Should I learn HTML and CSS before jumping into JavaScript? Is there anything else I need to know before diving into this?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Harper Thompson



Should I learn HTML and CSS before jumping into JavaScript? Is there anything else I need to know before diving into this?

JavaScript is the only language I know of where it is presented as normal and reasonable for newcomers to learn both the language and an important API at the same time. If you want to get the basics down, learn JavaScript as a programming language first, and then tackle the DOM.

Familiarize yourself with the syntax and operations of JavaScript and use it to solve some basic programming problems like Project Euler. You can do all the output via console.log () without having to touch the DOM at all. Once you're comfortable with your basic JS skills, dive into HTML and CSS to familiarize yourself with the following:

HTML:

  • I know
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JavaScript is the only language I know of where it is presented as normal and reasonable for newcomers to learn both the language and an important API at the same time. If you want to get the basics down, learn JavaScript as a programming language first, and then tackle the DOM.

Familiarize yourself with the syntax and operations of JavaScript and use it to solve some basic programming problems like Project Euler. You can do all the output via console.log () without having to touch the DOM at all. Once you're comfortable with your basic JS skills, dive into HTML and CSS to familiarize yourself with the following:

HTML:

  • Semantic structure versus presentation
  • Document flow order / tree structure
  • The difference between block and inline elements


CSS:

  • Addressing elements with selectors
  • The box model
  • Float and clean


Then grab the DOM API. The methods that you will find there will be mainly related to the selection of elements and the manipulation of their appearance and content. To do that, you'll need to address them directly via CSS-like selectors or traverse the document tree, both of which should be familiar from the lists above.

The only other important piece you will need to learn is working with events. JavaScript within a browser (and within something like Node) is largely driven by a loop of events, waiting for something measurable to happen and then reacting to it. You will need to understand what events can be listened to, how to build callback functions to handle them, and how to bind those callbacks to DOM elements. Fortunately, if you've been familiar with selecting DOM elements and writing functions, you're well on your way to understanding callbacks and listeners.

You must learn CSS while learning HTML - it's a fundamental part of web pages and anyone who says you should learn it after everything else is sending you down the (wrong) path of mixing content and presentation. Javascript is often used to manipulate the page, so a fundamental part of that is understanding how styles influence the display of a web page.

So yes, learn HTML and CSS at least to the level where you understand how they integrate and impact each other. Then learn JavaScript without any framework, where you have to wrap the DOM nodes yourself, launch your own XmlHttpRequests, etc.

Fine

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You must learn CSS while learning HTML - it's a fundamental part of web pages and anyone who says you should learn it after everything else is sending you down the (wrong) path of mixing content and presentation. Javascript is often used to manipulate the page, so a fundamental part of that is understanding how styles influence the display of a web page.

So yes, learn HTML and CSS at least to the level where you understand how they integrate and impact each other. Then learn JavaScript without any framework, where you have to wrap the DOM nodes yourself, launch your own XmlHttpRequests, etc.

Finally, learn a couple of frameworks: JQuery, Dojo. An additional framework that I would suggest is Bootstrap, generally mixed with JQuery and now available for Dojo as well.

Once you have that part, you can look at the server-side JS - node.js with ExpressJS and Bootstrap and Angular. Of course, you will also need to access the databases, both RDBMS (MySQL) and NoSQL (Mongo, Couch, etc.).

At this point, you will be a badass web / JavaScript developer :-)

Always learn HTML first. JavaScript can be learned as a basic concept of programming languages. For example, if your main goal is to learn Java, you can start with JavaScript, as JavaScript is forgiving and gives you less of a headache with your language syntax. It is easier to learn and very quick and easy to see in action with the browser console.

However, if your end goal is to become a front-end developer or even back-end development, you should start with HTML, CSS and JavaScript in the same sequence, I would recommend it. If you try to start with JavaScript and when you encounter DOM manipulation using JavaSc

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Always learn HTML first. JavaScript can be learned as a basic concept of programming languages. For example, if your main goal is to learn Java, you can start with JavaScript, as JavaScript is forgiving and gives you less of a headache with your language syntax. It is easier to learn and very quick and easy to see in action with the browser console.

However, if your end goal is to become a front-end developer or even back-end development, you should start with HTML, CSS and JavaScript in the same sequence, I would recommend it. If you try to get started with JavaScript and when you come across DOM manipulation using JavaScript, it will be excruciatingly painful if you don't know HTML.

So the recommended flow is HTML → CSS → JavaScript → Backend Languages ​​(if you are interested).

Best of luck,

Piyush patel

These skills tend to complement each other. Learning just one will limit the projects you can work on and also make you dependent on other developers.

The first question to ask yourself is whether you want to be a back-end or front-end programmer. If you don't want to compromise at this stage, Javascript, which can do both, is a great bridging skill.

I suggest you then start with HTML, then CSS, and then Javascript; the progression here is smooth and will ensure that you are not stuck with new concepts early on.

Learning Javascript is also a good idea because it is really ho

Keep reading

These skills tend to complement each other. Learning just one will limit the projects you can work on and also make you dependent on other developers.

The first question to ask yourself is whether you want to be a back-end or front-end programmer. If you don't want to compromise at this stage, Javascript, which can do both, is a great bridging skill.

I suggest you then start with HTML, then CSS, and then Javascript; the progression here is smooth and will ensure that you are not stuck with new concepts early on.

Learning Javascript is also a good idea because it is very hot at the moment. Many of the new trending frameworks, such as node and angular, are based on Javascript. Once you learn these skills, you will really increase your earning potential, not to mention the possibilities of working on interesting business projects.

Javascript can be used on both server and client side. If you are talking about client-side development, then the order is a bit dependent. Although keep in mind that the actual concepts behind the knowledge of HTML / CSS have little overlap with Javascript. The way I have taught in the past has been in this order which is very pragmatic. Start with something you want to build (for example, an Todo app):

  1. HTML basics (you need something on the page to manipulate)
  2. Code interactions in raw JavaScript
  3. Create a second version using jQuery
  4. Create a third version using Backbone / AngularJS (optional)
  5. Learn some CSS. Go back and make it pretty.
Keep reading

Javascript can be used on both server and client side. If you are talking about client-side development, then the order is a bit dependent. Although keep in mind that the actual concepts behind the knowledge of HTML / CSS have little overlap with Javascript. The way I have taught in the past has been in this order which is very pragmatic. Start with something you want to build (for example, an Todo app):

  1. HTML basics (you need something on the page to manipulate)
  2. Code interactions in raw JavaScript
  3. Create a second version using jQuery
  4. Create a third version using Backbone / AngularJS (optional)
  5. Learn some CSS. Go back and make it pretty.

Most people can do this in about a week with no prior knowledge of any of these technologies.

I would say yes, to the basics of how HTML and CSS work. The vast majority of Javascript manipulates HTML and CSS, so if your intention is to learn some web programming, you should certainly be familiar with how the two work (not necessarily all the complexities, but the structure of everything). HTML and CSS are relatively easy to learn the basics, so you could do it pretty quickly.

JS can be learned just as a programming language like any other, but for your knowledge of JS to be truly fruitful, you will definitely need to understand how JS comes into play with the DOM. And for that, you need to know HTML and CSS.

It is easier to learn JS if you know HTML and CSS. There will be minor gaps in understanding during the learning phase as you will be able to see the big picture much more easily. It will create a deeper understanding of the concepts and IMO will be more effective than learning JS without the knowledge of HTML / CSS.

Only for HTML / CSS

  • Learn to Code HTML and CSS - by Shay Howe
  • WebPlatform.org: for reference.
  • Web Technology for Developers - Mozilla MDN

HTML5 specific

  • Immerse yourself in HTML5: to understand HTML5 correctly
  • HTML5 Doctor: for a deep understanding of HTML (5)
  • HTML5 is great! - For really advanced stuff in HTML5

JavaScript

  • JavaScript Garden: documentation on all the wacky parts of JavaScript
  • JS: The Right Way - If you are new to JS, this is a must read.
  • Superhero.js: a collection of the best resources for JavaScript

Google has launched Web Fundamentals recently. Items are very stubborn (intended to keep

Keep reading

Only for HTML / CSS

  • Learn to Code HTML and CSS - by Shay Howe
  • WebPlatform.org: for reference.
  • Web Technology for Developers - Mozilla MDN

HTML5 specific

  • Immerse yourself in HTML5: to understand HTML5 correctly
  • HTML5 Doctor: for a deep understanding of HTML (5)
  • HTML5 is great! - For really advanced stuff in HTML5

JavaScript

  • JavaScript Garden: documentation on all the wacky parts of JavaScript
  • JS: The Right Way - If you are new to JS, this is a must read.
  • Superhero.js: a collection of the best resources for JavaScript

Google has launched Web Fundamentals recently. The articles have many opinions (aimed at maintainability and performance) and a beginner can easily understand all the best practices. A must read if you are starting to learn about web development in 2014

There are many other good resources like HTML and CSS (codecademy), TeamTreehouse and many more that keep popping up every other day. But the links provided at the top have been standard for a long time.


A note on w3schools

For God's sake, don't check out W3Schools. The information is not accurate and the people behind that site don't bother to update / correct it when notified.

People use it just because it appears first in search results.

HyperTextMarkupLanguage, also known as html, is a language understood by the browser to make content understandable to humans. Hypertext are links and markup is labels.

CSS, also known as cascading style sheets, are used to design the content rendered by html. Basically you don't need CSS unless you want an attractive website.

Javascript is a client-side scripting language used to trigger some events based on user actions with the content rendered by the browser.

Speaking in simple language, html is the skeleton, css is the beauty, and javascript is the functionality activated by some actions.

To get started, you need to know at least the basics of HTML and CSS, such as how to create and access the id and class applied to specific elements of the web page and how the DOM (Document Object Model) is used to navigate to specific elements.

If you like animation more for the website, I suggest you go for JQuery, but start with HTML and CSS first because JavaScript is not meant to be a standalone programming language like Python or C ++, although you can use JavaScript for normal programs. . as well as.

The simple answer is: yes, you can learn JavaScript before learning HTML and CSS. But you will face thousands of HTML and CSS related problems.

Because JavaScript works with HTML and CSS. Every website on this planet is made with HTML and CSS. This is the most basic part of a website.

Quite simply, all the markup is HTML and all the styling of a website is CSS. JavaScript is a scripting language that works dynamically with HTML Markup and CSS Styling.

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