My grandmother is a pomak. Am I Bulgarian or Turkish?

Updated on : January 20, 2022 by Adonis Ashley



My grandmother is a pomak. Am I Bulgarian or Turkish?

If you are a citizen of Turkey, you are Turkish.

If you are a citizen of Bulgaria, you are Bulgarian.

The Pomaks are Bulgarian-speaking Muslims who inhabit Bulgaria, northeastern Greece, and primarily northwestern Turkey. Their exact origin remains unknown and has been interpreted differently by Turkish, Bulgarian, and Greek historians, but they are generally considered to be descendants of native Eastern Orthodox Bulgarians and Paulicians who also previously converted to Orthodoxy and the Catholic faith, who were they converted to Islam during the Ottoman rule of the Balkans. Information through Ottomans and Catholics

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If you are a citizen of Turkey, you are Turkish.

If you are a citizen of Bulgaria, you are Bulgarian.

The Pomaks are Bulgarian-speaking Muslims who inhabit Bulgaria, northeastern Greece, and primarily northwestern Turkey. Their exact origin remains unknown and has been interpreted differently by Turkish, Bulgarian, and Greek historians, but they are generally considered to be descendants of native Eastern Orthodox Bulgarians and Paulicians who also previously converted to Orthodoxy and the Catholic faith, who were they converted to Islam during the Ottoman rule of the Balkans. Information through reports from Catholic and Ottoman missionaries supports this theory.

Source: Pomaks - Wikipedia

You are everything you feel inside. Your grandmother is a Bulgarian Muslim, at least that's what "Pomak" means. Over time, the communities assimilate into the general population of the region / country, so some members of the Pomak community may feel like Greeks, Turks, or even Macedonians. Some important factors are language and culture. You are a Bulgarian Muslim if you speak / understand Bulgarian and / or you like Bulgarian customs, traditions, cuisine, nature and, in general, you like or are interested in Bulgaria. More information on the subject here

their great ancestors actually originate from Manchuria (YeMaek tribes). They have different names at different ages. Yimek> Yaman> Kimek> Yamak> Pomak

What about grandpa? the pomaks are Muslim Bulgarians, and surprise

Bulgarians - Wikipedia Extinct Turkish Tribal Confederation The Bulgarians (also Bulghars, Bulgari, Bolgars, Bolghars, Bolgari, Proto-Bulgarians 2) were Turkish semi-nomadic warrior tribes that flourished in the Pontic-Caspian steppe and the Volga region during the 7th century . They were known as nomadic horsemen in the Volga-Ural region, but some researchers say their ethnic roots go back to Central Asia. 3 During their migration westward through the Eurasian steppe, the Bulgarian tribes absorbed other ethnic groups and cultural influences in a process of ethnogenesis, including the Indo-European, Finno-Ugric, and Hunic tribes. 4 5 6 7 8 9 Modern genetic research on the Turkic peoples of Central Asia and ethnic groups related to the Bulgarians points to an affiliation with the populations of western Eurasia. 9 10 11 The Bulgarians spoke a Turkish language, that is, the Bulgarian language of the Oghuric branch. 12 They preserved the military titles, organization and customs of the Eurasian steppes, 13 as well as pagan shamanism and the belief in the sky deity Tangra. 14 Bulgarians became semi-sedentary during the 7th century in the Pontic-Caspian steppe, establishing the policy of Old Greater Bulgaria c. 630–635, which was defeated by the Khazar Empire in 668 AD. C. C ª. 679, Khan Asparukh conquered Scythia Minor, opened the access to Moesia and established Danube Bulgaria, the First Bulgarian Empire, where the Bulgarians became a political and military elite. They later merged with established Byzantine populations, 15 16 as well as previously settled Slavic tribes, and were eventually Slavicized. thus forming the ancestors of modern Bulgarians. 17 The remaining Pontic Bulgarians migrated in the 7th century to the Volga River, where they founded the Volga Bulgaria; they preserved their identity well into the 13th century. 12 The Volga and Chuvash Tatars claim that they originated from the Volga Bulgarians. 12 18 Etymology and origin The etymology of the Bulgar ethnonym is not fully understood and is difficult to trace before the 4th century AD. C. 19 20 From the work of Wilhelm Tomaschek (1873), 21 it is generally said to be derived from the Proto-Turkish root * bulga- 22 ("to stir", " mix ";" to mix "), which with the consonant suffix -r implies a noun meaning" mixed ". 23 24 Other scholars have added that bulğa could also imply" stir "," instead of the adjective "mixed"). 21 Both Gyula Németh and Peter Benjamin Golden initially defended the "mixed race" theory, but later, like Paul Pelliot, 28 considered that "inciting", "rebelling" or "producing a state of disorder", that is, the "troublemakers", 29 30 31 26 was a more likely etymology for migratory nomads. 31 26 According to Osman Karatay, if the "mixed" etymology was based on the westward migration of the Oğurs, meeting and merging with the Huns, to the north https: //en.wikipedia. org / wiki / Bulgars instead of the adjective "mixed"). 21 Both Gyula Németh and Peter Benjamin Golden initially defended the "mixed race" theory, but later, like Paul Pelliot, 28 considered that "inciting", "rebelling" or "producing a state of disorder", that is, the "troublemakers", 29 30 31 26 was a more likely etymology for migratory nomads. 31 26 According to Osman Karatay, if the "mixed" etymology was based on the westward migration of the Oğurs, meeting and merging with the Huns, to the north https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgars , that is, the "troublemakers", 29 30 31 26 was a more likely etymology for migratory nomads. 31 26 According to Osman Karatay, if the "mixed" etymology was based on the westward migration of the Oğurs, meeting and merging with the Huns, to the north https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgars, that is, the "troublemakers", 29 30 31 26 was a more likely etymology for migratory nomads. 31 26 According to Osman Karatay, if the "mixed" etymology was based on the westward migration of the Oğurs, meeting and merging with the Huns, to the north https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulgars

welcome back to your home.

Yes, there is still some resentment, at least in the people of my generation. I am not going to discuss here the rights of Romanians to southern Dobrudja, an area of ​​predilection for Romanians for recreational purposes between the two world wars and where our royal house had built their summer residence in Balcic. The grudge comes from the fact that we were forced to give up that land under duress, in a situation where Nazi Germany forced us to redesign the borders to our greatest disadvantage. Seated Aromanian had to be evacuated in humiliating conditions

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Yes, there is still some resentment, at least in the people of my generation. I am not going to discuss here the rights of Romanians to southern Dobrudja, an area of ​​predilection for Romanians for recreational purposes between the two world wars and where our royal house had built their summer residence in Balcic. The grudge comes from the fact that we were forced to give up that land under duress, in a situation where Nazi Germany forced us to redesign the borders to our greatest disadvantage. The settled Aromanian had to be evacuated in humiliating conditions and relocated to another location within our country, which had been reduced to a tiny size.

A few years ago I had a private conversation with a Bulgarian colleague and showed him the picture above, a mural fresco from Cozia Abbey depicting Prince Mircea the Elder of Wallachia, who built it and where he was buried according to his will.

My colleague replied: "The inscription on the mural is in Bulgarian" and then continued "your whole country was Bulgarian once". I stopped the conversation at that point, aware of the fact that I was making a reference to the Old Bulgarian Empire from the 10th century AD, image below

Well, the configurations change in history, even if the Bulgarian emperors exercised sovereign rights over the territory that we define today as Romania that did not make us Bulgarians and the fact that Prince Mircea used Old Church Slavonic as the official language in his chancellery. it does not mean that it was their mother tongue.

Over the years, I have noticed that some people put a lot of mindless energy into a world of nationalistic delusions, while real life is characterized by other parameters.

The fact that both Romania and Bulgaria are now EU member states has certainly eased many grudges in the past and, in the long run, this could contribute to a more pragmatic approach to the reality of the day when people are free. circulate and settle on both sides of previously contested borders.

The people of Gagauz spoke and spoke a dialect of the Turkish language.

The Gagauz are Christians and therefore cannot be Turks.

Gagauzo who lives in Bulgaria | Greece | Romania are Bulgarians | Greeks | Romanians now. For all of them, the Bulgarian | Greek | The Romanian language (correspondingly) is his mother tongue now. Some of them no longer speak Turkish and are therefore no longer true Gagauz.

Now, there are only true gagauz on the territory of the former USSR. If they are not Russified yet ...

Now let's go to history in general and to the history of languages.

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The people of Gagauz spoke and spoke a dialect of the Turkish language.

The Gagauz are Christians and therefore cannot be Turks.

Gagauzo who lives in Bulgaria | Greece | Romania are Bulgarians | Greeks | Romanians now. For all of them, the Bulgarian | Greek | The Romanian language (correspondingly) is his mother tongue now. Some of them no longer speak Turkish and are therefore no longer true Gagauz.

Now, there are only true gagauz on the territory of the former USSR. If they are not Russified yet ...

Let us now turn to history in general and to the history of languages ​​in particular. I am confused how people can ignore this topic.

In the territory that is now called Dobruca, the Gagauz people appeared. (Dobruja - Wikipedia). In eastern Bulgaria, including Dobruca, the Turkish language has been dominant for several centuries - it was the imperial language of the Ottoman Empire. The entire male population of eastern Bulgaria, including Dobruca, was fluent in Turkish. In particular, all the Bulgarian men in eastern Bulgaria were fluent in Turkish. In particular, in Dobruca, the entire Christian population, men and women, spoke fluent Turkish and abandoned the Bulgarian language. That is how the Gagauz people arose.

Language is an object, an identifiable object. The language spoken by the Gagauz people came from Anatolia to the Balkans. That way he had to cross the Strait. The language then crossed the Straits residing in the mouth and ears of Muslims generally called Turks. Searching for some old Oghuz Turkic languages ​​is more than inappropriate.

The events of the last two or three centuries are well known:

  • Around 1800, the population exchanges between the Russian Empire and the Ottoman Empire took place several times. The Christian population of eastern Bulgaria, including Dobruca, regardless of their spoken language, Bulgarian or Turkish, was attracted to emigrate to the southern territories of the Russian Empire. The only true Gagauz people living today are among the descendants of these migrants. This is the current Gagauzia (Gagauzia - Wikipedia).
  • South Dobruca is now in Bulgaria. Education and the media made the entire population of Bulgaria speak Bulgarian fluently. Therefore, the people of Gagauz are no longer distinguished from the other Bulgarians. Mixed marriages completed this assimilation process.
  • North Dobruca is now in Romania. Similar processes most likely occurred there.
  • Around 1900, as part of a religious dispute between Orthodox Christians between so-called patriarchists and ex-archists, many patriarchists, regardless of their newly spoken language (Bulgarian-Greek-Turkish), emigrated from Bulgaria to Greece. In this way, some Gagauz emigrated to Greece.

Article by Dimitar Taralezhkov for the "International Survey: Bulgaria-Italy" from Novinite.com - Sofia News Agency (Sofia News Agency.

Bulgarograsso, Bulgaro and Bulgarello, near Como; Bolgare, near Bergamo, Bulgaria (Cesena - Forl?); Bolgheri - near Livorno; Celle di Bulgheria (Salerno) or Monte Bulgheria (in the Cilento Natural Park (Salerno) and many others. How did these names come to be?

One of the main hypotheses, undoubtedly, points to the Bulgarians, also known as proto-Bulgarians, and their arrival in Europe and the lands of present-day Italy, where they settled leaving their legacy in t

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Article by Dimitar Taralezhkov for the "International Survey: Bulgaria-Italy" from Novinite.com - Sofia News Agency (Sofia News Agency.

Bulgarograsso, Bulgaro and Bulgarello, near Como; Bolgare, near Bergamo, Bulgaria (Cesena - Forl?); Bolgheri - near Livorno; Celle di Bulgheria (Salerno) or Monte Bulgheria (in the Cilento Natural Park (Salerno) and many others. How did these names come to be?

One of the great hypotheses, without a doubt, points to the Bulgarians, also known as proto-Bulgarians, and their arrival in Europe and the lands of present-day Italy, where they settled, leaving their legacy in the name of settlements, mountains, regions, etc.

Researchers believe that in AD 377 C. - 453 d. C. part of the proto-Bulgarian tribes settled in Central Europe and began to play a key role in the tribal union of the Huns. It is interesting to note that in the precious ancient manuscript titled "Nominalia of the Bulgarian Khans", its first ruler is called Avitohol, who according to various authors is most likely exactly the Hun chief Attila.

As part of the tribal union of the Huns, these Bulgarians participated in numerous military incursions into Byzantium, as well as the territories of present-day Germany, France, and Italy. The proto-Bulgarian armed forces were famous for their military skill and high fighting spirit, their main weapon being the maneuverable and swift cavalry, which enabled them to carry out hit-and-run and hit-and-run attacks.

The tribal union of the Huns began their attacks against Italy around 401 AD led by Alaric I, and became especially intense during the rule of Attila. However, Attila died in 453 AD and his vast empire began to quickly dissolve. It is precisely during the time of the Hun period that the first settlement of proto-Bulgarians in northern Italy is dated. Back then, the Bulgarians went to Friuli, but were pushed back and most returned to the lands along the lower Danube.

Following the breakdown of the tribal union of the Huns, some of the proto-Bulgarians remained in Pannonia, today Western Huntary, from where, according to some authors, they began to undertake joint raids from Italy along with the Langobards and the Gepids in between. 6th century. In one of these invasions they entered Italy and settled in the valleys of the Isonzo and Tagliamento rivers. Again, in the middle of the 6th century, the Protobulgarians of Pannonia were included in the Avar Khaganate.

In the 6th century, Bulgarians also came to Italy within the ranks of the Byzantine troops who landed in Sicily, but there is more interesting, if somewhat controversial, information about the arrival of groups of proto-Bulgarians to Italy in the middle. from the 7th century, related to the names Alcek and Altsiok. According to some sources, the person in question is the fifth son of the ruler of the so-called Ancient Greater Bulgaria Khan Kubrat - Alcek; according to others, this is the leader of the Bulgarians within the Avar Khaganate called Altsiok.

The Frankish historian Fredegarius, for example, recounts a war of intestines for power between a Bulgarian and an avar bidder for the throne, which broke out in AD 631. C. and ended with a defeat of the Bulgarians.

Some of them left Pannonia and, led by Altsiok, set out for the lands of the Frankish king Dagobert I in present-day Bavaria. At first, the Franks welcomed them by granting them refuge in their settlements. However, one night the king ordered his inferiors to kill the new settlers, and in the carnage that followed, only 700 of the 9,000 proto-Bulgarians survived. Later they got permission from King Langobardo Grimoald to settle in the Exarchate of Ravenna.

According to the Byzantine chronicler Theophanes the Confessor, shortly before his death, the ruler of Ancient Greater Bulgaria, Khan Kubrat, left his five children the legacy of not separating and protecting the unity of their union. However, they did not comply with their will and Old Greater Bulgaria collapsed under the attacks of the Khazars. Some of the Proto-Bulgarians led by Kubrat's youngest son Alcek are believed to have settled on the lands of the Langobard kingdom.

Some of the contradictory information on how this settlement occurred is provided by the Langobardian historian and monk, who lived in the 8th century, Paul Warnerfred, also known as Paul the Deacon (Paulus Diaconus in Latin) in the fifth book of his „Historia Langobardorum. "That, without knowing why, around 667 AD, the Khan of the Bulgarians Alcek left his homeland, entered Italy in peace and with all his men presented himself at the disposal of King Grimoald (662 - 671 c.), Lending him their service, and asking to remain in their territory.

The latter sent him to the Duchy of Benevento in the Molise and Campania regions northeast of Naples to his son Romuald, whom he ordered to provide Alcek with a space where the latter could live with his people. Romuald warmly welcomed Alcek and offered him vast lands, which had been left unpopulated, such as Gallo Matese, Sepino, Bojano, Isernia and "other peoples with their lands."

The proto-Bulgarians of Khan Alcek had the opportunity to work these lands, which had been left without population as a result of the great leprosy epidemics in this part of Italy. According to the Italian researcher, Dr. Vincenzo D'Amico, Alcek installed his capital in the small town of Cantalupo di Bojano (Cantalupo nel Sannio). D'Amico even claims that the name Cantaloupe comes from the proto-Bulgarian words "kan-teleped", meaning residence of the Khan.

Little by little, as Dr. D'Amico alleges, the Bulgarian colonization spreads from Benevento throughout southern Italy. At a later stage, the Bulgarians also settled further south in the Mingardo river area, around the rocky ridge, which is still called Monte Bulgheria, and one of the cities at its feet is called Celle di Bulgheria, in the region . from Campania.

According to many historians, Alcek and Atsiok are one and the same historical personality, the youngest son of Khan Kubrat. However, although this accusation is based on the investigators' conclusions, there does not appear to be direct evidence for it. In any case, the Bulgarians settled in Italy during different periods of the Middle Ages, staying there forever, making Italy their homeland. At first they lived in dense places, but later they spread throughout Italy.

Despite some inaccuracies caused by outdated ideas about the origin of Bulgarians at that time, in his studies of Bulgarians in the Middle Ages 1, Dr. Vincenzo D'Amico states that there are hundreds of settlement names in Italy which has a proto-Bulgarian origin.

In 1960, in his pamphlet on Bulgarians who settled in Italy 2, Dr. Ivan Bankovski, citing Dr. D'Amico's research, writes that among the ancient Bulgarian place names of geographical places in Italy, those with A root of “bolg” or “bulg” should be noted first. Here are some of the ones he mentions: Bolgare (near Bergamo), Bolgiano (near Milan), Bulgarograsso, Bulciago, Bulgaro, Bulciaghetto and Bulgarello (near Como), Bolgher (Trento), Bulgaria (Cesena - Forli), the The Monte Bulgheria mountain and the municipality of Celle di Bulgheria, in southern Italy, etc.

Roots like "bolg" and "bulg" exist to this day in many Italian surnames such as: Bulgari, Bulgarelli, Bulgarini, Bulgherini, Bulgaroni, Bulgaro, Bolgheri, Bolgarini, Bolgaroni, Bugarini. According to the researchers, those who carry them are distant descendants of proto-Bulgarians. In addition to the “bulg” and “bolg” roots, according to the same authors, there are two more roots of proto-Bulgarian origin in Italy.

One of them is "cara", which means something black like "carbone" (coal), and the second is "can", like the already mentioned name of Cantalupo di Bojano. The root "cara" is contained in the name of the following placet: Carasco (Genoa province), Caramagna, Carasone and Caraglio (Cuneo province), Caragna (Calizzano, Savona province), Caranza (Liguria), Carate (Milan) , Caranero (Como), Carata (Novara), Caravate (Varese), Caravonica (Imperia), among others.

Anonymous Dude, what the hell are you talking about? What radical leftist racist psychopath told you that "white" is an invention of the "white supremacist"? The whites, the reds, the blacks, the yellows, those are not social constructions either, those are classifications because you cannot live in a world where races and races will not get their names and labels. What you propose is IMPOSSIBLE!

As for Bulgarians, believe me, they are considered "white" in the US because all Caucasians in the US are labeled with the "white" ethnicity even by the US government itself. "white" however are the

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Anonymous Dude, what the hell are you talking about? What radical leftist racist psychopath told you that "white" is an invention of the "white supremacist"? The whites, the reds, the blacks, the yellows, those are not social constructions either, those are classifications because you cannot live in a world where races and races will not get their names and labels. What you propose is IMPOSSIBLE!

As for Bulgarians, believe me, they are considered "white" in the US because all Caucasians in the US are labeled with the "white" ethnicity even by the US government itself. However, the "whites" are the people of the West, which means Western Europe and the places where they established their colonies like Scandinavia, North America, Australia, and New Zealand from northern Europe. That's the "white race" or the "white ethnicity" if you want a more modern term.

And I just want to edit my answer a bit. Since you are tearing up the whites and the topic here is about the Bulgarians, do you have any idea what the non-white Turkish Empire did to the indigenous Bulgarians? Have you heard of the Batak genocide or the millions of Bulgarian men who were castrated and sold in chains in the Middle East and North Africa? What about the Bulgarian women who were sold as sex slaves by non-white Muslim Turks? Or better yet, what about the millions of Orthodox Christians who were beheaded by the Turkish invaders? Of the Greek and Armenian genocides perpetrated by the Turkish Empire itself, there are still survivors to this day, as they did not happen as long ago as slavery in America.

I apologize for my poor English skills, I am also from Eastern Europe.

Well, that depends. The part of Greece that usually had contacts and interacted with the southern Balkan countries is the northern third of the country. The rest of the country, the south and the islands rarely had contact with the people of the southern Balkans, as their late medieval history and the last 2 centuries found them with more contacts with southern Europe and the west than with the Balkans, either through foreigners. occupation (medieval Franks, Venetians, etc.) or through the German and Danish aristocracies since the beginning of the 19th century, with all these things reflected in the culture, the mentality, but the most imp

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Well, that depends. The part of Greece that usually had contacts and interacted with the southern Balkan countries is the northern third of the country. The rest of the country, the south and the islands rarely had contact with the people of the southern Balkans, as their late medieval history and the last 2 centuries found them with more contacts with southern Europe and the west than with the Balkans, either through foreigners. (medieval Franks, Venetians, etc.) or through the German and Danish aristocracies since the beginning of the 19th century, with all these things reflected in the culture, the mentality, but most importantly, the race that is asked here, since even genetically these parts of Greece are quite different. from Bulgaria and other Balkan peoples.

Now, as for the north of Greece, where I am partially from, and which is geographically and historically closer to Bulgaria and the Balkans in general, the mixing started already in the 6th to 7th century, when the first waves of Slavs invaded Bulgaria and they assimilated the native Greeks. speakers * and at the same time was assimilated by the native Greeks in Greece and especially in the northern regions, and ended in 1913, when with the end of the Balkan wars, northern Greece was liberated by the Greek kingdom and the Most of the Bulgarians in the region and the Greeks in Bulgaria exchanged with each other, and those who stayed for the most part were assimilated.

The best evidence for this is that Bulgaria is genetically closer to Greece than it is to the northernmost Slavic countries such as Russia or Poland. On the other hand, Greece has more Slavic mix than other Mediterranean / Southern European countries, and the further north you go in the country, the closer genetically to the Balkan genetic results you will get, and vice versa, the further south you go, more "Southwest" Mix you get

* However, Greek speakers in early medieval Bulgaria, excluding those near the coasts, did not have Greek roots, but rather had Hellenized Thracian origins.

None of these nations constitute a race, they are all hybrids like most nations.

There are similarities, many of them in fact, but there are also differences.

They are all a mixture of ancient Greeks, Armenians, Persians, Albanians, the people of southern Russia and the Caucasus, Georgians, Albanians, Thracians, Slavs, Turkish nomads, Arabs, Kurds.

But the component of each is very different. There would be a lot of Slavic and Greek in Bulgarian, but little or no Arabic and Armenian. They also have some Central Asian (more than Greeks, sure) through the original Bulgarian tribe that gave

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None of these nations constitute a race, they are all hybrids like most nations.

There are similarities, many of them in fact, but there are also differences.

They are all a mixture of ancient Greeks, Armenians, Persians, Albanians, the people of southern Russia and the Caucasus, Georgians, Albanians, Thracians, Slavs, Turkish nomads, Arabs, Kurds.

But the component of each is very different. There would be a lot of Slavic and Greek in Bulgarian, but little or no Arabic and Armenian. They also have something of Central Asia (more than Greeks, for sure) through the original Bulgarian tribe that gave their country its name.

The Greeks would have a lot more Ancient Greek, Italian and Albanian than the others and probably a bit more African too (Cyprus and Crete are so close to Africa).

The Turks (at least those from eastern Turkey) would hate to hear this, but they probably have more Armenians and Kurds than everyone else, and more from Central Asia.

Nationalists on each side would argue differently, of course, showing how stupid they all are.

A Turk would be from Central Asia without the blood of the infidel Greeks, Slavs, Armenians.

A Bulgarian would be a pure Slavic, a bit like someone from Western Russia, Belarus.

A Greek would be nothing more than a pure descendant of the ancient Greeks.

Not all people, but some radical movements like ATAKA (ATTACK) (What an offensive title for a political party) have hostile feelings towards the Turks.

The writing and teaching of history in the Balkan countries is based on Turkish-Ottoman hatred at all levels of the educational process.

But think that it is also possible to meet countless friendly people in this country.

A couple of them are my friend:

Hi NELI,

Greetings to all Bulgarian friends… :)

Bulgarian ultranationalist party Ataka

Shipka Hill and a monument symbolize Bulgarian independence after the Turkish-Russian war of 1877-1878 in the background

Shi

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Not all people, but some radical movements like ATAKA (ATTACK) (What an offensive title for a political party) have hostile feelings towards the Turks.

The writing and teaching of history in the Balkan countries is based on Turkish-Ottoman hatred at all levels of the educational process.

But think that it is also possible to meet countless friendly people in this country.

A couple of them are my friend:

Hi NELI,

Greetings to all Bulgarian friends… :)

Bulgarian ultranationalist party Ataka

Shipka Hill and a monument symbolize Bulgarian independence after the Turkish-Russian war of 1877-1878 in the background

Shipka Hill, 1877–1878 Turkish-Russian War, gateway to Bulgarian independence.

The Turkish signatures (Hatt-ı Hümayun-1856) and the constitution are under the feet of the Bulgarian woman.

A banner: "Freedom or death" March 3 (Uprising against the Ottoman-Turkish ruling)

Probably nothing. Natona states are something quite new and those tests can only tell you that you are like most people in some country. No who are you.

But in case you want to speculate, it is possible that it is actually Greek in origin. Not only because the Turkey of today is in the lands of Byzantium. A few centuries ago, the natons meant nothing, but religion was the big problem. I am Bulgarian. During the Ottoman rule… hm… the laws were different for Muslims and non-Muslims. And at one point there were (debatable how and if it was enforced) Islamization campaigns in the regions of present-day Bulgaria and G

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Probably nothing. Natona states are something quite new and those tests can only tell you that you are like most people in some country. No who are you.

But in case you want to speculate, it is possible that it is actually Greek in origin. Not only because the Turkey of today is in the lands of Byzantium. A few centuries ago, the natons meant nothing, but religion was the big problem. I am Bulgarian. During the Ottoman rule… hm… the laws were different for Muslims and non-Muslims. And at one point there were (debatable how and if it was enforced) Islamization campaigns in the regions of present-day Bulgaria and Greece. By force, for profit or other reason, some Christian peoples and communities converted to Islam. The problem for them had been that, after conversion, both Christians and Muslims condemned or at least disturbed them as traitors. Those people are still known as pomaks and still live more or less in isolation (they are no longer condemned,

If you are Muslim and don't want to get caught in the middle, you can (some still do) just change the location to a place where people don't know you and declare yourself a Turk. There are no obvious racial differences and it works. In theory, some of your granaprents may have done it without bragging about it too much.

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