Should I quit my job and go on a trip for 5 months? I am 23 years old and have 2 years of experience in my field.

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Casey Workman



Should I quit my job and go on a trip for 5 months? I am 23 years old and have 2 years of experience in my field.

At 25 I quit my job in London. He moved to Asia for less money. A year later he moved again to a tropical island for less money.

2 years later I did an MBA in France.

The following year he returned to Asia traveling a lot for the company.

Two years later he moved to India in a senior position.

2 years plus expatriate to London and Stockholm.

1 year later he sold the company for US $ 100M and joined the Government.

Since then quite stable.

So 11 years of travel while paying.

That is what I recommend.

At this time in the middle of the Covid-19 outbreak when most things are closed and traveling is difficult?

No ... stay at work and wait for things to get back to normal.

No. Instead, go on a one-week vacation within a year of working for the company.

If you have absolutely no dependents, enjoy your youth because it does not last and later you will be (hopefully a responsible person) but now enjoy! And stay safe!

How about this:

  • Thailand - In Ko Pha Ngan I was beaten by Thai taxi drivers.
  • Thailand - In Bangkok my digital camera was stolen from a club 6 hours after buying it
  • Venezuela - In Caracas, police officers Deepak Shukla detained me at gunpoint in a van. - look here
  • Venezuela - In Caracas I stayed in a brothel the first night since it was the only place that was still open 'for clients'
  • Kosovo - In Prishtina I was extorted by a taxi driver when he took me to the only open shelter at 11pm. This was
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How about this:

  • Thailand - In Ko Pha Ngan I was beaten by Thai taxi drivers.
  • Thailand - In Bangkok my digital camera was stolen from a club 6 hours after buying it
  • Venezuela - In Caracas, police officers Deepak Shukla detained me at gunpoint in a van. - look here
  • Venezuela - In Caracas I stayed in a brothel the first night since it was the only place that was still open 'for clients'
  • Kosovo - In Prishtina I was extorted by a taxi driver when he took me to the only open shelter at 11pm. This was after being smuggled across the border from Serbia. I was alone. I was only 18 years old.
  • India - In Goa, a man who befriended me at a resort stole my camera and all my money when I went to buy a bus ticket to Poona. When I returned to the hotel I had fled
  • India - In Delhi I paid a police officer $ 150 USD after he stopped me when he realized I was English and saw £ £ £ signs
  • Brazil -In Rio I tried to withdraw £ 300 x 2 from the ATM. I never received the money but the bank 'recorded the transaction'
  • Bolivia - The border - I tried to bribe a border officer with $ 20 USD to let me cross the border with my expired visa. They took my Swiss friend and I off the bus we were on, took our passports and locked us in a room. That's when he started to get hairy. Let's say I'm not allowed to go back to Bolivia
  • Colombia - In Cartagena, a couple and I were detained at knife point in exchange for cash. We ran
  • Italy - In Turin - My backpack with my Macbook Pro, iPad Air and Kindle was stolen while I was registering to go to London. I did not get on the plane
  • South Africa - In Johannesburg - I missed my connecting flight to Doha because I was having Indian and watching a YouTube documentary. Paid $ 900 USD for a direct flight to London
  • Slovakia - In Bratislava I went to a pub drunk with 10 other people from my hostel. I was about to walk in when the 20-year-old shaved-headed Caucasian men wearing the same shirts and boots looked at me and smiled softly. 'You shouldn't go in'. I did not do it
  • Australia - Somewhere on the East Coast: I stopped in a God-forsaken city and missed my "outbound bus." I had to sleep on a bench at a gas station 24 hours waiting for the next
  • New Zealand - Somewhere on the South Island - The caravan we were driving in broke down in a remote village. The locals had never seen a British Indian. They let me know
  • (I could continue). If you want me to write it in the comments: p

I'm going to continue:

  • Prishtina - Kosovo: When crossing the border at midnight in an empty coach, I was the ONLY person going from Serbia to Kosovo. Then, upon arrival, he was asked 'why are you here?'
  • Argentina - Buenos Aires: Settling in the shelter (during the World Cup) only for a man who had been attacked to enter, and then he would tell us about his friend who had been hit with a motorcycle helmet. Tell us in a taxi driving all night looking for it
  • Barcelona - Spain: I lost my check-in for my 'stowaway' luggage after flying just to get a tattoo. Then I decided to go live in Lausanne instead of Amsterdam, since my partner was there. I got on a plane 4 hours later


But would I do it again?

Traveling that is ...

Every time

I have done this 4 times. Once in Europe, in the late 90's, in Asia in 2009 and now I'm in Portugal planning a trip to Africa.

The big obstacle is getting off the hamster wheel. Most of us are convinced that if we take time off to travel, there will be great consequences for our career. That is the most frequent excuse I hear. So you have to agree not to move forward for a while. In fact, the last time I traveled I ended up teaching in Thailand and then I found the best job I have ever had. So taking chances like this can pay off. Also, being fired or between contracts is

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I have done this 4 times. Once in Europe, in the late 90's, in Asia in 2009 and now I'm in Portugal planning a trip to Africa.

The big obstacle is getting off the hamster wheel. Most of us are convinced that if we take time off to travel, there will be great consequences for our career. That is the most frequent excuse I hear. So you have to agree not to move forward for a while. In fact, the last time I traveled I ended up teaching in Thailand and then I found the best job I have ever had. So taking chances like this can pay off. Also, getting laid off or between contracts is a great time to start a travel adventure. It can also go terribly wrong. More on that later.

After committing to getting off the hamster wheel for a while, you need to find out what your budget is, as this will determine how long you can travel and where you can travel. Depending on where you are in the world, a bed will cost anywhere from $ 5 to $ 50 a night. Hostels are your friends. It is the best way to meet people when you travel and, as I almost always travel, it is the way to go. If you travel with friends, the expenses will be lower and you will have to negotiate many things. You should not only take into account the cost of a bed, but also the cost of transportation, food, and entertainment. Not drinking alcohol is a great way to save money. Historically, you would only drink beer if it was the same price as other options.

Where to go? Europe is expensive, as is the United States. Central America, South America, Southeast Asia, and Africa are more affordable. As long as you stick to your budget. Eastern Europe used to be a bargain but I haven't been there in 20 years so ...

Another thing to keep in mind, when you are calculating your budget, do not forget to include the bills that you need to pay at home. If you can sublet your place, it might work, but I'd rather sell most, if not all of my stuff, and get rid of my place before I go on a trip. It is also helpful to be debt free before traveling. It wouldn't make much sense to go on a trip if you had a car + ins. payments, a mortgage (unless you can rent your place), or credit card debt to pay off.

Research and planning follow. Usually I don't know how long I'll be away and just a general idea of ​​where I want to go. I start with a list of highlights and fix them, and my plans change often. If you are booking flights, you will have to work hard to get the cheapest ones. You will need to know your average daily expenses, transportation cost, allow for occasional waste, and emergency funds. You will also need to purchase travel insurance before you leave. The purchase of travel insurance is not optional. I have known several people who traveled without buying insurance, were seriously injured and had to return to the states, generating more than 150 thousand bills. Who is going to pay for this? Your friends and family, so don't go there.

Your research should include what time of year to go, for example, you probably don't want to go to a beach destination in the rainy season, and it is important to know what festivals or holidays are happening, as in many places this can happen. it means a complete shutdown of almost everything. Also, cheap accommodations may be closed out of season, although it is generally cheaper to go out of season and the crowds will be less. It's probably a good idea to also look at the political climate.

Now that you have accepted that getting off the hamster wheel is fine, you are on a budget, and you should have a rough idea of ​​where you want to go and when.

So let's talk about when things can go terribly wrong. Not having travel insurance and getting seriously ill or injured is at the top of the list. I had to have an emergency splenectomy in Thailand after a minor scooter accident, it would have cost me 5K if I had no insurance. Then there is poor planning and not following your budget, which can lead you to be on the other side of the world and know what to take home, pay attention to your bank balance and your daily spending! Scams are everywhere and most of them won't cost you a lot of money or time. Part of your research is reading about scams in the places you will go, although I was scammed when I fully know what the scams were, some of the scammers are that good. Some of the scams can get you in serious trouble, jail, or death, but they are rare. I ended up in a high stakes game of poker by mistake and the pot hit 20k. I was gambling with someone else's money and I managed to get out of that very bad situation with only losing $ 150. It could have been much, much worse. There are pickpockets and thieves, when traveling to 36 countries, once a camera was stolen and that was it. I only felt physically unsafe once. But on rare occasions, people are injured and killed as a result of violence, but if you live in the United States, the chances of random violence are higher, so I don't worry about that. One last thing, if you are a woman traveling alone, you should know that the place you are traveling to is safe for you. India and Turkey are two places I have been that are not ideal for single women. I was gambling with someone else's money and I managed to get out of that very bad situation with only losing $ 150. It could have been much, much worse. There are pickpockets and thieves, when traveling to 36 countries, once a camera was stolen and that was it. I only felt physically unsafe once. But on rare occasions, people are injured and killed as a result of violence, but if you live in the United States, the chances of random violence are higher, so I don't worry about that. One last thing, if you are a woman traveling alone, you should know that the place you are traveling to is safe for you. India and Turkey are two places I have been that are not ideal for single women. I was gambling with someone else's money and I managed to get out of that very bad situation with only losing $ 150. It could have been much, much worse. There are pickpockets and thieves, when traveling to 36 countries, once a camera was stolen and that was it. I only felt physically unsafe once. But on rare occasions, people are injured and killed as a result of violence, but if you live in the United States, the chances of random violence are higher, so I don't worry about that. One last thing, if you are a woman traveling alone, you should know that the place you are traveling to is safe for you. India and Turkey are two places I have been that are not ideal for single women. Traveling to 36 countries, a camera was stolen from me once and that was it. I only felt physically unsafe once. But on rare occasions, people are injured and die as a result of violence, but if you live in the United States, the chances of random violence are higher, so I don't worry about that. One last thing, if you are a woman traveling alone, you should know that the place you are traveling to is safe for you. India and Turkey are two places I have been that are not ideal for single women. Traveling to 36 countries, a camera was stolen from me once and that was it. I only felt physically unsafe once. But on rare occasions, people are injured and killed as a result of violence, but if you live in the United States, the chances of random violence are higher, so I don't worry about that. One last thing, if you are a woman traveling alone, you should know that the place you are traveling to is safe for you. India and Turkey are two places I have been that are not ideal for single women. you need to know that the place you are traveling to is safe for you. India and Turkey are two places I have been that are not ideal for single women. you need to know that the place you are traveling to is safe for you. India and Turkey are two places I have been that are not ideal for single women.

Now is the time to commit. Make a plan to: notify at work, deal with your life situation, sell or store your things, buy transportation to your first destination. Also make sure your preliminary travel plan is in place and you're ready to modify it as you meet people and get new ideas.

So:
1. Be willing to get off the hamster wheel
2. Make a budget
3. Calculate where you want to go and approximately how long
4. Create a plan / timeline to get your butt on a plane (train, bus)
5. Execute !

The highlights of some of my travels can be found here:
eatinglightbulbs.com

Hello, daydreaming in your daily work!

First of all, congratulations on landing your dream job, it's a great achievement! Maybe that job was just what you needed for the last era of your life, but you long for a new challenge. So, I wouldn't say "you should have traveled" then, but you can start looking at your career and life with a new perspective now.

You have 5 years of great experience and it seems that you have really gotten to know the field in which you find yourself. It may have seemed tedious to get to this point, but it means that you now have some business skills. So you have

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Hello, daydreaming in your daily work!

First of all, congratulations on landing your dream job, it's a great achievement! Maybe that job was just what you needed for the last era of your life, but you long for a new challenge. So, I wouldn't say "you should have traveled" then, but you can start looking at your career and life with a new perspective now.

You have 5 years of great experience and it seems that you have really gotten to know the field in which you find yourself. It may have seemed tedious to get to this point, but it means that you now have some business skills. So you have a couple of different routes that you can take. I will outline them from the safest to the most daring!

  1. You can first try to fall in love with your current job again. After all, you had a hot romance at one point! So how can you spice it up again? Here are some ideas. Is there a project you can undertake that pushes you beyond your comfort zone? Are there any barriers or challenges in the workplace that have always bothered you that you might face (I was bored in a position and decided to address equity for Native American clients in our programming)? More simply, can you change your daily office habits? This could include where you sit, what you eat for lunch, and, perhaps most effectively, what you do with your breaks and free time. Try doing yoga during your break,
  2. Since you have a good handle on your industry, why not take a higher position? This could mean seeking upward mobility at your company or looking for work at another company. Perhaps this is an opportunity for you to move to a new place and go at a new pace.
  3. If you're ready to ditch it all and try something completely new, why not look for an international job or self-employment that allows you to travel? When wanderlust hits, here's an article on how to conduct an international job search. There are also many posts that you can do remotely; try using our search to find remote placement jobs you might have while traveling. Depending on your skill set, you may be more or less capable of being a freelancer (I worked as a freelancer with Mentat while traveling in Guatemala!), But that is becoming one more option in just about any field.

No matter what you choose, your life path has not been and will not be a mistake. When you listen to your instincts, trust your experience and keep your eyes open, you will know that this path is preparing you for some beautiful adventures and some lessons that have yet to be learned.

The best of luck to you! Feel free to write to Mentat for more ideas or visit our resources page.

It's okay to quit a job at any time if it's for the right reasons. Most of the time I think they are not the right reasons. People just don't try to improve the current situation enough, feeling that "it will never change."

Here are some reasons and my opinion on each one:

  • You found something better: I don't think it's a good reason. There are always better jobs out there. I am an employer, if I see that you left a previous job for something better 6 months later, I suppose you will do the same with me, and we invest too much in our people to risk that.
  • the trip was terrible - that's a good reason, but if the
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It's okay to quit a job at any time if it's for the right reasons. Most of the time I think they are not the right reasons. People just don't try to improve the current situation enough, feeling that "it will never change."

Here are some reasons and my opinion on each one:

  • You found something better: I don't think it's a good reason. There are always better jobs out there. I am an employer, if I see that you left a previous job for something better 6 months later, I suppose you will do the same with me, and we invest too much in our people to risk that.
  • the commute was terrible - that's a good reason, but if that's really the reason, then you shouldn't have taken the job in the first place. Don't make it a habit.
  • Your boss is petty - only good reason if you've completely exhausted yourself trying to fix things at the current job first. Talk to other people, go to your boss's boss, etc.
  • you want to try something else: okay, but future employers might label you impulsive or "fickle." Avoid making it a habit.
  • you're bored: usually not a good reason. There are periods of boredom in many jobs. Be sure to actively communicate your feelings to your current boss or company, and explain that your motivation is waning because you feel like work is boring and you want help fixing it. If they don't help, it is understandable that they will leave.
  • you're exhausted - usually not a good reason. Setting limits is important. If they told you “good work-life balance” and didn't keep that promise, mention your concerns. Don't say "you lied to me", just say "I'm exhausted". - If they don't help fix it, it's okay to leave.
  • Accepted additional work due to layoffs - Generally not a good reason to leave as long as you get some kind of recognition in compensation or accelerated promotional opportunities. They probably won't say anything, you will probably have to ask about it. Management is likely dealing with large and stressful elements such as business viability or the impact of layoffs on their customers or profitability. Just sit down with them and talk.
  • are not you happy. It's not a good reason to leave, UNLESS you've sat down with people (coworkers, manager, founder) and asked for their help with this. If they can't help you, it's okay for you to go.
  • You feel like there is no room to move forward It is not a good reason to leave any time soon. Discuss the deadline with your manager. Things change, pandemics change the landscape, companies have to adjust or rotate or adapt to an unclear environment. Progress is important, but unemployment can be brutal. You could easily walk away for a better title, salary, etc., and then lose that job.
  • you don't feel valued or appreciated. It's not a reason to leave unless you've discussed it with your manager and haven't seen any changes in months. Give them a chance to make things better!

Leaving is easy. Improving things where you are is more difficult, but often better in the long run.

Just do it, but make sure you have a good backup plan. I was an employee like you, a year ago. I worked in an established interior design studio for a month and a half before realizing I wasn't cut out for the job. One day I decided to quit my job, but I wasn't sure how to do it. I told my dad about my decision and, to my surprise, he was very supportive. He said: "If you really think you can survive without a regular 9 to 5 job, then you can. However, you need a plan B. Don't quit a high paying job blindly because you might end up regretting that decision for the

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Just do it, but make sure you have a good backup plan. I was an employee like you, a year ago. I worked in an established interior design studio for a month and a half before realizing I wasn't cut out for the job. One day I decided to quit my job, but I wasn't sure how to do it. I told my dad about my decision and, to my surprise, he was very supportive. He said, "If you really think you can survive without a regular 9 to 5 job, then you can. However, you need a plan B. Don't quit a high paying job blindly because you might end up regretting that decision for the rest of the time. his life ".
I quit my job two weeks later and used my salary to move out of my parents' house. I ventured into business online, knowing that the only option I had was to succeed.
Well, here I am at 23, advising you whether or not you should quit your job. I have worked hard in less than a year to reach the level where I earn much more than in my previous job. Actually, I realized that it would have taken me 20 months (as an employee) to do what I earned last month.

I am happy. Yes. It was worth it? Yes. Were you 100% sure it would turn out that well? No.
Look, my baby buddy from 1994, you just have to get rid of the noises in your head and do it. There is no better life than one of satisfaction and freedom.
P.S. Prepare yourself psychologically for this is going to be a bumpy ride.
I wish you the best.

I could answer this more appropriately. I am also a student like you, maybe a little older since I am graduating this year from a not so good university. I have been working for a startup for 2 years as a part time employee and I enjoy it. There are some pros and some cons. Let me start with the cons.

CONS:
1. Sometimes I miss outings with my friends that I used to hate.

That's it, this is the only problem I had, which now doesn't bother me much. Now let's get to the pros.

PROS:
1. Work with bright people who have great problem solving skills. I learn

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I could answer this more appropriately. I am also a student like you, maybe a little older since I am graduating this year from a not so good university. I have been working for a startup for 2 years as a part time employee and I enjoy it. There are some pros and some cons. Let me start with the cons.

CONS:
1. Sometimes I miss outings with my friends that I used to hate.

That's it, this is the only problem I had, which now doesn't bother me much. Now let's get to the pros.

PROS:
1. Work with bright people who have great problem solving skills. I learned to divide a problem into small units that can be solved.
2. Learn new technologies. You never get out of date with technologies because you will constantly search and read the latest updates or frameworks that you can use to make your life easier. You will always be excited.
3. Learn to prioritize. However, this requires more time to master.
4. A look at the industry and how the life cycle of a product works. Before, I had only studied it as a theoretical subject.
5. Learn to comply less and more.
6. Learn several different tools for product management.
7. Be self-reliant. I haven't asked my dad for money since :)
8. Basically, he'll make connections to help him get a perfect job. My team leader recommended me to Amazon and now I have an offer.

If you quit, you will lose more than you learn in college. You will miss out on practical experience and believe me, questions like: what is the hardest mistake you have come across, what is the most challenging problem you have faced, can only be answered by experience.

Coming into their working life, startups are flexible. But remember to keep yourself a shock absorber. VERY IMPORTANT. If you can do something in 4 days, say it will take a week. This way you can divide your work evenly without altering your university schedules.
You can also request vacations when your college exams begin. If they are very strict about the holidays, usually not, let's say he will cover it next weekend.

Also try to keep the work you do strictly around 20 hours a week. Take it from a guy who has experience.

In many of my responses, I have made it clear that it is absolutely okay to leave a company if you feel poorly paid or think there is little room to learn.

But leaving a job in a month is unfair on many levels.

Show that you are not diligent enough when choosing a job. If you join a company and want to leave in a month, there should be something wrong with your health or there should be something illegal going on at the company.

If it is a large company like TCS, Infosys, where if a person leaves the job, it is relatively easy for the company to replace or accommodate.

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In many of my responses, I have made it clear that it is absolutely okay to leave a company if you feel poorly paid or think there is little room to learn.

But leaving a job in a month is unfair on many levels.

Show that you are not diligent enough when choosing a job. If you join a company and want to leave in a month, there should be something wrong with your health or there should be something illegal going on at the company.

If it is a large company like TCS, Infosys, where if a person leaves the job, it is relatively easy for the company to replace him or to accommodate his absence with other resources.

But for smaller businesses, where is that missing piece of the puzzle that they believe is necessary for their business to reach the next level. It is almost criminal.

Smaller companies and startups cannot afford to be strong in banking. So they hire taking into account the current projects, not the portfolio. You could have been the missing link in their planning, the gear wheel, the third leg of the tripod.

It will be extremely difficult for them to go through the hiring process again and hire a replacement.

So if you have to leave in a month. Be sure to help them find a suitable replacement, and if possible, work to help them fill the gap.

When I was 21, I grew 2.5 inches to my full adult height of 5'5 ”. It was so weird. But I'm glad I did! I hated being so short and I have a very tall family.

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