My mom is going to call the police if I don't get out of her house by tomorrow. Can you get me kicked out? I'm 19.

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Luke Cox



My mom is going to call the police if I don't get out of her house by tomorrow. Can you get me kicked out? I'm 19.

The simple answer is yes, you are 19 years old and she no longer has any legal responsibility for you.

However, if you are in the US, she cannot kick you to the curb without a legally established number of days notice. Many places have a 30-day notice, so we will use it for this situation, understanding that you need to verify your specific location.

Mom gives you 30 days' notice to vacate the premises. I hope you have a job. If not, go immediately to your social services office for resources.

If you have a job, you should go to social services. They will have resources including job fairs, etc.

Keep reading

The simple answer is yes, you are 19 years old and she no longer has any legal responsibility for you.

However, if you are in the US, she cannot kick you to the curb without a legally established number of days notice. Many places have a 30-day notice, so we will use it for this situation, understanding that you need to verify your specific location.

Mom gives you 30 days' notice to vacate the premises. I hope you have a job. If not, go immediately to your social services office for resources.

If you have a job, you should go to social services. They will have resources including job fairs, etc. They can also share food bank locations and other food resources.

While you wait for your 30 days, start packing your things, get a PO box for your mail, and start forwarding your mail to your PO box. Will mom keep helping me with bills like phone, car insurance, health insurance? This is important to know as you need to make modifications now.

Be prepared to move in a day ahead of schedule, if possible. Also, in the future, it would be nice if you and your mom put everything in writing with signatures. At this point, you are a tenant.

You can do this if you work hard and keep your nose clean. The party is expensive. Smoking is expensive. Technology is expensive if you get the prettiest items. You need a cell phone, you need your electronic devices that you already own.

Meal. Ramen is cheap, but it is not healthy. A few ramens a week won't kill you, however always try to add a protein like a boiled egg. Eggs are cheap. Water is cheap. Soft drinks and specialty drinks are expensive. Try adding a vegetable or two each day. Carrots are cheap and easy. Bananas are cheap. A precooked rotisserie chicken can feed you for many days. Start watching YouTube for an easy, low-cost option for grocery shopping / cooking. If you qualify for food stamps, you cannot buy convenience foods. EDIT: You can't use food stamps to buy convenience foods. Obviously you can buy precooked food with another form of payment.

Without a doubt, this is incredibly scary. I have no idea of ​​the background of what led to the immediate situation outside the house. However, no matter the reason, she has the legal right to force you to leave, but not in one day. You certainly have mail that establishes your residence.

You are the master of your own life. You decide how much you want to work and how far you want to go.

Good luck.

I understand, and I could be wrong, that in the United States, yes, your mother can evict you because she is over 18, unless her name is on the lease or rental agreement.

I'm not going to get into a lecture on what you did wrong because maybe you live in a controlling and abusive home and this is more of the same. And if that's the case, I'm sorry for that guilty post. Wow. Or maybe you're the problem, or maybe it's a bit of both.

Instead, I answered your question and will offer you some ideas on what you can do right now to take care of yourself.

Keep reading

I understand, and I could be wrong, that in the United States, yes, your mother can evict you because she is over 18, unless her name is on the lease or rental agreement.

I'm not going to get into a lecture on what you did wrong because maybe you live in a controlling and abusive home and this is more of the same. And if that's the case, I'm sorry for that guilty post. Wow. Or maybe you're the problem, or maybe it's a bit of both.

Instead, I answered your question and will offer you some ideas on what you can do right now to take care of yourself, because whatever the reason, you will now be in the adult world and people will help you, but they will. Hope you get the job done.

My suggestion would be to pack essentials, don't forget phone chargers, etc., and if you have your own car, make sure you have the keys.

Make sure you have all the medications you need to take regularly. If you have access to things like your birth certificate, social security card, and driver's license, get them. You will need them.

If you have a friend or other family member to stay with, that's fine. You will still need to log in for help, but having a safe place to stay would be helpful.

Most cities have a number you can call in the county to access services. This is usually something like 2–1–1. Call them. Even if you are staying at a friend's house, tell them that you are homeless because you cannot stay there forever. Make sure to tell them your age. If you need and want addiction treatment, or are pregnant, or need medical care for a chronic condition (such as asthma or diabetes), tell them too. They will help you connect with people and places that can help you.

The reason your age is important is because there are sometimes services for teens up to 21 and that would be particularly helpful.

If you are applying for food stamps, make sure they know you are out of food at this time. They can usually give you emergency food stamps. If you get a disability check every month, go to Social Security and let them know they have thrown it and not to send your check there. Send it to a safe place or ask them what to do.

I'm sorry you're having a hard time. I hope I have helped.

First, the laws differ depending on where you live. If you live in the US, Call Free Legal Aid. Most county courts have a legal aid department that can help you, or at the very least, hire an attorney to give you free legal advice so that you can at least know your rights.

You are over the age of majority, that means you are legally an adult. Your parents are only legally responsible for you until you turn 18. After that, they are not legally obligated to support you or provide you with a place to live. Many parents choose to let their children stay home with conditions, you have to continue

Keep reading

First, the laws differ depending on where you live. If you live in the US, Call Free Legal Aid. Most county courts have a legal aid department that can help you, or at the very least, hire an attorney to give you free legal advice so that you can at least know your rights.

You are over the age of majority, that means you are legally an adult. Your parents are only legally responsible for you until you turn 18. After that, they are not legally obligated to support you or provide you with a place to live. Many parents choose to let their children stay at home with conditions, you have to follow their rules.

My son, who will be 24 in a month, still lives at home. He just graduated with his master's degree. Now he is looking for work. We let you live at home while you look for your job, but you still have to follow our rules. My number one rule is that you need to tell your mother where you are at all times. I'm not going to deal with her mother's panic about not knowing where she is or if she has had an accident. We are still paying for his cell phone, so he has to answer his mother an hour after she calls or texts him. If you don't, you have 30 days to find a place to live and will have to support yourself. This is a very simple and easy rule to follow, especially since you don't pay us rent.

He does this because he respects his mother, he loves his mother, and none of us want to deal with panic and concern for her safety. He is also grateful to have free room and board while looking for work. He wants to live alone and I don't blame him.

From the way you asked the question, it seems like you had an argument. I would go back and apologize immediately. Even if you live in a state that gives you tenant rights that would force your mother to go to court and get a court-ordered eviction notice, that will only give you 30 to 60 days notice. All you have to do is write him a letter, send it by certified mail with return receipt requested, and the clock starts ticking.

You have to follow their rules, no matter how unreasonable they seem to you. You may be able to resolve this by discussing things and reaching an agreement. Put the agreement in writing and both of you sign it. If this is not possible, agree on a schedule for when you will move out and put it in writing.

Then make a plan to move. Take advantage of job training opportunities that are available. Try your local community college. Try your local unemployment office. There are many places that will help you train for decent paying jobs available.

Of what you need to start saving money. No need to party with friends. Save as much money as you can while living at home. Take whatever job you can get while you go back to school or train for better jobs. Find roommates and a place to live. That way, if things get worse at home, you can move earlier if you need to. You should also consider going to college or vocational school and starting your career.

It is best to move out before your mother goes through the eviction process. Evictions rub off on your credit history and will make it difficult for you to rent a place to live.

As a high school teacher, I assume that the argument you had with your mother had something to do with your mother's concern for you. Maybe you don't take your future seriously or are just hanging out with friends. Maybe you expect your mom to provide you with everything that makes it easy for you to be lazy. Now you are an adult, it is time to support yourself, your mother has done her part. It is time for you to be an adult and behave like one and not depend on your mother's money, but instead earn your way in life.

Disclaimers: I don't know you or your data. I don't mean to be harsh on you or any other teenager. I still remember when I was a teenager and how everything seemed worse than the reality of whatever the situation was at the time. My son and I have struggled with mental illness at all times, please keep that in mind. If someone wants to comment that I am a bad father (has been before) for sharing our dirty laundry (with my son's permission) for the world to see, I don't care. (Insert a dirty laundry joke here, as it is my son's homework.)

Keep reading

Disclaimers: I don't know you or your data. I don't mean to be harsh on you or any other teenager. I still remember when I was a teenager and how everything seemed worse than the reality of whatever the situation was at the time. My son and I have struggled with mental illness at all times, please keep that in mind. If someone wants to comment that I am a bad father (has been before) for sharing our dirty laundry (with my son's permission) for the world to see, I don't care. (Insert a dirty laundry joke here, as it is my son's homework.) However, I really care if our family's story will help another young man in distress! So if you are that enemy, don't bother. My son will just laugh at it and I really need him to focus right now. :-)

That said, I have always chosen to overcome obstacles by being realistic. I am stubborn. I will over-share my "delayed release" situation for myself and my son's "delayed release" situation in the hope that the interlocutor will read to the end and choose to see and acknowledge a different perspective. Please think about it.

I'm telling my story here, not honking my own horn. My parents raised me well. I was willing to admit that out loud even back then, even though I didn't like it. They taught me right from wrong, how to use common sense and intelligence in decision-making, that there are consequences in every decision (good or bad), how to follow the rules, no matter how bad, I think I have it, it's worse for someone. other things, and how to support my own weight (i.e. doing housework, getting / keeping a job, etc.)

I got my first car just before I was 16 years old. My parents bought it, let's call it a loan. I used my first 6 months of paychecks to pay for parts to repair it and make it drivable (the brakes completely failed while I was driving it home from the seller's house, thank the Lord my dad was driving!). I paid my parents for the purchase price. during the same period of time. They paid for the first six months of car insurance out of support and respect for me when I started to grow into an adult. I paid for the car insurance thereafter and paid taxes, inspections and repairs to have the PRIVILEGE of driving it. While I was legally allowed to leave home at 17, and they could legally evict me at 17, I still technically still had nothing until I was 18.

I was 17 when I moved, voluntarily. I couldn't pitch the first time myself, hehehe, oops. Live and learn. I moved again. What a shame! When I was allowed to move in again, I decided not to follow the house rules and contribute significantly to the house (cleaning the house, doing laundry, buying my own sodas and snacks, etc.) So then I was kicked out while I was still 17. And YES, I verified at that point with a simple phone call to the police department that not only could they kick me out at 17, the police could be there to help them enforce the law and make sure my departure was peaceful. And that I did not take anything that did not belong to me such as furniture, bed, car, etc. They didn't call the police, I was able to continue using the car, it's time to go.

Boy, did I throw it that time. After I was kicked out, which was legal without prior notice at 17 where I lived, I slept for 3 weeks in an unheated 16-year-old car in the dead of winter. Texas can still get very cold in the winter. I was also looking for and getting a full-time job, in addition to the part-time job that I had had since shortly before I turned 16 (and held it until I was 19). I was taking care of my personal hygiene on a daily basis visiting a Circle K bathroom to be clean for work the next day.

Very easy! That's not sarcasm, it's my teenage self waking up to the real world and knowing I was wrong, admitting it to myself and then doing something responsible about it. Actually! When you choose to accept the reality of your situation, you can move to the next step of taking responsibility for your actions and doing something constructive with them. I found a roommate situation for the rest of the winter, thank goodness!

What can I say? My parents are baby boomers and they instilled in me that moral and work ethic. I decided to go ahead and put those skills to use. They didn't owe me anything. The world owed me nothing. The only thing he deserved at the time was a quick kick to the butt and he knew it!

Fast forward 27 years to today ...

I did everything I could to raise and support my son for the past 19 1/2 years, including making sure he had access to education, food, shelter, teaching him responsibility, and giving him the tools to become the adult I know. it may be one day. For the most part, I did this as a single mom. I give my parents credit for their compassion in choosing to help us the few times that I couldn't do it all on my own. It is not easy to eat crow at 25 with a newborn and an alcoholic husband. It is not easy to eat crow at 28 and 29 years old! They had no more responsibility to their grown daughter or young grandson. They did it anyway because they love us and they knew we could be successful. I had been successful, I fell through difficult times, I was successful again, then difficult times. I made mistakes

It is unfortunate that some people are reluctant to learn responsibility or use common sense, especially when they are known to be smart. It is heartbreaking to see an individual deny reality, to see him desperately trying to fall back on his perceived entitlement, wondering why his bad decisions don't work out the way he wants, blaming everyone and everything except oneself for one's mistakes.

So, I have a 19-year-old who is still bound by court order to live with me. He is currently in a half day GED school setting. While you are required to live with me, by court order you are required to follow house rules, contribute to the home, and abide by the curfew. You have a legitimate reason (IMO) not to work right now, as you must finish school and have a very early curfew. I know his limitations regarding his mental health and maturity level, and I know that seeking employment would be a step backward for him at this point in his life. I'd hazard a guess that 70% of teens don't have their limitations.

Her main tasks for the whole house are doing the dishes (washing, drying, putting away), doing the laundry (sorting, washing, drying, folding, putting away), cleaning her bathroom, and taking trash to the curb (once a week) . If he were alone, he would have to do all that and much more. As a mother, I am responsible for four times the amount and complexity of chores that I ask you to do. He refuses to go through with the first two, which are the most necessary. The third is too easy.

This is just the circumstance in our case. It is what it is. Due to the court order, I can't kick him out even if I want to.

Without providing details, I am 99% sure that he is not required by court order to live with his mother. Therefore, and unless there is a law where you reside that indicates otherwise, she has no obligation to continue to provide you with shelter and comforts. Your parental responsibility has been fulfilled since you were 18 years old.

On average, mothers and / or fathers have done their best to prepare you for the "real world" at this age. You are now an adult. It is time to start "adult". Use what you have presumably been taught. As a young man, it is time for you to leave your mother's nest and agree to launch yourself into the world and learn to fly on your own.

Make good decisions to win big consequences. Good luck and take care. If you stay alone now, you have a better chance of maintaining a good relationship with your mother, and that is usually for the best. Other answers to this question are excellent and worth reading in regards to finding education, employment, a peaceful arrangement with your mother if you wish to continue living with her, etc.

My son didn't want to work or go to college when he graduated from high school, he just wanted to play video games and hang out with his friends, when he got a job, they were jobs for high school kids. Pointless, part-time jobs. So I also kicked him out at 19. He didn't want to work a real 40-hour job or even pursue a trade to gain the skills necessary for a good career. You are only required to give 30 days notice prior to firing. But I gave it a year to fix it. I took out a credit card in his name to establish his credit. Then I got him a car and found him an apartment.

Keep reading

My son didn't want to work or go to college when he graduated from high school, he just wanted to play video games and hang out with his friends, when he got a job, they were jobs for high school kids. Pointless, part-time jobs. So I also kicked him out at 19. He didn't want to work a real 40-hour job or even pursue a trade to gain the skills necessary for a good career. You are only required to give 30 days notice prior to firing. But I gave it a year to fix it. I took out a credit card in his name to establish his credit. Then I got him a car and found him an apartment for him and his girlfriend. He moved out and didn't keep his job, and neither did his girlfriend, so they took him out of his nice apartment, his car was repossessed and his credit was ruined in less than a year. He used up the credit card I got him. He would buy expensive items and pay for them quickly, one at a time until his credit score ended at 825. I paid for him and gave him the card, told him not to use it unless it was an emergency. He got all kinds of useless stuff in there like video games, jewelry, clothes, shoes, eating out all the time, until he maxed out, then he applied for other credit cards, which I told him never to do, and he maxed them all out. those out. Now his credit is in the bathroom, he does not have a car and he lived house to house with friends. He just got another useless part time job and his girlfriend works there too, and they got an apartment with another couple, which is never a good idea, Unless you're in college and don't have a car yet. You can't come back here until I see him working full time and have another car. I won't help you until you help yourself.

In Trinidad, the Police will tell you to request a court hearing. Both will be heard on the dates indicated. According to the information, the Court will order you to leave before a certain date. If you can't, at the next hearing, ask for more time.

If she says that you are abusive and have threatened to kill her or any occupant of said house, or if she is a drug addict who steals the refrigerator motor and the stereo speakers while they are running, there will possibly be an anticipated date in court today or tomorrow, the court will order your departure immediately.

If you have drugs or illegal things in your

Keep reading

In Trinidad, the Police will tell you to request a court hearing. Both will be heard on the dates indicated. According to the information, the Court will order you to leave before a certain date. If you can't, at the next hearing, ask for more time.

If she says that you are abusive and have threatened to kill her or any occupant of said house, or if she is a drug addict who steals the refrigerator motor and the stereo speakers while they are running, there will possibly be an anticipated date in court today or tomorrow, the court will order your departure immediately.

If you have drugs or illegal things in the house, the Police will lock you up and complain to the Court about you with the evidence. You will be brought to court in handcuffs the same day or as soon as possible. So this is one way you can do it. How? Calling the police if you have something illegal in your room.

But who will bail you out? If they rescue you, where would you go? Released into bailer's custody?

Didn't you say what your reason or excuse is or if you are male or female? However, this may be misplaced, as the point is your question: can your mom kick you out tomorrow?

This introduces other questions including: "Can you complain to someone or organization that will result in your return immediately?" Then tomorrow he won't be able to kick you out. If you were still working, you would have asked your question at the station, so I hope some brilliant police officer or lawyer in your jurisdiction will answer this appropriately.

Sir / Madam, you will have to beg her for the next or last opportunity or time so that she can find a next place to live, unless she is the one selling the drugs or doing something illegal, in which case she must take yesterday's flight. Otherwise, you will have to promise to obey all of its rules and request permission to disobey one; You will have to promise to clean up all your clutter. Wash the merchandise, mow the lawn, feed the chickens, bathe the dogs, show more respect until …….

Let your mom call the police. Let your mom waste her time.

The police are unlikely and should not be involved in the situation. This is a civil matter that will be handled in court if necessary. However, if he becomes violent, he could be forced to leave. Take this time to prepare in case your mom eventually throws you out. Take this as a sign that your mom has serious problems with you living in the house. See if you can commit because these days, even with a college degree, it's hard to survive, let alone trying to make it on the streets.

In some states, if you have established residency (have received mail, have

Keep reading

Let your mom call the police. Let your mom waste her time.

The police are unlikely and should not be involved in the situation. This is a civil matter that will be handled in court if necessary. However, if he becomes violent, he could be forced to leave. Take this time to prepare in case your mom eventually throws you out. Take this as a sign that your mom has serious problems with you living in the house. See if you can commit because these days, even with a college degree, it's hard to survive, let alone trying to make it on the streets.

In some states, if you have established residency (received mail, have a key to the house) and have lived there for 30 days or more, you are a tenant at will, which means you have protections similar to a tenant. Contact food pantries and other resources in case you are evicted. You can also use a pantry if you need one for any reason, as long as you don't earn more than one amount per month. If you pay your rent, an eviction can affect your credit score. To ensure that an eviction does not occur after you receive the formal notice, be sure to leave according to its terms. Otherwise you may deal with other hurdles / costs. I am not a lawyer and at 19 it is ridiculous to pay a lawyer when you are most likely to lose. Use your money for smarter things. The reality is that if your mom wants you to leave, it is not that difficult. In certain states where you get these protections, your mom can't just suddenly kick you out because of a bad mood. The key is not to leave the residence until you receive the formal notice or a police officer tells you that you have to leave. If your mom just writes something into a Google template, it's most likely not qualified legal notice. Your mother has full permission to decide who to invite onto your mother's property. However, if your mom wants to evict someone, it requires a little more work and fees. Also VERY IMPORTANT do not sign or accept anything formal or informal agreeing when you will leave or what you are willing to do in exchange for being given the opportunity to stay. The key is not to leave the residence until you receive the formal notice or a police officer tells you that you have to leave. If your mom just writes something into a Google template, it's most likely not qualified legal notice. Your mother has full permission to decide who to invite onto your mother's property. However, if your mom wants to evict someone, it requires a little more work and fees. Also VERY IMPORTANT do not sign or accept anything formal or informal agreeing when you will leave or what you are willing to do in exchange for being given the opportunity to stay. The key is not to leave the residence until you receive the formal notice or a police officer tells you that you have to leave. If your mom just writes something into a Google template, it's most likely not qualified legal notice. Your mother has full permission to decide who to invite onto your mother's property. However, if your mom wants to evict someone, it requires a little more work and fees. Also VERY IMPORTANT do not sign or accept anything formal or informal agreeing when you will leave or what you are willing to do in exchange for being given the opportunity to stay.

Feel free to visit my blog www.livingwithintention.blog.video for more posts on moving if necessary in your situation.

She can. May I suggest you buy yourself some time trying to patch things up with her? Mothers often have an innate parenting disposition. Take advantage of that.

I have a friend with a heart of gold who is a single mother. Her son is 18 years old and lives at home. It is a nice house and she works hard so that her children can live emotionally and physically comfortably. Last year, the eldest son verbally abused her to the point where she collapsed while driving, cried often, and felt insecure and depressed about the names he called her. I got so tired of hearing the stories and seeing her distraught that

Keep reading

She can. May I suggest you buy yourself some time trying to patch things up with her? Mothers often have an innate parenting disposition. Take advantage of that.

I have a friend with a heart of gold who is a single mother. Her son is 18 years old and lives at home. It is a nice house and she works hard so that her children can live emotionally and physically comfortably. Last year, the eldest son verbally abused her to the point where she collapsed while driving, cried often, and felt insecure and depressed about the names he called her. I got so tired of hearing the stories and seeing her distraught that one day I asked her if I could talk to him. He's a tall guy and I'm only 5 ′ 6 ″ so I had to look up a lot. Despite the difference in height, he was in a reasonable frame of mind and seemed to be listening to what he was saying.

Unaware of their discussions, there was little that she could blame him for openly. Nor did she want to take him away from the conversation. I then affirmed that I loved him and revealed that what I was saying was hurting her. This he responded with "You have no idea what it's like to live with her!" I knew there was some truth to that (because yes, I didn't live with them). Still, I could not make him understand the privileges he enjoyed because he never had experiences of hardship. How could he explain that his mother was a dream mother? And that he was not speaking from a place of ignorance or trying to take sides?…. That I had lived with a mother who didn't know if I had dinner, or if I had books for school, and that for much of my teenage life I had lived without (her)? And without a father…. Because the very reason I was able to acknowledge his privilege was because of my fault. He didn't understand this: he was spoiled and couldn't see my point from the hazy haze of his high loft. She tossed her hair regularly and kept changing position. Soon I was out of the room.

They have had many unpleasant interactions since then and he still calls her crazy and wishes her death. She has threatened to kick him out, has packed his things and thrown them away a couple of times and yet he always comes back. He still lives at home. And even though they live under the same roof, she still loves him from afar.

There is hope for you.

I wonder why he feels the need to call the police to get you out. Personality differences? Why do not you go? There is no place to go, there is no reason to go. Life is comfortable where you are. My answer is based on assumptions like if she feels like you are not doing your best, you are sitting enjoying the food she pays for, and you feel you have the right to do nothing to support her. I hope to be wrong

I have 3 daughters who are now 29 and 26 years old (twins).

I never had to threaten them ... if you don't ... you have to go. Everyone knew that they wanted to be alone as an "adult". Without me telling you.

Keep reading

I wonder why he feels the need to call the police to get you out. Personality differences? Why do not you go? There is no place to go, there is no reason to go. Life is comfortable where you are. My answer is based on assumptions like if she feels like you are not doing your best, you are sitting enjoying the food she pays for, and you feel you have the right to do nothing to support her. I hope to be wrong

I have 3 daughters who are now 29 and 26 years old (twins).

I never had to threaten them ... if you don't ... you have to go. Everyone knew that they wanted to be alone as an "adult". Without me telling them, they took jobs between the ages of 18 and 20. I supported them while they were in school. For the country in which I live. in it was not difficult for them not only to have a part-time job while they were in school and to have another source of income because they were in school. They moved in between the ages of 19/22, being well equipped and able to care for themselves. I never asked them for money, but insisted that they learn the basic necessities of the home. It is amazing how many young people do not know how to boil an egg, clean the toilet bowl or wash clothes, buy food, and balance their finances. Basic things. They worked and saved money and with their job and student credentials they finally found their own places, down payment and all. You don't have to be a college student to get a place to live, but a solid job doesn't just mean you can afford the rent, it also means you're a responsible person.

All 3 have been successful in their endeavors. Doctorate, Master, Bachelor. Good works.

If you're sitting around playing video games and waiting for your next cooked meal and clean clothes, then yes, I really might want to kick you out, if not to shake yourself off and tell you to do it, help your home and society. Your mom / your parents are not going to live forever, so what are you going to do when they leave? Now is a good time to prepare for that moment. Also, after a certain time, parents also deserve to have their life. If you can talk to her to find out what you need to do for her in order to be at HER home. Once you realize that, do it. If he wants you to pay the rent ... Do it. The laws are different from state to state, but I suppose by law she can kick you out if you are no longer considered a child. Google your status and ask the question.

I observe that there is a pandemic at the moment, so finding a job could be difficult, if not impossible. But you can devote some time and energy to the domestic aspects of where you live. Ask your mom to give you a daily list ... maybe weekends off, of what you need help with. Put on your headphones and listen to your favorite music while you wash their windows or clean the fridge… whatever they ask of you, take responsibility with a smile and don't complain. If you are thinking that life is difficult now and you do not make changes in your life ... you have not seen anything yet.

Legally speaking, she probably can't just kick you out with just a few days notice. You should review your state's landlord-tenant law because, since you have established your residence, it must comply with the applicable landlord-tenant law to evict you.

Many states have similar laws, but I am only licensed in Nebraska and therefore the following is only reliable if it applies to Nebraska law.

Under the Nebraska Uniform Landlord and Tenant Act, the default lease in the absence of a written lease is month-to-month. This would likely apply to you under Nebraska law. The landlord must notify 30 days

Keep reading

Legally speaking, she probably can't just kick you out with just a few days notice. You should review your state's landlord-tenant law because, since you have established your residence, it must comply with the applicable landlord-tenant law to evict you.

Many states have similar laws, but I am only licensed in Nebraska and therefore the following is only reliable if it applies to Nebraska law.

Under the Nebraska Uniform Landlord and Tenant Act, the default lease in the absence of a written lease is month-to-month. This would likely apply to you under Nebraska law. The landlord must give 30 days' notice to terminate a month-to-month lease. There are several other scenarios that can shorten this period of time, such as physical threats and illegal activities performed by the tenant. However, in the absence of such actions or breaches of a lease, the landlord has to give 30 days notice to terminate the lease. To clarify, that's a 30-day notice to terminate the tenant's legal right to be on the property. After such notification,

I inform you cautiously about these laws because tenants can and often do abuse them, forcing landlords to waste time and money getting rid of unwanted tenants. And since most tenants are failsafe, the landlord is unlikely to recover damages from the tenant.

Despite the legal procedures available to you, choosing to enforce these against your mother, who has likely sacrificed a lot for your benefit, may not be the smartest option. Perhaps now is a good time to reflect on their reasons for kicking you out.

I say it in the best possible way:

You absolutely must stop lying to yourself and honestly do some serious soul-searching. You posed this as a legal question and avoided the actual job ... this may be indicative of the real reason your mom wants you out in the first place. It's presumptuous of you and speaks to your authoritarian mindset that you want to focus on a legal aspect. (By the way, the law is on your side on this, even if it may take some time.) He didn't include any details in his question, maybe to get some sympathy from the respondents, but I'm sure he knows why you didn't.

Keep reading

I say it in the best possible way:

You absolutely must stop lying to yourself and honestly do some serious soul-searching. You posed this as a legal question and avoided the actual job ... this may be indicative of the real reason your mom wants you out in the first place. It's presumptuous of you and speaks to your authoritarian mindset that you want to focus on a legal aspect. (By the way, the law is on your side on this, even if it may take some time.) He didn't include any details in his question, perhaps to gain some sympathy from the respondents, but I'm sure he knows why you didn't include your details.

What is your full time occupation? If you are a student, show good faith and get a part-time job. If you are not a full-time student, you should have a full-time job as an adult and possibly take some classes as a part-time student to improve your credentials in some way. If you are not working and you are not a student, your full-time occupation should be: Looking for work. You need to get up every day, dress appropriately, and hit the pavement, armed with multiple copies of a resume and a list of references.

I suspect you are not doing those things. Chances are, before your mom gave you 1 day to go out, she told you many times to do one of the above, and you simply lived in a youthful haze of denial and avoidance, rather than following her advice. As a mother, it must hurt you that you've come to this show of tough love, and yet you keep procrastinating, playing the victim, and looking to see what legal recourse is available. She must be heartbroken and disappointed in you and herself, and feels like she should tell you to leave because if she doesn't, you will never do anything to take one step toward becoming a responsible adult. She must love you very much to be willing to tell you to leave, rather than allow you to see yourself as a victim and see her as a facilitator. How strong he must be to do this for you. How lucky you are to have a father willing to take this path. How lucky you are to have his strength behind you, even if you have too much right right now to acknowledge it. How lucky you are to have her as a role model. Now, rise to the occasion and go out into the world and show it that it had every reason to believe in you and that you did the right thing.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.