Should I quit my job?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Matilda Anderson



Should I quit my job?

First of all, this question requires a bit of context. The problem with your question is that it is too vague. I would start by broadening the question to give people a better idea of ​​where you are. Without that context, you will receive vague or unhelpful advice.

With that said, there are a few things you can do to determine if you should quit your job. For one thing, do you have a financial track record to keep quitting your job? If not, do you have another job or your own business ready to replace your income? These are probably the most important things to consider

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First of all, this question requires a bit of context. The problem with your question is that it is too vague. I would start by broadening the question to give people a better idea of ​​where you are. Without that context, you will receive vague or unhelpful advice.

With that said, there are a few things you can do to determine if you should quit your job. For one thing, do you have a financial track record to keep quitting your job? If not, do you have another job or your own business ready to replace your income? These are probably the most important things to consider before quitting your job altogether.

Second, you must ask yourself why you are quitting your job. There are definitely valid reasons to quit your job. You may find it soul-sucking, unwell, insecure, unappreciated, or whatever. You must ask yourself if these things are reason enough to quit smoking.

Also, are you quitting just because? Are you in the habit of quitting or changing jobs to find the "perfect" job? These are not good reasons to quit smoking.

Ultimately, it really is up to you. Without knowing your situation, it is impossible to give you solid or specific advice. The best we can do is make you think about your situation. Next time, ask a better question and you'll be surprised at how much better the advice is.

I have 2 questions:

1) Why do you want to quit smoking?

2) Are you looking for another job or want to start your own business?

In general, if you want to quit because the environment is toxic, the job is dangerous, or something that harms your life or well-being, then yes, quit and don't look back.

Just understand that quitting without a plan can be just as stressful.

But, if you want to quit because the pay is low, you hate the job, or other valid but not vital reasons, then you wouldn't quit until you have another job waiting or you can replace your current income with another.

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I have 2 questions:

1) Why do you want to quit smoking?

2) Are you looking for another job or want to start your own business?

In general, if you want to quit because the environment is toxic, the job is dangerous, or something that harms your life or well-being, then yes, quit and don't look back.

Just understand that quitting without a plan can be just as stressful.

But, if you want to quit because the pay is low, you hate the job, or other valid but not vital reasons, then you wouldn't quit until you have another job ready or you can replace your current income with another. source. In other words, don't give up without an escape plan!

Most people do not have the second source of income, and if you are like most people, it would not be good to quit smoking.

But how would you know when it would be time to quit because you started a side hustle or something?

Well, if you have what I call the "5 rights," then you can quit with confidence.

These are:

The right business model (a way to earn money that will support your lifestyle)

The right habits (what do you do every day to ensure success in everything you do?)

Proper logistics (you have enough savings, a retirement plan outside of your job, medical / dental insurance without a job, etc.)

The right skills (do you have marketing and sales skills?)

The right mindset (if you have self-limiting thoughts or think and act like an employee, you won't make it)

So think carefully about why you want to do what you plan to do and see if it makes sense.

It depends?..

In fact, I was the one who started his business AFTER I quit a job, BUT I AM PREPARING for my future business, both mentally and doing my research, while I have still been working for someone else. In fact, I built my website, as a business card and as a visualization medium for my dream, while working on my day job.

But I have also seen people LEAVE their jobs JUST BECAUSE they hated it, and simply because they WANTED TO LEAVE, with no definite plans for their future business. These stories rarely end well: because while you figure out what you want

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It depends?..

In fact, I was the one who started his business AFTER I quit a job, BUT I AM PREPARING for my future business, both mentally and doing my research, while I have still been working for someone else. In fact, I built my website, as a business card and as a visualization medium for my dream, while working on my day job.

But I have also seen people LEAVE their jobs JUST BECAUSE they hated it, and simply because they WANTED TO LEAVE, with no definite plans for their future business. These stories rarely end well: because as you figure out what you want to do, time passes, the spirit and energy drift away, and you end up without the spirit, energy, and most importantly, money. What if you have family responsibilities, if you have a family to feed? This is something that CANNOT be allowed to happen.

Here are some other thoughts I have on the subject:

DON'T LEAVE YOUR DAILY JOB - BUILD A 5 TO 9 INSTEAD

So what would you recommend doing? ...

You have your exit plan and are preparing for your post-quit situation:

  • Will it be a better (new) job? Make sure you have a job offer BEFORE you quit.
  • Will it be a new business? Make sure you have some savings, passive income, part-time work, your spouse's salary, etc., and a CLEAR business plan before you quit.

With that said, I wish you the best of luck and make your choice wisely.

Hi !

I am no one to tell you what to do and what not to do. Given the impact this decision could have on your career, I'll just share my thoughts on it, which might give you a different perspective.

I entered my current organization through on-campus placement. Looking ahead, life stopped. Devastated to the core knowing the kind of life this IT has to offer. So it wasn't me. I'm certainly not cut out for a sedentary lifestyle. Life suddenly turned black and white.

2 years of medical science high school (even though I didn't land in an amazing college, I tried hard) + 4 years of college for

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Hi !

I am no one to tell you what to do and what not to do. Given the impact this decision could have on your career, I'll just share my thoughts on it, which might give you a different perspective.

I entered my current organization through on-campus placement. Looking ahead, life stopped. Devastated to the core knowing the kind of life this IT has to offer. So it wasn't me. I'm certainly not cut out for a sedentary lifestyle. Life suddenly turned black and white.

2 years of medical science high school (even though I didn't land in an amazing college, I pushed myself) + 4 years of college to finally land HERE? Seriously ? Stuck butt in an adjustable chair for 9 long hours? He was cursing me for walking blindly down the path.

The gain was a balm for the injury. I didn't quit my job. Also, I started preparing for the MBA like any frustrated engineer. I failed miserably. (87th percentile score, too low to go to a good high school.) Shattered once more.

I joined dance classes, started working on my fitness sincerely. I recently participated in a beauty pageant organized by Gladrags and was a finalist at the North Indian level. Euphoric! My dry bag of achievements suddenly perked up. Now I work as a model for a clothing brand. Once again, I did not quit my job.

My hunger is not yet satisfied. I will keep trying different things. What is the maximum that can happen? You will fail, right? Certainly better than not trying. You can fail me, but you can never stop me from working hard, from paving my own path, from being an uncompromising learner.

So while I'm on this journey called self-hunting, I certainly need to work hard. But I won't quit until I'm done with this other 'build'.

What keeps me going? 'I'm not done yet, imagine abi baki ha mere dost'!

Thanks!

Edited.

I understand your situation.

I think if you can find another job, which I think you can, you should quit this one. Why?

Because you said yourself that you didn't like the nature of the job.
You mentioned pressure too, but that's something you'll find everywhere, but it's important to do what you love or at least not do something you don't like unless and until there is some important reason, but that's a different story.

Since you are already working here and the conditions are not good, I suggest you find one soon and leave it alone after you have another job in hand.

When work is a

Keep reading

Edited.

I understand your situation.

I think if you can find another job, which I think you can, you should quit this one. Why?

Because you said yourself that you didn't like the nature of the job.
You mentioned pressure too, but that's something you'll find everywhere, but it's important to do what you love or at least not do something you don't like unless and until there is some important reason, but that's a different story.

Since you are already working here and the conditions are not good, I suggest you find one soon and leave it alone after you have another job in hand.

When work is a pleasure, life is a joy! When work is a duty, life is slavery.

-Maxim Gorky

Edit 1: reply to your comment.

Money can buy many things.
But as the saying goes, money cannot buy happiness.
If you've ever earned a job that pays well and has brand equity, then you'd better find one again, but try to find one with better working conditions.
Good luck.

If your previous role is related to sales, then it is not a good idea to quit.
if not, then it's okay to go out.
Before giving the offer, the HR / unit manager would have told you what was expected of you. I mean target sales pressure.

Otherwise, I assume they assumed that you are the right choice for their business unit after interviewing you or that you are already a sales professional.
don't quit too soon.

If it's your first job, I have to assume you didn't do your homework on sales job-related stress.
If I am you, I would go to train on the weekends on sale.
it is learnable. such courses are aff

Keep reading

If your previous role is related to sales, then it is not a good idea to quit.
if not, then it's okay to go out.
Before giving the offer, the HR / unit manager would have told you what was expected of you. I mean target sales pressure.

Otherwise, I assume they assumed that you are the right choice for their business unit after interviewing you or that you are already a sales professional.
don't quit too soon.

If it's your first job, I have to assume you didn't do your homework on sales job-related stress.
If I am you, I would go to train on the weekends on sale.
it is learnable. these courses are affordable.

or use udemy. I even signed up for a free sales course on udemy because I wanted to learn about sales.
I am a technical guy but I always wanted to learn sales.

This link as shown below is not affiliated with me nor is it an affiliate link.
hence it does not benefit me.
But Brain Tracy is a world-class sales coach.

http://www.briantracy.com/sales_training/products.aspx

go through the link above to get an idea on the material available for sales training.
Sign up for a free udemy sales training course.

I would start by quoting,

'You have to close a door to open another with more and greater opportunities'

I can understand that this can be one of the most difficult decisions of your life because leaving a job is not an easy matter. You start to think about many things like if you will get a better company or what others will think of you, how will you survive without making money, what would happen if you get a less paid job, etc.

All of these thoughts are natural, but honestly, this is not what you should be concerned about. There are many in this area but if you are not satisfied with the work you are doing

Keep reading

I would start by quoting,

'You have to close a door to open another with more and greater opportunities'

I can understand that this can be one of the most difficult decisions of your life because leaving a job is not an easy matter. You start to think about many things like if you will get a better company or what others will think of you, how will you survive without making money, what would happen if you get a less paid job, etc.

All of these thoughts are natural, but honestly, this is not what you should be concerned about. There are many in such a boundary, but if you are not satisfied with the work you are doing, if you are not enjoying it and it does not make you feel good about yourself, then surely you should think about taking another turn in your life. Only you have to think about your happiness. And only when you are happy and satisfied, you can radiate it. Orelse you will always be moody and wherever you go you will take your sadness with you and that will never let you really enjoy anything, and in the process you could lose yourself.

So let me remind you that you only have one life and you need to use it to feel better and not bitter. I can assure you that you will figure things out once you leave. Things will fall into place. Don't worry ... just make that decision yourself.

Keep happy :)

I think if you can afford to quit your job and go for your dream, do it. Everything is a question of finances. You have to eat while chasing your dream. I always encourage people to pursue their passion because you spend so much of your adult life working. If you can do your passion, it's not really a job, it's nice. If you need income while studying, look for another job before leaving your existing one. For whatever reason, it seems more marketable when currently employed. When you leave, give them notice and leave them smiling, you never know when you may need a job reference.

Keep reading

I think if you can afford to quit your job and go for your dream, do it. Everything is a question of finances. You have to eat while chasing your dream. I always encourage people to pursue their passion because you spend so much of your adult life working. If you can do your passion, it's not really a job, it's nice. If you need income while studying, look for another job before leaving your existing one. For whatever reason, it seems more marketable when currently employed. When you leave, give notice and leave them smiling, you never know when you may need a job reference.

Good luck. I hope everything works out for you!

Well this question used to come to my mind when I hadn't gotten the right job or wasn't sure what I wanted, which I realized shortly after a couple of mistakes as I had no one to advise or forum as a quora, so if this question comes to mind for the above reason or for any other reason; First, get exact clarity on why you want to quit. It might be very convenient to make this decision now, as you may have enough financial backing and can survive without it later, but any impulsive decision can have a long-term impact, whether you give your funders control.

Keep reading

Well this question used to come to my mind when I hadn't gotten the right job or wasn't sure what I wanted, which I realized shortly after a couple of mistakes as I had no one to advise or forum as a quora, so if this question comes to mind for the above reason or for any other reason; First, get exact clarity on why you want to quit. It can be very convenient to make this decision now, as you may have enough financial backing and can survive without it later on, but any impulsive decision can have a long-term impact, either by giving your control to your funders who may be your parents or just taking it. easy it can affect your career in your future.

So think and then plan if it's okay to quit long-term!

I do not understand your question.

If your question was: Should I look for another job? So the answer is obviously yes.

But no, you shouldn't quit your job now, if you haven't found another job. You should look for another job, and when you have a new job, quit this one.

That is the order of operations. Find a new job first, then quit.

Never the other way around.

Employers want to hire someone who is currently working. They don't want to hire someone who just quit without having a new job ready.

First of all, I am sorry to hear that your current job is not working. You definitely need to take some time to determine what aspects of the job are not to your liking. An MS may not help your long-term career goals if you are put back in the same environment.
All that said, a letter of recommendation (LOR) is a strange thing to expect ... where I live, if a prospective employer contacts a previous employer, they can only legally confirm the employment start and end dates, not the reasons for separation, salary, etc. If you wanted a letter or something you would

Keep reading

First of all, I am sorry to hear that your current job is not working. You definitely need to take some time to determine what aspects of the job are not to your liking. An MS may not help your long-term career goals if you are put back in the same environment.
All that said, a letter of recommendation (LOR) is a strange thing to expect ... where I live, if a prospective employer contacts a previous employer, they can only legally confirm the employment start and end dates, not the reasons for separation, salary, etc. If you wanted a letter or some kind, you'd have to get it from your manager while you're still employed ... and it would be a pretty clear message to your manager that you were considering quitting. Where I live, letters of recommendation have more to do with letters from educators to future employers, not from previous employers to future employers.

Good luck!

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