rent, insurance, utilities, everything). Keep this figure in mind for later.

I live in a mid-size city in the US and earn more than $ 300,000 a year from my businesses. In general, it is much, much better than making $ 100,000 per year or less. I will try to give some ideas.

After

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Hi, In the main job I had before becoming a freelancer, back in the 1990s, I started with around $ 25,000 / year and finished around $ 40,000 / year just before quitting. At the time, my wife and I lived in a 1,000-square-foot apartment. We carefully tracked our expenses and in a typical month we spent $ 1,700 on everything, total (food, gas, rent, insurance, utilities, everything). Keep this figure in mind for later.

I live in a mid-size city in the US and earn more than $ 300,000 a year from my businesses. In general, it is much, much better than making $ 100,000 per year or less. I will try to give some ideas.

After we quit our jobs and got some clients, we made about $ 100,000 a year for several years. This seemed like a lot, and we were able to move out of the apartment into a decent house. It still seemed like a great income, although in hindsight we weren't saving as much. In a few years we bought a bigger house and moved in, selling the old one. The mortgage payments on the new house seemed exaggerated and I remember being worried about them. I think they all said it was going to cost around $ 1,500 a month.

During this time, I decided that my goal should be to earn $ 250,000 a year. That sounded like A LOT. I felt that if we could do so much, then we had accomplished it. I promised myself that once we made that much money in a single year, I would buy a fully equipped home theater system that could cost $ 10,000. After all, if you are making $ 250,000, what is $ 10,000?

I have never bought that system yet! :-)

Eventually we acquired another company, and in the mid-2000s we had a good year where our revenue reached $ 270,000. Exciting! But then it dropped back down to $ 114,000 the following year and stayed at $ 100,000 for a few years, as the earnings of the self-employed can go up and down significantly. It even went down to $ 88,000 a year not too long ago.

Since then it has continued to rise, thankfully. $ 137K, $ 233K, $ 378K, $ 430K, and around $ 519,000 for 2015 (that's an estimate). Note that these amounts include business earnings, which are not always withdrawn as personal spending money (distributions). But they are taxed every year!

We do not live an extravagant lifestyle by any means. I drive a very old car, for example. But our cost of living keeps going up and up. Health insurance, mortgage, food, utilities in the largest house, yard maintenance, a new roof, iPhones, Netflix, etc. all add up. Now, do you remember how we lived for $ 1,700 a month in the apartment?

That is less than our mortgage payment now! Our health insurance costs around $ 750 a month! Mad.

Anyway, what is it like to earn more than $ 300,000 a year? The first thing is taxes. When you earn less, you don't think about taxes as much. But once you get into these much higher numbers, the tax payments start to be staggering. We will pay more taxes for 2015 than all of our annual gross income for virtually any year from 1993 to 2006. So, taxes have a huge impact, and you really feel it. I have no problem paying taxes, I am happy to support my country, but yes, it hurts a little to see that so much money is lost. And you have to pay estimated taxes on a quarterly basis and they keep going up and up every year in incredible amounts.

But I will say that there is a lot of cash left. You begin to feel that the amounts that used to seem significant no longer worry you much. When you have $ 400,000 in cash in your bank accounts (not including retirement accounts), then the idea of ​​spending a few hundred or even a few thousand on something seems almost irrelevant. Especially when you know it will bring in another $ 400-500k (gross) in the current year. I mean, what is the difference between $ 400,000 and $ 395,000? They start to look like the same number, more or less.

However, at the same time, I am still a very frugal person. It is not necessarily easy to spend those hundreds that I mentioned. I will not buy expensive cars, watches, clothes, toys, or vacations. I would like to take a vacation in Europe and I would have no mental problem with spending $ 5,000 on that, but I don't want to waste money or spend it frivolously.

So I think he largely retains whatever his old attitude towards money was. Living cheaply in our old apartment, we developed a rather frugal attitude. So now we have money, but that attitude remains.

The funny thing is, now that our income is so much higher and we have money in the bank, I really want more! I want to make $ 600k or $ 700k or a million in a single year. They say that people always think they will be happy when they have / earn about twice what they currently do. I guess it applies. When we hit $ 27,000 that year, I probably thought $ 500,000 would be enough. Now that we've done it, I feel like a million would be enough. And so it goes.

With this level of income, we cannot buy things like Lamborghinis. I mean ... we could, we have the cash on hand to buy one easily. But it would be incredibly stupid to waste our money like that.

Instead, we'd really like to fully fund our retirement and, in a way, take a leap forward in that regard by setting aside maybe $ 200,000 just for that purpose. A few years ago we thought we would need to save $ 30,000 a year to comfortably reach retirement, so starting with a large amount would be wonderful.

Currently I have spent a lot of time looking for how to invest our free cash and / or create or buy another business. I hope to find something quite passive but that allows us to turn our savings of $ 400,000 into a lot more. Some of the things I have looked at include buying rental real estate, selling on Amazon, reinvesting more in one of my companies, and the good stock market. It's a bit of a pain to have all that cash in hand, earning only about 0.95% interest each year (yay for Discover Bank!).

I'm a bit lazy ... sometimes I want to start another company and really get things going and sell it for millions or billions in a few years (you know ... like WhatsApp :-)) ... other times just I want to laze around and watch movies on our old big-screen TV (you know, the rear-projection kind). That's right, we haven't upgraded since we bought that one in 2001 with a bonus money a client gave me for working over the weekend.

Oh, and it seems like the old saying about having multiple sources of income is true. We have the two companies with wages and earnings, some other write-in earnings, income from a rental we own, and a little interest here and there.

There is a clear sense of security and a bit of a sense of having "accomplished." But just a little. I still look at all those who have sold their companies for large amounts, or the guys who make millions annually on Wall Street, and I envy their money and their success. So I guess no matter how much you have, there is always someone with more.

EDIT: Despite my request to separate the questions, Quora Moderation has decided to keep this question paired with what I originally answered: "What are some jobs that don't justify salary?" What I have written does not make sense as an answer to the new question, but the good people of Quora do not seem to understand that they are completely different questions.


Mine! And possibly yours too.

The justification for the income of any individual is found in the free market value of his labor production. That is, a fair income is obtained when the employee (or employer) is willing to contribute

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EDIT: Despite my request to separate the questions, Quora Moderation has decided to keep this question paired with what I originally answered: "What are some jobs that don't justify salary?" What I have written does not make sense as an answer to the new question, but the good people of Quora do not seem to understand that they are completely different questions.


Mine! And possibly yours too.

The justification for the income of any individual is found in the free market value of his labor production. That is, a fair income is obtained when the employee (or business owner) is willing to provide services at the same price that the employer (or client) is willing to pay for those services, without artificial demands from outside parties. Most of these external distortions are government creations:

  • Taxes. I believe that there are some legitimate functions of government at various levels, and I support that taxes are necessary to fund those functions. My argument here is against the distortions that come from an extremely inequitable tax code.
    • Progressive income tax policies reduce the marginal returns to the highest wages; If the natural price of your labor is just above the limit of a certain tax bracket, you will choose to work slightly less and stay in the lower category, or you will demand artificially higher wages to make up for the additional amount lost to taxes.
    • Tax breaks granted to specific industries, corporations, or even specific events (think movie making) allow those companies to inflate their salaries relative to competitors.
  • Compulsory licenses, certification, etc. Conceptually, government licenses should be made on the basis of protecting the public from significant harm, especially when it comes to health problems (although even here I think there are good arguments against compulsory licenses). Now, governments demand all kinds of ridiculous professional licenses: hairdressers, public accountants, interior designers, contractors, etc. Who asks states to implement those licenses? There is no public outrage that these industries are riddled with incompetence and dangerousness. People who want to enforce licensing / certification programs are those who benefit financially from those licenses: companies with established practices,
  • Industry regulations. This one cuts both ways. Compliance in a heavily regulated industry generally means hiring (or hiring) people to ensure that a company is doing what the government wants. Therefore, you have to pay a significant amount of money to people who do little or nothing to improve the value of your company / product. Meanwhile, there is less money available to compensate the people who are actually doing the work.
  • Government competition against the private sector. In the name of reducing the cost to the public or making something more available to consumers (both are typically fallacies), governmental or quasi-governmental institutions place the burden of financial risk on the general public, while often distorting the profits of the employees. by those institutions. Higher education is one of the best examples I can think of here, especially when it comes to income from administrators and sports departments. Some of those salaries might be appropriate for their free market value, but since taxpayers fund so many other things that go on at the institution, it's hard to know if that soccer coach is really worth the millions of dollars they are being paid.
    • Public sector unions are a particularly bad actor here. Matthew Bates pointed to the ridiculous pension packages being given to retired administrators of Illinois public schools. It is inconceivable that we have allowed unions and politicians to collude against taxpayers for benefits that could not otherwise be justified.

So let's look at a few different jobs and think critically about whether the jobs really reflect a "market price."

  • Doctors. A 2017 survey showed median earnings for physicians of $ 294,000. Pediatricians are on the low side averaging $ 202,000, while orthopedic surgeons averaging $ 489,000. What determines your earnings? Almost all of a doctor's income comes from a third party, be it a public or private insurance plan. Insurers have reimbursement programs that base their rates on things like how many tests are requested, how much time is spent with a patient, the complexity of the patient's health problems, and more. Lately, there has been a major push to create a system that pays for results rather than job input, although this is an overly simplistic approach to a very difficult problem. I will not go into all the other problems that affect our healthcare system, Except to note that the regulatory burden is increasing exponentially. further increasing system costs. My point here is that there is a huge distortion in physician compensation because the consumer is actually two parties: the patient and the insurer. The patient, who initiates the transaction and receives the product, has a very different motivation than the insurer, which pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . who initiates the transaction and receives the product, has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . your employer selects your insurance and pays most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . your employer selects your insurance and pays most of it with money the employee never sees. . Whoever initiates the transaction and receives the product has a very different motivation from that of the insurer, who pays for the product but does not receive anything directly from the doctor. If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. . If there were a more direct financial relationship between the patient and the insurer, you could probably balance the equation, but in most of the United States, your employer selects your insurance and pays for most of it with money the employee never sees. .
  • Minimum wage employees. Not only do minimum wage laws skew the price of menial work, they also make it difficult for employers to structure their compensation plans to offer scheduled raises and financial incentives for quality work. The average McDonald's employee lasts about 3 months. I'm curious what that number would be if a franchise owner could pay $ 6 / hour when hired, but with a planned increase to $ 8 / hour at 3 months and $ 10 / hour at 6 months. It may also include some performance bonuses. Who knows where the correct starting salary is, what should be the timing and amount of raises and what might be the right incentives for performance? What works for one restaurant (even in the same company) is probably not suitable for another restaurant, and is almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! And it's almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! And it's almost certainly not suitable for someone who operates a car wash or landscaping service. Minimum wage laws also restrict entry to the market for low-skilled employees. If a business owner can only pay $ 6 / hour for a new hire and there are people willing to work at $ 6 / hour, then a law that requires them to be paid at $ 7.25 / hour means that they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! 25 / hour means they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary! 25 / hour means they are actually paid $ 0 / hour, because they don't hire you. Talk about an unfair salary!
  • CEOs, CFOs, Presidents, Vice Presidents, and all the other corporate baddies. Few people have such a complex salary structure as large corporate executives. There is a base salary. There are bonuses, both guaranteed and based on performance. There are common stock payments, but there are also stock options. Who determines how much the person is paid and how is that payment structured? These determinations are typically made by the company's board of directors, which often acts as a proxy voter for the shareholders. Ideally, those pay structures are geared towards company performance: CEOs win or lose while companies win or lose. If that's the setup, then your salary is pretty much justified, i.e. they are paid for the value they bring to businesses. Unfortunately, there are a lot of distortions here too. Stock value is often used as a proxy for other measures of company performance, so the focus of some executives is to manipulate the stock price, rather than creating a good product and competing well in the market ( Does anyone remember Enron?). Twisted performance incentives can also lead to shady corporate accounting and even fraudulent practices (hello again, Enron). The worst, however, is when large corporations achieve and maintain their "success" by securing political favors that allow them to force their competitors or issue large salaries without actually producing anything of value (ahem, Solyndra). I do not believe in the idea that all executives in large companies do not deserve their salaries. I just warn that there are enough bad players on the market,
  • Professional athletes. Of all the examples I give here, professional athletes may actually have salaries that are the closest reflection of their market value. Certainly there are some distortions, for example, different leagues have requirements for a benchmark minimum wage. There are also some significant distortions in the way owners can finance those wages; I have a particular problem with the notion that taxpayers are hooked on building arenas / stadiums in most circumstances. But, if you look at the contract between the player and his employer, there are many market forces at play. See Also - John Nagel's Answer to Why Major League Athletes Make So Much Money

What is the first thing I should do when I get a high paying job?

I live, work and contract in the United States. This answer comes from that perspective.

Congratulations on the new job. There are many things that you will need to worry about, but this is what I think you should do and in what order.

  1. Celebrate! Have a nice dinner or something!
  2. Employee benefits. Remember that you generally have a certain amount of time to research your benefit options as a new hire before you lose your chance to sign up. Research these things, then sign up. If you are eligible to participate in a savings plan, please do so
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What is the first thing I should do when I get a high paying job?

I live, work and contract in the United States. This answer comes from that perspective.

Congratulations on the new job. There are many things that you will need to worry about, but this is what I think you should do and in what order.

  1. Celebrate! Have a nice dinner or something!
  2. Employee benefits. Remember that you generally have a certain amount of time to research your benefit options as a new hire before you lose your chance to sign up. Research these things, then sign up. If you are eligible to participate in a savings plan, do so now and participate as much as you are rewarded for participating.
  3. Pay your consumer debt, if applicable. Increase your payments as much as you can. This is a great way to improve your credit score.
  4. Find out when you want to take your vacation. If you are coming in the middle of the year or later, in most places you will need to get approval for when you can use it, and everyone else on the team already has their approved schedule. Find out your preferred dates and alternative options before consulting with your manager.

It depends on the expectations that the boss has left you.

If the blue suits just sat around the cigar bar pimping the sun on each other's legs and came up with an unfounded blue sky plan with targets pulled from their behinds, they've set you up for a downfall. If (when) their coccameme plan goes wrong, they will want to blame someone and that someone will be you.

I would be very cautious in accepting this job. Talk to your mentor. Do a little market research on your own. Research the people offering this job.

Don't be a fool, a scapegoat or a fool. Ask yourself this question: Yes

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It depends on the expectations that the boss has left you.

If the blue suits just sat around the cigar bar pimping the sun on each other's legs and came up with an unfounded blue sky plan with targets pulled from their behinds, they've set you up for a downfall. If (when) their coccameme plan goes wrong, they will want to blame someone and that someone will be you.

I would be very cautious in accepting this job. Talk to your mentor. Do a little market research on your own. Research the people offering this job.

Don't be a fool, a scapegoat or a fool. Ask yourself this question: If I came up with this idea on my own, would I really want to do it with a fire in my stomach, or would I just put it on the shelf as an idea that seemed good at first but the research said I was shaky and doubtful?

-Thomas-

When it's right for you, for example, if you need the money.

No one can decide that for you. There is nothing wrong with wanting to be able to afford nicer things for your family and being willing to work harder to get it. Likewise, there is nothing wrong with not chasing after money and showing loyalty to a good manager.

The higher-paying position is more likely to pay off if it provides more prospects for your career, for example, more prospects for promotion, or if it gives you the means to promote your own plans in some way that the current job does not.

One final thought: if you move to a much higher salary like

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When it's right for you, for example, if you need the money.

No one can decide that for you. There is nothing wrong with wanting to be able to afford nicer things for your family and being willing to work harder to get it. Likewise, there is nothing wrong with not chasing after money and showing loyalty to a good manager.

The higher-paying position is more likely to pay off if it provides more prospects for your career, for example, more prospects for promotion, or if it gives you the means to promote your own plans in some way that the current job does not.

One final thought: if you move to a much higher salary like this, try to avoid increasing your expenses to create a buffer; Having this type of jump is the point where it is usually easiest to start saving significantly more. Such a reserve will give you more options if you feel the need to lower your salary again (either for a comfortable job or just a break between roles). Maybe that should be 50% of the extra to take home; after all, you want a short-term reward for your career change.

It depends on your values ​​and therefore the metrics you live by. But be careful here that you've really thought about your values ​​and the metrics you've set for yourself. The following are the metrics that I have established for myself:

  1. Is the work meaningful and purposeful? Am I adding value to the lives of others and by doing so creating satisfaction in my own?
  2. Am I still challenged? I'm growing? Or am I not growing or worse still regressing?
  3. Have I limited myself to the employer? Hit the glass ceiling?
  4. How is the company doing? Well, or are they in a downtrend that is more likely to continue?

My metrics

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It depends on your values ​​and therefore the metrics you live by. But be careful here that you've really thought about your values ​​and the metrics you've set for yourself. The following are the metrics that I have established for myself:

  1. Is the work meaningful and purposeful? Am I adding value to the lives of others and by doing so creating satisfaction in my own?
  2. Am I still challenged? I'm growing? Or am I not growing or worse still regressing?
  3. Have I limited myself to the employer? Hit the glass ceiling?
  4. How is the company doing? Well, or are they in a downtrend that is more likely to continue?

I admit that my metrics are rather focused on "me". But I don't focus on money (not that I don't care) or atmosphere (like company culture); I want to be challenged and I want to grow. My theory is that if those things don't happen consistently, you are not very likely to grow in the organization and you may want to check your options. Don't let comfort or complacency stop you. Strive to feel uncomfortable in a kind of growth.

Again, these are my metrics / values, you can choose the ones that are suitable for you because you are the main authority on yourself.

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