Should I get a degree if I want to found a startup or is it a waste of time?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Jonathan Thompson



Should I get a degree if I want to found a startup or is it a waste of time?

Get a degree. Only you can waste your own time. Caveat emptor.

It opens doors and makes life easier. That will never stop you from reaching your goals if you have the right mindset, skills, experience, and timing for a startup. Have you thought about the relevance of timing this decision? Is it binary?

Reconsider if your financial situation requires it.

If you live in a country where you have to take on overwhelming debt to maintain 3-4 more years of education, take some time to reconsider that decision based on exactly how your priorities will change over time. Not so easy. A start

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Get a degree. Only you can waste your own time. Caveat emptor.

It opens doors and makes life easier. That will never stop you from reaching your goals if you have the right mindset, skills, experience, and timing for a startup. Have you thought about the relevance of timing this decision? Is it binary?

Reconsider if your financial situation requires it.

If you live in a country where you must take on overwhelming debt to maintain 3-4 more years of education, take some time to reconsider that decision based on exactly how your priorities will change over time. Not so easy. However, a startup can, will, and perhaps should eat everything you have.

Be passionate about your topic and show courage.

Will you be on a topic that you are passionate about with inspiring people? Can you get a part time job? Can you support yourself? Can you grow as a person? Will you ever know what superior learning feels like if you don't at least try?

Get your experience first, then get started. Or don't.

You need 10 years of professional experience to demonstrate a track record and know enough about an industry and its target market to jump to the head of the queue when it comes to investing. Will you get that professional experience more conveniently with a degree? Probably. And remember, a title is an investment in you and your own development.

Consider alternative arrangements. The compromise is pragmatic.

There's no reason you can't start your career, get it right, take a year to develop yourself and your startup, and get back to it. Likewise, there's no reason why you can't dip your ankles in the water with an entrepreneurship course or ride someone else's skirt for a while until you're sure enough that the time is right. Be willing to compromise and do your best to understand your target market, the problems it solves, and refine a business model.

Don't contaminate yourself with the business life experiences of others.

If you are naturally drawn to the world of startups because you have tolerance for risk and intolerance for stagnation, join one and try it out for yourself. If after a year everything is going well and you have learned what you wanted, go back to school. If everything falls to shit, as in 9/10 cases, go back to school. College will teach you things about yourself, have the ability to ignite a passion in something that has nothing to do with it, show you how to learn independently (hopefully), and give you a safe environment to build on personal characteristics of determination. , ethics and approach that make other people think that you take less risk with their money when it comes time to start up. And there will be countless opportunities to "jump-start" whatever you want.

A title is an investment in yourself. Forge your own path.

In most places, a title is expensive and related to financial circumstances, but like all great investments, its success is determined by your own hand. And a great time. If you are too young to have experience in the area directly relevant to your idea or startup, college is probably the right choice for you. If there are financial pressures on you, seek scholarships and part-time employment. If you are a truly terrible 'school student', but a talented and disciplined 'experimental learner', then maybe your best course is the one you charted on your own - do your starter thing. Make your mistakes. Personally, I would prefer to invest in someone who knows what not to do because they have experience and competence above the value of a title.

Startups are a risky business - be honest with your time.

An idea is not a business until it is executed. Be relentlessly honest with yourself and say if you know exactly how difficult it is to get a business off the ground. And then try it out for yourself after getting your degree. I'll tell you a little hiring secret: Nobody cares what your first degree is, as long as you can get the job done right. It's all the life skills and personal development that happen to an individual in college that makes it a worthwhile investment - you can probably wait 3 years for your great job with a proper support network.

What gives meaning to this answer?

I was at this awkward crossroads not long ago, and that decision changed my life in ways that have yet to unfold. Was it the right decision for me at the time? I no longer care because speculating on whether or not he was a terrible lawyer is a moot point with no practical application. I reserve the right to change my mind at any time and go back to school if that makes me happy. I allow the possibility that I can do any other degree later.

Summary.

Get a stable place, get professional experience, learn what it means to run a startup (See: Problem. Solution. Business model) and earn your degree. There will be many opportunities to start moving down the line.

I founded a startup without a title. I will share my own story with you.

Before getting into the details, it is important that you understand that obtaining a degree and founding a startup are mostly independent. It's a great thing to have wondered if you really need a degree, we all should. If the answer is no, then you have to answer why, and if yes, you know exactly why.

I didn't graduate because I wanted to start a company. The truth is that, for most areas of study, attending university in my country is analogous to fighting with a crocodile that has you in the middle of the throat (it is

Keep reading

I founded a startup without a title. I will share my own story with you.

Before getting into the details, it is important that you understand that obtaining a degree and founding a startup are mostly independent. It's a great thing to have wondered if you really need a degree, we all should. If the answer is no, then you have to answer why, and if yes, you know exactly why.

I didn't graduate because I wanted to start a company. The truth is that, for most areas of study, attending university in my country is analogous to fighting with a crocodile that has you in the middle of the throat (it has been said that the most rational thing is to allow the crocodile pull you while you put your finger on it). eyes, but who the hell would be so serene in such a situation to remember and implement such knowledge?) Everyone knows that it is "a waste of time", but people do it anyway, and then convince themselves worth it. For me, I had decided a long time ago that this would not be my life. When the time came, I just had to prove, first to myself and then to others, that I had something better to do with my time.

Following a career without a degree is not easy. In fact, it's so difficult that you might want to wonder if it's worth saving time. This is because of "what people would think". It is very nice to imagine a life without caring what people think, but that is as far from any reality as possible. Especially those people are friends and family. You have to have a bigger reason than "it's a waste of time", or else, you would eventually regret your decision. There are many ways that we waste time. Earning a degree is actually one of the best ways to waste your time.

The simple answer to get a degree or not would be: it all depends on what you want out of life. If it's about wanting to start a business, you can do it while you're in school. The university environment is like a safe laboratory where you can easily test your ideas. You would hardly find anywhere else with a high concentration of like-minded people. It's a great place to grow your network, and even if you're not signed up, it's wise to visit as often as possible.

WORKING FOR A COMPANY VERSUS STARTING ONE:

  • HOW ARE YOU CONNECTED?
    • Personally, I have worked for people and confirmed that my life would be a nightmare if I built a career from this. I'm just inefficient that way. I have to be everywhere to feel like I am somewhere. For me, using my diploma "in case the start-up fails" is not an option. I'll just start another. There are maybe 100 startup options I can think of before considering applying for a full-time job.
  • WHAT TIME IS IT?
    • The unemployment rate at the moment is so high where I am that I am more likely to be successful creating a job than getting one, if I am really capable. When things improve, employers are more likely to seek out new graduates, because longtime graduates would be exhausted, have out-of-date knowledge, and lack relevant experience anyway. This also means that labor is very cheap at the moment.

So for what I want out of life, I have to forge my own path and start ASAP. Or I'm leaving here (and most likely never quite coming back).

A man who had been my physics teacher asked:

"What do you think it would be like when people found out that the person behind this great initiative doesn't have a title?"

I looked at him and smiled "but that's the point ...", I said. "... that would be a question of the relevance of the title, not the possibility of being successful without it."

Not that it's common, but I once met an investor who was particularly impressed that I took the 'bold step' of avoiding college (he asked out of curiosity). Ironically, we were on a college campus. He looked around and said:

"This is all nonsense."


The bottom line is knowing your stuff. If you need to go to college to know your stuff, do it.

Only if going to college will directly hamper your growth should you consider skipping it.

At the end of the day, life is a big gamble. The point of making well-thought-out decisions is not that they certainly turn out to be the best - it is that regardless of the outcome, you will be satisfied that you have done the best you could with the options you had.

I can only think of what I will say to my daughter if she asked me that question during high school.

“Avery, you are very smart. I know you are interested in starting a business and I want to encourage you to follow that path.

“I also want you to know that your business is likely to fail. I don't say that because I don't believe in you. I'm saying that most businesses fail.

“So I recommend going to college and getting your degree. A degree, especially when you are just beginning your career, opens many doors that cannot be opened without a degree.

"And, if you are still interested in starting your

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I can only think of what I will say to my daughter if she asked me that question during high school.

“Avery, you are very smart. I know you are interested in starting a business and I want to encourage you to follow that path.

“I also want you to know that your business is likely to fail. I don't say that because I don't believe in you. I'm saying that most businesses fail.

“So I recommend going to college and getting your degree. A degree, especially when you are just beginning your career, opens many doors that cannot be opened without a degree.

“And, if you are still interested in starting your business, start your business while in college. Many successful entrepreneurs have done just that.

“Sometimes their companies get so much traction that they decide to take a year out of school to continue working at their companies. Sometimes the company continues to grow and sometimes the company fails.

"At least if the company fails, you can finish school and get your degree."

I'd like to think I'd say that to my daughter. The reality is that only you can make the decision about what to do.

Just remember that your business will most likely fail. A college degree will have value regardless.

I really don't think it's a waste of time. Of course, it also depends on the type of program you want to enroll in, but in most cases it will be helpful for your future. By useful, I don't even mean the knowledge you will receive from your studies. Unless you are studying engineering, medicine, or another degree directly awarded to you by a profession, you are unlikely to use much of the knowledge you learn in college.

Rather, what gives you a degree is the various habits and experiences you gain: learning to meet deadlines; working in a team; working hard, often at night; presenting in front of

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I really don't think it's a waste of time. Of course, it also depends on the type of program you want to enroll in, but in most cases it will be helpful for your future. By useful, I don't even mean the knowledge you will receive from your studies. Unless you are studying engineering, medicine, or another degree directly awarded to you by a profession, you are unlikely to use much of the knowledge you learn in college.

Rather, what gives you a degree is the various habits and experiences you gain: learning to meet deadlines; working in a team; working hard, often at night; stand in front of a crowd. Those are passive skills that you are likely to learn in a business degree.

If you are asking if having a degree is a necessary requirement to found a startup, then no. There are countless examples of successful entrepreneurs without a college degree. But it's certainly not a waste of time and it won't hurt.

I don't have a title.

Tried to get one but gave it up twice. After the second time, I thought "you have to acknowledge your weaknesses", and mine was that I just can't bring myself to study in a structured academic environment. Oh ok.

That is not to say that I believe there is no value in having a title. Far from there. It can be immensely valuable, depending on what you study and where, as well as what you plan to do in your company (role and market).

But you shouldn't force it.

Most investors worry about a security as a substitute for other things (intelligence, salesmanship, business savv

Keep reading

I don't have a title.

Tried to get one but gave it up twice. After the second time, I thought "you have to acknowledge your weaknesses", and mine was that I just can't bring myself to study in a structured academic environment. Oh ok.

That is not to say that I believe there is no value in having a title. Far from there. It can be immensely valuable, depending on what you study and where, as well as what you plan to do in your company (role and market).

But you shouldn't force it.

Most investors worry about a security as a substitute for other things (intelligence, ability to sell, ability to do business, etc.), but only if those other things are no longer very visible.

You can read more here: Yuval Ariav (יובל אריאב) response to What do startup founders think of MBAs?

Don't confuse the success of college dropouts with the success of people who never went to college.

The most successful people on the planet either have a higher education degree or studied for one, then decided their current start is better and dropped out. A very rare group of people have been successful without having any ties to a college / university.

Going into college builds a network (it's hard to network for an 18-year-old without a college), cultivates your experience without parental supervision, gives you knowledge that cannot be achieved without it.

To go

Keep reading

Don't confuse the success of college dropouts with the success of people who never went to college.

The most successful people on the planet either have a higher education degree or studied for one, then decided their current start is better and dropped out. A very rare group of people have been successful without having any ties to a college / university.

Going into college builds a network (it's hard to network for an 18-year-old without a college), cultivates your experience without parental supervision, gives you knowledge that cannot be achieved without it.

Go for a degree, if you found the success that required you to drop out of school, then maybe you will.

You don't need a degree to found a startup. Having a degree does not hurt the chances of a startup.

What you need is to learn. If you have the natural temperament to learn, the discipline to implement learning in an experiment that results in superior learning, and you can learn systematically through bizdev, product, and market, then a college degree is less valuable than your own journey toward it. unknown.

If you learn best in a structured environment, where outcome and reward are controlled by others, and you need to learn both quantitative (STEM) and qualitative (humanities), and requires others to explain to you.

Keep reading

You don't need a degree to found a startup. Having a degree does not hurt the chances of a startup.

What you need is to learn. If you have the natural temperament to learn, the discipline to implement learning in an experiment that results in superior learning, and you can learn systematically through bizdev, product, and market, then a college degree is less valuable than your own journey toward it. unknown.

If you learn best in a structured environment, where outcome and reward are controlled by others, and you need to learn both quantitative (STEM) and qualitative (humanities), and require others to explain where the mistakes are and how to minimize them. So, a formal process is required. (The title is just a by-product, and in itself useless for startup, but the formal process to help you learn what you don't know you don't know is valuable.)

It's a waste of time, but do it anyway.

You will be judged by your Uni and the grade result that you obtained throughout your life.

Investors will use it as a proxy to judge you, clients, too. The staff will evaluate your pedigree.

Also, the reality is that you are more likely to fail, so a title is a good backup.

I highly recommend that you do it and therefore some entrepreneurial stuff in the uni.

Learning is not a waste of time. Following the rules to obtain a specific degree is irrelevant. If you follow the entrepreneurial career path, few people will care about their degrees. Sometimes it's painful to flash around a master's degree, it's more common to flash around your top-of-the-line income.

All that said, what I've found to be most important to entrepreneurial success is that the founders are generalists, with some skills in many different skills. Your Entrepreneurship Skills is a tool I made to measure those skills. If you have a gap (and most people do), then focus

Keep reading

Learning is not a waste of time. Following the rules to obtain a specific degree is irrelevant. If you follow the entrepreneurial career path, few people will care about their degrees. Sometimes it's painful to flash around a master's degree, it's more common to flash around your top-of-the-line income.

All that said, what I've found to be most important to entrepreneurial success is that the founders are generalists, with some skills in many different skills. Your Entrepreneurship Skills is a tool I made to measure those skills. If you have a gap (and most people do), focus on learning that skill.

Obtaining a degree will never be a waste of time in my opinion. There is a reason why it is known as "reading for a degree", because it is not about learning to do something, it is about learning to learn to do something, you (with guidance in most cases) he is doing for himself and that can help you with whatever you choose to pursue in life.

Self-investment and personal growth is possibly the best investment you can make in your future!

I dropped out of school in the middle of my freshman year out of the desire to get into the diamond business, I walked around like a fool for a year and then made my mother happy by getting a job.

Later, I got an MBA from a weekend program while working, and in the process I met a great number of quality people. Now, I run my own company and am involved in a completely different set of exciting businesses.

If you get the error, I tell you to go and do your thing. King, however, is experience and climbing the corporate ladder or other things of diversity gives you perspective and great connections.

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