My employer discovered that a competitor approached me and offered to match any offer I received. I decided to stay and now they refuse to fulfill their promise of a raise. That I have to do?

Updated on : January 21, 2022 by Callum Wright



My employer discovered that a competitor approached me and offered to match any offer I received. I decided to stay and now they refuse to fulfill their promise of a raise. That I have to do?

As others have said, leaving is your best course of action because A) your employers already know you were considering it and B) they are not honoring a written agreement with you. How can you trust them again?

Following legal action is a lost proposition. You don't want to stay there if you win, and it can make it difficult to find a job elsewhere later on.

Instead, get on with your job and take the time to do a proper job search elsewhere. If you don't like the other place that came to you, don't go there, but find a place that you like. Then go there.

Doing the job search while still

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As others have said, leaving is your best course of action because A) your employers already know you were considering it and B) they are not honoring a written agreement with you. How can you trust them again?

Following legal action is a lost proposition. You don't want to stay there if you win, and it can make it difficult to find a job elsewhere later on.

Instead, get on with your job and take the time to do a proper job search elsewhere. If you don't like the other place that came to you, don't go there, but find a place that you like. Then go there.

Doing the job search while you are still employed is important - it has much more influence and is more desirable to potential employers if you are currently employed. Also, when talking to employers, emphasize positive draws, not anything that keeps you from your current job. For example, you are excited about your business and want to join your company, and you are ready for a change.

Sorry to hear about your current employer and good luck!

Since you have disclosed your intentions to your current employer, there is little chance of continuing to work if there is more than constant stress and fear. You may have a counter offer on hand, but in time they will find a way to replace it. Chances are they didn't care if you stayed long term, they just didn't want to lose someone during a critical business moment. It's disgusting, but that's the job market sometimes.

If the competitor is still interested, reach out to him and renegotiate or accept the offer if it is still on the table. At least you can start from scratch somewhere new.

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Since you have disclosed your intentions to your current employer, there is little chance of continuing to work if there is more than constant stress and fear. You may have a counter offer on hand, but in time they will find a way to replace it. Chances are they didn't care if you stayed long term, they just didn't want to lose someone during a critical business moment. It's disgusting, but that's the job market sometimes.

If the competitor is still interested, reach out to him and renegotiate or accept the offer if it is still on the table. At least you will be able to start from scratch somewhere new without the stress and fear. You will also have a new experience that will help you make better decisions when you decide to look for a new job in the future.

Has your strategy ever worked for someone? This would never work. When you were discovered looking for another job in the competitor's house, you already lost respect. Now, the time they are taking to keep you cheated in the company is queen, they are trying to find a way to solve it.

HR 101. Never accept a counter offer. You have revealed your disloyalty. They will never trust you again.

You must go. If he didn't want the other offer, he should have kept his mouth shut.

In the 70s, it was quite common to leave a job for a year or two and be hired again with a salary that would be much more than what you would be given if you had stayed.

Call an attorney and determine if the counteroffer you have in writing is enforceable. If so, a short note from your attorney to your employer should provide you with a raise. If not, your options are to brag (including a slightly different note from your attorney) or forget about it.

If the increase is on the order of 10%, it is probably not worth it. If it's closer to 50%, you should probably go.

Leave as soon as you can ... this is called dishonesty. They needed you to refuse and stay with them for whatever reason, but they achieved that goal by lying.

Talk to the competitor to see if the offer is still on the table, if so, leave immediately.

Your best option is to leave. Your loyalty score goes from 100 to 1 when your employer knows about that offer. They will always doubt your loyalty from now on.

Speaking as a person who has been there and has also seen more than a few friends in the same position, here is what I will say: the closest thing to a hard and fast rule in this situation is to NEVER accept a counter offer. Just don't do it. I will give you several reasons, in no particular order.

  1. You went looking for work for a reason. You are dissatisfied. That is not going to change now, even with a honeymoon period.
  2. The honeymoon period is an anomaly. Whatever the reason, it will be reversed. Overworked and overwhelmed? They may provide some relief, but gradually more will accumulate. Low paid? Them
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Speaking as a person who has been there and has also seen more than a few friends in the same position, here is what I will say: the closest thing to a hard and fast rule in this situation is to NEVER accept a counter offer. Just don't do it. I will give you several reasons, in no particular order.

  1. You went looking for work for a reason. You are dissatisfied. That is not going to change now, even with a honeymoon period.
  2. The honeymoon period is an anomaly. Whatever the reason, it will be reversed. Overworked and overwhelmed? They may provide some relief, but gradually more will accumulate. Low paid? They will eventually get those extra dollars out of you. Political infighting or other assorted garbage? It will not die just because you took a position, it will only be inactive for a while.
  3. You need to ask why what was previously a problem wasn't important enough to be addressed before you threatened to leave. Typically, a company that values ​​a key employee will see these issues or listen when a concern is raised.
  4. Now that they know you considered leaving, they will suspect that you will want to do it again. They will most likely try to document and find out everything they need so that it is no longer essential. It could be anywhere from a few months to several years, but now you'll be on top management's hard-hitting list, and they might even begin to actively seek a reason to get rid of you in retaliation.
  5. It will definitely burn a major bridge in the new company. They will feel that you led them. Professional communities tend to be smaller than they appear. Also, what if the person who hired you goes elsewhere and you apply for your new company? Good luck in that situation.

In all, cut your losses, be polite but political, and state that you are committed to the new company now. This is like a milder form of an abusive relationship and they are unlikely to change.

Update: over 1.1K upvotes, wow! As just the occasional Quora poster, I feel quite excited. I'm also somewhat puzzled that this answer hit a nerve for both people who agreed and disagreed with me in the comments. For those of you who disagree, I'll just say that statistically, when you play blackjack, you don't hit 17, regardless of how your friend fared that time.

What would you do if your boss offered you a big pay raise after you quit?

Your boss would be foolish to offer a "huge" raise because when word got out, half the department would be in line demanding raises. However, I will answer the question as it was asked.

If you have made a commitment to another company, you must respect it and leave. In reality, you may want to work for that company one day and it is unlikely that you will get a second job offer at a later time if you do not meet your commitment now. Also, you should never play that game to get a raise. If it does, b

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What would you do if your boss offered you a big pay raise after you quit?

Your boss would be foolish to offer a "huge" raise because when word got out, half the department would be in line demanding raises. However, I will answer the question as it was asked.

If you have made a commitment to another company, you must respect it and leave. In reality, you may want to work for that company one day and it is unlikely that you will get a second job offer at a later time if you do not meet your commitment now. Also, you should never play that game to get a raise. If you do, you will be the first person to be "laid off" when the company has to downsize its workforce during the next downtime. Also, guess who will get all the "horrible" allowances and minimum wage increases after that.

Unless your boss is a lying jerk and backstabbing, it's usually worth being honest up front ... not that you're in the job market and may quit soon, but that you need more money. For example, while handing out Hershey bars to celebrate the new twins, you might mention that you really feel blessed, but that you might have to take a second job to support them. Also, you should talk to your boss, perhaps during the annual review time or another convenient time, and ask directly if there are additional responsibilities you can take on to earn more money. It is never wise to threaten to quit unless you get a raise, or let it be known that you are looking for another job. But it never hurts to drop a few clues and also ask your boss directly for a path to a higher salary. (This approach also covers your boss with the other employees, that is, more work = more money.) Everyone wins.

Smart bosses are very reluctant to lose good employees if they have the budget and resources to keep them happy, and they are too shortsighted to pay less than the market price. In other words, a good manager will make it as difficult as possible for a productive and valued employee to find a "better deal" elsewhere.

For their part, smart employees don't burn bridges with unprofessional behavior when they leave a company. We never know when we will have to go back to our old company, or when we might meet our old boss at a different company.

Hi there.

I would not recommend going that way. Accepting or rejecting a counter offer from your boss is your decision, which depends on a couple of factors.

a. Did you ask for a raise before looking for a new job?

If you did and your boss declined or postponed the talk to a later date due to some excuse, I will advise you not to accept the raise. Why? Because it is very likely that your boss wants to hold you for some time and extract the remaining profit that you can contribute before letting you go. If you are a former employee of the company (more than one year), then you will

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Hi there.

I would not recommend going that way. Accepting or rejecting a counter offer from your boss is your decision, which depends on a couple of factors.

a. Did you ask for a raise before looking for a new job?

If you did and your boss declined or postponed the talk to a later date due to some excuse, I will advise you not to accept the raise. Why? Because it is very likely that your boss wants to hold you for some time and extract the remaining profit that you can contribute before letting you go. If you are a former employee of the company (more than a year), leaving them will create a gap in the profit-making chain.

The highest bid, in this case, is a small temporary investment until it is no longer needed.

B. Is the raise offered by your boss 30% or more?

The commonly accepted corporate culture is to get a 25-30% increase in your salary while changing jobs. Of course, there are several where you can even get 50% and even 100% salary increases. However, the average rate is 25-30%.

There can be 2 scenarios here.

  • He took another job offer that didn't bring him a very good raise in salary, but the work culture looks authentic and promising for a career in construction. Now your current boss is giving you a nominal raise in salary that turns out to be more than the offer you have.
  • You took another offer for a 30% pay raise and now your current boss is ready to offer you a 30% raise.

In the first scenario, do not accept the counter offer. A couple thousand rupees more at the expense of your peace of mind is not worth it. You accepted another offer without a noticeable raise, which means you want to leave your current workplace. Don't fall into the higher salary trap and get stuck there.

If you have the second option, carefully evaluate your choice. Compare the following parameters:

  • Age of the company (older companies have a reputation in the market and are stable).
  • Income generation in the last 5 years (higher income means that the company does good business and promises a growing career).
  • Glassdoor Reviews (Anonymous review feature allows everyone to post honest reviews. Review all reviews and weigh your opinion.)
  • Service-based versus product-based (product-based companies offer more learning opportunities than service-based companies).
  • Work culture (you know your organization and you must have noticed something when you went to interview the other).

Once you've thought through all of these questions carefully, make your choice.

I hope this helps.

This is a risky game. Consider these points when creating your plan:

Almost everyone who accepts a counter offer leaves within 6 months.

  • I have seen the statistic vary from 60% to 80%. That's crazy!
  • With current laws transforming compensation processes and no one can ask for your current compensation, this salary increase no longer gives you more bargaining power.

What you are looking for can make a difference.

  • If you are not satisfied with your boss, the company, etc., you will never be there.
  • If you think you are being paid poorly or see different titles elsewhere you want, find an accountant or
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This is a risky game. Consider these points when creating your plan:

Almost everyone who accepts a counter offer leaves within 6 months.

  • I have seen the statistic vary from 60% to 80%. That's crazy!
  • With current laws transforming compensation processes and no one can ask for your current compensation, this salary increase no longer gives you more bargaining power.

What you are looking for can make a difference.

  • If you are not satisfied with your boss, the company, etc., you will never be there.
  • If you think you are being paid poorly or see different titles in other places you want, looking for a counter offer can be a good wake-up call for your employer. I have seen people in these cases end up happy accepting their accountant and staying.

Matching is tricky - they'll look at you from 3 perspectives, so learn about their philosophy and what matters.

  1. Equity between offers.
  2. Your value to the company.
  3. Equity between the team.

The most rigid and data-driven companies tend to consider only fairness between offerings. These are often larger companies, and sometimes you will have to prove that the new overall package is more valuable, i.e. salary, benefits, license, etc. will add it all up. Some companies won't care if the basis is more because their philosophy is based more on equity, or full compensation, or whatever the case may be. Some are so rigid in this regard that if you can't show it they will let you walk.

Similarly, there is a risk that you will leave and start in a new and unfamiliar place. Some companies may play hard and offer you an accountant, but not completely match your new offer, taking this risk into account.

Your value to them will be the deciding factor for most companies. Your case for an accountant started on day 1. Has it proven so valuable that you can't imagine getting lost? Or could they just go ahead and hire someone else to do the work? Recognizing competitive offers is risky for the organization. If word gets out, that can affect employee motivations, loyalty, and the entire compensation culture there.

Finally, fairness between the team is an important legal consideration. The purpose of the compensation team, believe it or not, is to be consistent and protect the organization legally as much or even more than it is to attract employees. Employees performing similar functions should receive similar remuneration. His current composition is equitable with the rest of his team. If you're on the lower end, maybe you have more leeway for a counter. If not, your counter may need to include a promotion, new responsibilities, or a different title to allow the company to increase your salary.

*** PRO TIPS:

  • The best way to negotiate is before receiving new offers! Sometimes you can get what you want without assuming your role and appearing unfair. A competitive offer can also make some people defensive. However, if you have proactively filed your case for new compensation and been rejected, they may be more receptive to your competitor's offers later on as they left you no choice.
  • Present your counters as data points, not as a combative take it or leave it, at least to begin with. Your proposition should be about being on the same team, wanting to stay, being loyal, etc., but being rated higher in the market and you need to find a new, mutually beneficial compensation package to stay.

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