Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs fame claims that there are thousands of jobs available in the US But no one will take them. In our capitalist country, doesn't this show that the rate of pay must be increased for these same jobs?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Tom Mcdonald



Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs fame claims that there are thousands of jobs available in the US But no one will take them. In our capitalist country, doesn't this show that the rate of pay must be increased for these same jobs?

I can't help but remember an old friend when I think of these things.

My friend (let's call him Rick) is the son of a welder. Rick used to tell me how much his father wanted to make sure his son didn't follow in his footsteps. Rick's father had arrived in his 50s with joint damage and a collection of other sources of constant low-grade pain that stemmed from years gone by with a torch in hand and hard physical work to do. Oh, he made good money, but he made that money with damages that money cannot repair.

So here we come Rick and I ... He spends a semester or two of community college.

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I can't help but remember an old friend when I think of these things.

My friend (let's call him Rick) is the son of a welder. Rick used to tell me how much his father wanted to make sure his son didn't follow in his footsteps. Rick's father had arrived in his 50s with joint damage and a collection of other sources of constant low-grade pain that stemmed from years gone by with a torch in hand and hard physical work to do. Oh, he made good money, but he made that money with damages that money cannot repair.

So here we come Rick and I ... He spends a semester or two of community college, I spend 4 years getting a bunch of credits that would have been a degree if the degree had not failed accreditation. We both started making money as martial artists, fighters, gorillas ... we started to rack up our own share of damage.

Time passes, at 28 I retire. I can already feel the damage building up. Rick had already left the ring for the factory floor.

It has been almost 12 years since I stopped doing physical work… as I prepare for 40, I am in great shape. I go to sleep at night without pain.

Rick… Rick is doing "dirty work" at a slaughterhouse. She has back and knee problems and that affects the way she plays with her daughter.

Rick wants to make sure his daughter doesn't follow in her father's footsteps.


With all due respect to the esteemed opera singer Mike Rowe, there is something missing in the conversations about salaries and the relative benefits of education.

Part of the reason older generations worked so hard to get their kids out of 'dirty jobs' had nothing to do with prestige ... it had everything to do with pain.

I'm not saying you need a degree to be successful or that I'm better off because I have a glamorous career (go spend a day with me on a call center floor sometime, what I do is not glamorous).

I just want people to remember that life and career decisions are not just equations of dollars and cents.

I also can't help but wonder if Mike Rowe would have the same opinion of these jobs if he had spent the last 20 years doing manual jobs instead of working in front of television cameras. If he had accumulated the damage himself, or if he had seen it accumulate on friends and co-workers.

Food for thought. How much is it worth to be able to pick up your eight-year-old daughter at the end of the day?

Mike Rowe lives like a grunt one day a week. Then he goes back to his millionaire lifestyle to lecture the rest of us on how we should be grateful to break our asses over stagnant wages.

It is a virtue marker of the highest level that aims to extol the virtues of manual labor. However, Mike always knows by the end of the shoot that he can return to his rich and famous lifestyle.

Those are dirty jobs, but someone has to do them. That's true, but I don't appreciate the way the rich lecture the working class about not working enough or not being grateful enough. People who w

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Mike Rowe lives like a grunt one day a week. Then he goes back to his millionaire lifestyle to lecture the rest of us on how we should be grateful to break our asses over stagnant wages.

It is a virtue marker of the highest level that aims to extol the virtues of manual labor. However, Mike always knows by the end of the shoot that he can return to his rich and famous lifestyle.

Those are dirty jobs, but someone has to do them. That's true, but I don't appreciate the way the rich lecture the working class about not working enough or not being grateful enough. People who do forced labor should receive better compensation. Those wages have stagnated over the decades, and that type of work often takes a permanent toll on your body.

And yes, I've heard all the anecdotes about this or that person who skipped the college track and is earning six figures doing a trade. That's amazing and all, but I think it's just as irresponsible to pretend that this is what everyone should expect as irresponsible for people to sell young people with the idea that they should go to college and just get any degree and it will all work out. For one thing, most of these higher paying jobs actually require certification and training, so it's like you're going to college anyway. College prepares you for certain jobs ideally in the same way that certification programs and on-the-job training prepare you for other jobs. Depending on the career or trade to which you dedicate, You can spend several years paying your dues before you make a lot of money. Most of the guys working hard labor aren't making a lot of money. I'd like to take that shit to a shed and finish it off. It's not true and I wish people would stop acting like it is. Most of the hard work does not pay well despite the effort that goes into it. If everyone went into higher-paying skilled labor jobs, they wouldn't pay as much due to supply and demand, and the demand for higher-paying positions often means it's not a realistic recipe for everyone. It's not true and I wish people would stop acting like it is. Most of the hard work does not pay well despite the effort that goes into it. If everyone went into higher-paying skilled labor jobs, they wouldn't pay as much due to supply and demand, and the demand for higher-paying positions often means it's not a realistic recipe for everyone. It's not true and I wish people would stop acting like it is. Most of the hard work does not pay well despite the effort that goes into it. If everyone went into higher-paying skilled labor jobs, they wouldn't pay as much due to supply and demand, and the demand for higher-paying positions often means it's not a realistic recipe for everyone.

I've been there doing that. I have been with others who have. I don't mean to say that there aren't high-paying jobs that don't require college. I'm saying that the way some people are selling it is too black and white and a bit like a big fish tale. Most of the work is not lucrative. Most of the people who work in those places where Mike Rowe goes on vacation don't get much compensation.

If Mike Rowe really gave a shit, he would spend more time advocating for better compensation for that job. If those jobs paid better, perhaps he and his sponsors wouldn't need to run high-production propaganda to try to convince people to take those jobs. Just a thought.

Well, the rate of payment must increase due to inflation (which has already happened, if you have ever taken a look at the cost of goods and services).

And also, there are many jobs that are left vacant every year ... but usually they are not vacated because people are not willing to do them. They are usually there because people can't make them.

Let's say there is a plumbing job (as I checked the other questions) posted. Let's say it's a good rate of pay for the area and it's part-time (since I'm currently looking for a part-time job). Well ... I can't do it. I have no knowledge of

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Well, the rate of payment must increase due to inflation (which has already happened, if you have ever taken a look at the cost of goods and services).

And also, there are many jobs that are left vacant every year ... but usually they are not vacated because people are not willing to do them. They are usually there because people can't make them.

Let's say there is a plumbing job (as I checked the other questions) posted. Let's say it's a good rate of pay for the area and it's part-time (since I'm currently looking for a part-time job). Well ... I can't do it. I have no more complex plumbing skills than having used a bathroom before. I may want to have this plumbing job all I want, but there is literally no way I can have it right now, at least, unless the employer is willing to hire an apprentice or get me hooked up with an apprenticeship program. If the employer is unwilling to wait for you to get very basic training and wants someone right now, then that job will either be filled by someone with that skill or will remain available.

There are more jobs in healthcare than literally any other field because the second-largest population in the US is now older (and that doesn't even apply to all young people facing short-term and long-term conditions) . Depending on the position, your hours can be weird and / or horrible, the pay is fine (but generally peanut for what you're doing), and you'll spend anywhere from a few semesters to a little life at school to get them done. Many places are suffering a lot for nurses and CNAs, and that's reasonable, but do you know which healthcare occupation is the most in demand (and will continue to be)? Phlebotomists: People who draw blood for tests, start IVs, and do hemodialysis treatments. If you have visited a doctor in the last few decades, You will know that a lot of diagnoses begin with blood tests, and if you are dealing with some kind of chronic condition, you know that a person with a chronic condition that is otherwise extremely healthy should have blood tests done at least some times a year (if not more). Is it okay with blood, but not so much on needles? Surgical technicians are in high demand. Crushed by blood? X-ray technicians are also needed. Crushed by blood? X-ray technicians are also needed. Crushed by blood? X-ray technicians are also needed.

There is also a huge shortage of teachers and educational support staff, but for example, if you expect to be paid real money based on your position or have decent insurance (or indeed get a full-time position that provides insurance first), you might want to look for something more respected overall.

There are many jobs that people never consider, and it is not necessarily because, as Rowe seems to be suggesting, no one would deign to do that job; Many people don't know that these jobs exist in the first place!

When was the last time you spoke to an underwater welder? Yes, totally real work; If something is underwater and you need soldering, you need an underwater soldering iron. You have to know how to swim, pass physical fitness tests (which is generally nothing more than a formality), hold your hand slightly steady (that's basically the only requirement to learn to weld).

There is also another little problem that nobody wants to talk about: financial aid. Yeah, I know, "it's there," yeah ... but it sucks (and that's before that particular bubble bursts and our horrible government starts instituting educational austerity). And of course, you can get financial aid for tech schools too! … But the amount of help you get is based on the number of credits you earn. A full-time class schedule is exactly the same as a full-time job in hours, so to get the most out of financial aid, you need to have parents / relatives / guardians / literally anyone to help pay your way (I want That is, unless you want to run up real mountains of debt to pay for your housing and groceries through aid). I am currently in a phlebotomy program and since I am a bit older I decided to take it easy: one class, then two classes, etc. Well, I don't qualify for financial aid. You qualify for financial aid if you go to school full or part time, but not if you are just taking one class. You have to commit a lot, blindly, to various institutions just to start a degree or certificate program! By the time you enter class, your ability to leave that class and pay your aid money back in full evaporates, and it worsens as the semester progresses. It's this crazy game of trying to figure out what the school and the government want, all while trying to get some fucking training that pays the rent! your ability to drop out of that class and pay your aid money back in full evaporates, and worsens as the semester progresses. It's this crazy game of trying to figure out what the school and the government want, all while trying to get some fucking training that pays the rent! your ability to drop out of that class and pay your aid money back in full evaporates, and worsens as the semester progresses. It's this crazy game of trying to figure out what the school and the government want, all while trying to get some fucking training that pays the rent! your ability to drop out of that class and pay your aid money back in full evaporates, and worsens as the semester progresses. It's this crazy game of trying to figure out what the school and the government want, all while trying to get some fucking training that pays the rent! your ability to drop out of that class and pay your aid money back in full evaporates, and worsens as the semester progresses. It's this crazy game of trying to figure out what the school and the government want, all while trying to get some fucking training that pays the rent!

There's another uncomfortable truth, too: “Dirty jobs” are dangerous jobs too, and in a country that would rather hold you hostage for months and years than pay for disability (and be sure to renew all your absurd papers every year!) AND For the benefit of health care, that is not a risk that I am willing to take, and many people are not willing to take that risk either, even if they don't necessarily know very well how and why.

Mike Rowe is right, but these jobs are often left unfilled for a reason.

The top of the list is pay in both salary and hours. Even a reasonable salary of 25 hours a week doesn't pay the bills. Remember McDonalds helped employees with a budget calculator that had a line for you to add up the income from your second job?

Many jobs, especially trades, require a driver's license and often an insured vehicle, the cost of which is often insurmountable when trying to start.

For those who say that people would rather collect welfare than work, they should consider the cost of health insurance.

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Mike Rowe is right, but these jobs are often left unfilled for a reason.

The top of the list is pay in both salary and hours. Even a reasonable salary of 25 hours a week doesn't pay the bills. Remember McDonalds helped employees with a budget calculator that had a line for you to add up the income from your second job?

Many jobs, especially trades, require a driver's license and often an insured vehicle, the cost of which is often insurmountable when trying to start.

For those who say that people prefer to collect welfare than work, they should consider the cost of health insurance for an individual and a family. Trained people who refuse work or carefully regulate their hours do so primarily to retain their Medicaid coverage. Even with the ACA, the cost of health insurance makes the benefit of working a non-starter, especially for families, and is often the cause of people refusing to work. Would you like to endanger your children due to lack or inability to pay for health insurance?

The part about people not showing up and attendance issues is an excuse to cover up mismanagement. When you're starting out and living paycheck to paycheck, replacing an alternator can set you back weeks. It also starts a spiral in which the bill is paid late. This spiral also begins when management cuts hours due to lack of business.

For many people, the attendance problem is often due to a lack of affordable child care services. Subsidized care is scarce with all kinds of obstacles to overcome and long waiting lists. Relying on friends and family is often unstable and when the wheels come off the employee often loses their job.

You're finally seeing the results of Ayn Rand's entrepreneurial mindset due to the long-standing workforce surplus. Employers feel that if you are not grateful for the job, it is your fault. Managers and abusive practices, being held responsible for things over which the employee has no control, hypocrisy ("you have to cover yourself while I go to my son's game and no, you cannot have your mother's 70th birthday free") and " So if you call in sick with the flu, you still need a doctor's note, and when you started we told you there are no sick days. ”They have become obsessed with not having to train people. Ten-year experience and the meme of less than 25, although fun, has some validity. If you have experience,

So yes, many jobs are not being filled, but the causes are many and varied. Raising wages is a partial solution, but as a society we must begin to address all the issues that make it difficult to successfully navigate the job market as an employee.

Yeah, but let's be clear here, I got one of those praised tech jobs. I have been a paramedic for ten years, it is another of those fields where they talk about the scarcity they have. But you know what? It's just a job, it's not a career, and that's the way a lot of these tech jobs are. Many of them are dead ends with little room for professional growth. The overwhelming majority of paramedics remain paramedics rather than promoted to another position, not because they refuse to leave the field, but because there is no room to move forward. Most people who grow professionally do so after leaving MS

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Yeah, but let's be clear here, I got one of those praised tech jobs. I have been a paramedic for ten years, it is another of those fields where they talk about the scarcity they have. But you know what? It's just a job, it's not a career, and that's the way a lot of these tech jobs are. Many of them are dead ends with little room for professional growth. The overwhelming majority of paramedics remain paramedics rather than promoted to another position, not because they refuse to leave the field, but because there is no room to move forward. Most people who grow professionally do so by leaving emergency medical services and going into nursing or firefighting, where there is actually room for professional development. I still remember being a rookie, talking about getting a raise, and an old paramedic told me that he was making the same now as when he started in the 70s. And for many non-union stores, that flat pay curve is still pretty much true. Still, most EMS unions are ultimately toothless, because if you work in the 911 system, you can't go on strike (see Reagan V. ATC workers union). Ten years later, if I see a student or EMT thinking about paramedics, I warn them not to waste time, but to go to the fire or to the infirmary. EMT is a good stepping stone, but being a paramedic is a catch (mainly due to the general lack of part-time doctors, which makes the schedule inflexible, meaning you can say goodbye to your opportunities to go back to physical school) . Is the pay good? Yes, okay, just okay, not great working 72 hours a week, risking my back (1 in 4 EMS workers leave the field early due to back injuries) and being awake at all hours of the night. That flat pay curve is still pretty much true. Still, most EMS unions are ultimately toothless, because if you work in the 911 system, you can't go on strike (see Reagan V. ATC workers union). Ten years later, if I see a student or EMT thinking about paramedics, I warn them not to waste time, but to go to the fire or to the infirmary. EMT is a good stepping stone, but being a paramedic is a catch (mainly due to the general lack of part-time doctors, making the schedule inflexible, meaning you can say goodbye to your opportunities to go back to physical school). Is the pay good? Yeah it's okay, it's just okay, it's not great to work 72 hours a week, risk my back (1 in 4 EMS workers leave the field early due to back injuries), and stay awake at all hours of the night . That flat pay curve is still pretty much true. Still, most EMS unions are ultimately toothless, because if you work in the 911 system, you can't go on strike (see Reagan V. ATC workers union). Ten years later, if I see a student or EMT thinking about paramedics, I warn them not to waste time, but to go to the fire or to the infirmary. EMT is a good stepping stone, But being a paramedic is a scam (mainly due to the general lack of part-time doctors, which makes the schedule inflexible, meaning you can say goodbye to your opportunities to go back to physical school). Is the pay good? Yeah it's okay, it's just okay, it's not great to work 72 hours a week, risk my back (1 in 4 EMS workers leave the field early due to back injuries), and stay awake at all hours of the night . because if you work in the 911 system, you can't go on strike (See Reagan Workers' Union V. ATC). Ten years later, if I see a student or EMT thinking about paramedics, I warn them not to waste time, but to go to the fire or to the infirmary. EMT is a good stepping stone, But being a paramedic is a scam (mainly due to the general lack of part-time doctors, which makes the schedule inflexible, meaning you can say goodbye to your opportunities to go back to physical school). Is the pay good? Yeah it's okay, it's just okay, it's not great to work 72 hours a week, risk my back (1 in 4 EMS workers leave the field early due to back injuries), and stay awake at all hours of the night . because if you work in the 911 system, you can't go on strike (See Reagan Workers' Union V. ATC). Ten years later, if I see a student or EMT thinking about paramedics, I warn them not to waste time, but to go to the fire or to the infirmary. EMT is a good stepping stone, But being a paramedic is a scam (mainly due to the general lack of part-time doctors, which makes the schedule inflexible, meaning you can say goodbye to your opportunities to go back to physical school). Is the pay good? Yeah it's okay, it's just okay, it's not great to work 72 hours a week, risk my back (1 in 4 EMS workers leave the field early due to back injuries), and stay awake at all hours of the night . I warn you not to waste your time, but to go shooting or breastfeeding. EMT is a good stepping stone, but being a paramedic is a catch (mainly due to the general lack of part-time doctors, which makes the schedule inflexible, meaning you can say goodbye to your opportunities to go back to physical school) . Is the pay good? Yeah it's okay, it's just okay, it's not great to work 72 hours a week, risk my back (1 in 4 EMS workers leave the field early due to back injuries), and stay awake at all hours of the night . I warn you not to waste your time, but to go shooting or breastfeeding. EMT is a good stepping stone, but being a paramedic is a catch (mainly due to the general lack of part-time doctors, which makes the schedule inflexible, meaning you can say goodbye to your opportunities to go back to physical school) . Is the pay good? Yes, it's okay, it's just okay, it's not great to work 72 hours a week,

I can't be too negative, my current employer is a small rural ambulance service and they are one of the best places I have ever had the pleasure of working for. The pay is pretty good (for EMS), the stations and equipment are great, and I love that we are treated like family there. I really did find the chicken that lay there, because a lot of ambulance companies just suck. To be honest, I am glad for the life experience I had, but at 30 I am ready to start my career, and for that, I go to college.

In a capitalist country, the rate of pay will not rise beyond what the group of consumers will pay for that labor. So apparently not.

Let's see why that could happen:

Nobody wants to pay an attractive salary. Welcome to the world of hamburger flipping, product picking, many kinds of cleaning jobs, etc. These jobs are generally low-skilled and repetitive, and produce production where price competition is fierce. Paying your burger a decent salary, or a decent salary to the guy who picks the lettuce and tomatoes to put on top of the burger, doesn't happen when people want the cheapest burger.

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In a capitalist country, the rate of pay will not rise beyond what the group of consumers will pay for that labor. So apparently not.

Let's see why that could happen:

Nobody wants to pay an attractive salary. Welcome to the world of hamburger flipping, product picking, many kinds of cleaning jobs, etc. These jobs are generally low-skilled and repetitive, and produce production where price competition is fierce. Paying your burger a decent wage, or a decent wage to the guy who picks up the lettuce and tomatoes to put on top of the burger, doesn't happen when people want the cheapest burger they can get. Raising the minimum wage for everyone can help, but of course what we see here is people giving jobs to illegals who they can pay less than the minimum wage under the table, or automating them entirely.

Not enough people have what it takes for the job. Living alone, or in the company of a small group of people, on fire watch in a remote forest, on a ranch, on a fishing boat at sea, requires a certain set of personal qualities to be tolerable. More money for jobs like this only means more stakeholders, who run out after a short time and end up creating problems, not solving them.

Don't get out of one piece. Some of those jobs - like being on the fishing boat, working in construction, being a welder or machinist, and many contact sports - can pay pretty well, but the price for them is usually a short career and a lot of physical damage. Knee, back and joint problems are endemic to many of these jobs, even when they are going well. If they go wrong, you have the kind of accidents that leave one without eyes or limbs, or permanently injured in some other way. How high does this job have to climb to be worth the constant pain at 35?

There are no significant chances of winning the economic lottery. There are many mid-level support jobs that don't require crazy skills or an advanced degree - being a paralegal instead of a lawyer, an HVAC technician instead of a mechanical engineer, etc. The "problem" is that while these jobs may make you comfortable, they won't make you rich. Many Americans would like to bet on (or think they are aiming for) the moon, not "just getting a job."

There is not enough prestige. Pay is part of what makes the world go round, but so is social status. Many jobs that pay well enough are treated as undesirable because they don't come with enough bragging rights. And in a culture like the American one, where your job is who you are, as well as what you do, that's a big problem.

Original question:

Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs fame claims that there are thousands of jobs available in the US But no one will take them. In our capitalist country, doesn't this show that the rate of pay must be increased for these same jobs?

One of the main problems is not the pay rate, it is the mindset to do manual labor. From kindergarten onward, he has instilled in our heads that you can only be successful with a college degree and a desk job. When I was in high school in the 60s, every school had trade classes. Metal shop, wood shop, auto repair, my school even had industrial glass blowing. But even then his grades and test scores would put him on the path of life. High grades would help you get into the college prep group. They would tell you that you are college material. You need to buckle up and upload your grades to get i

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One of the main problems is not the pay rate, it is the mindset to do manual labor. From kindergarten onward, he has instilled in our heads that you can only be successful with a college degree and a desk job. When I was in high school in the 60s, every school had trade classes. Metal shop, wood shop, auto repair, my school even had industrial glass blowing. But even then his grades and test scores would put him on the path of life. High grades would help you get into the college prep group. They would tell you that you are college material. You need to buckle up and improve your grades to get into a good college. The brainwashing continues today. I screwed up big this summer entering my sophomore year. I got a job as an electrician's assistant. I loved the job. In addition to doing manual labor, I found that a lot of mental effort was required. By the end of the summer, he was designing jobs, writing estimates as well as doing the actual wiring. When September comes, I will see my boss to give him 2 weeks notice. He sat me down and told me how good he was as an electrician. Then he said don't go back to college, stay and become an apprentice with him. He said that in a year I would have my officer's license, in two years I would be a teacher. Then to really try to lure me in, he said he would retire in 5 years and give me his business, lock, stocks, and barrel. I asked to sleep on it. When I told my dad the offer, he said son, you've been working toward a degree since elementary school, you'd be the first college graduate in the family. The next day I gave myself up with resignation. I've done well, but it's nowhere near what I could have done as an electrician. I could have received a payment while learning my trade instead of ending up with college loans to pay off. An electrician starts at $ 85,000 a year, plus benefits.

It takes an idiot, liberal, politician or otherwise to believe that a job that pays what is worth will go unfilled in a country with people who are unemployed and cannot get enough benefits through government and private charity to to live.

I grew up in poverty, and my entire family in the older generations grew up in poverty, but half of my generation reached the middle and professional classes, like myself. I know countless people who are crippled from doing hard and dangerous work, and I used to know some who died young as a result of doing that work.

I've been to jobs where they killed people

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It takes an idiot, liberal, politician or otherwise to believe that a job that pays what is worth will go unfilled in a country with people who are unemployed and cannot get enough benefits through government and private charity to to live.

I grew up in poverty, and my entire family in the older generations grew up in poverty, but half of my generation reached the middle and professional classes, like myself. I know countless people who are crippled from doing hard and dangerous work, and I used to know some who died young as a result of doing that work.

I've been in jobs where people were killed, because even though I'm a well-educated professional, when I choose to be, I'm also a born and raised redneck, working in construction, manufacturing, agriculture, and auto repair. I was a certified welder at one point, a commercial driver at another.

Employers pay enough to fill those positions if they REALLY want them filled. OTHERWISE, your complaints are crocodile tears, hypocritical nonsense.

Conservatives tend to believe such nonsense, because they believe that we have millions and millions of wellness mooches. We have welfare mooches, but probably only ten percent of what most Trump and bau-type conservatives THINK we have, or pretend we have.

I know some wellness mooches personally. Some of them are related. They collect some benefits and work some under the table. I also know people on the government payroll who do not earn fifty percent of what they are paid.

Liberals also tend to believe such nonsense because they want to, because it suits their personal agenda to believe it.

The SOLUTION to problems like workplace injuries and low wages is a combination of higher wages and better safety and other workplace regulations.

We need both HIGHER WAGES and BETTER WORKING CONDITIONS. If employers are forced to pay for the suffering of their employees as a result of being overworked or injured on the job, then they will turn things around so that their employees don't have to work as hard and are not likely to get hurt.

Of course, the usual Trump / Business AS Republicans don't want to pay more and don't want to treat their employees better.

I have ALSO come to realize that well-behaved liberals don't want to pay a penny more than they have to pay for the job they hire.

My dentist probably makes three hundred thousand dollars. He says he can't afford to pay more than ten or twelve dollars to hire a local guy to do his yard work ...... I guess he's having trouble keeping up with his top-of-the-line Mercedes payments or something like that, and her five hundred grand house that overlooks the golf course behind her. He has an Obama sticker on his old car and an HRC sticker on his newest one that he drives to his office these days.

The liberal Democratic establishment IS in favor of higher wages and better working conditions, but it is not powerful enough for laws and regulations to be put in place to END the treatment of this problem.

The problem is not as serious as it used to be. Pick any particular industry today, and it will almost certainly be safer and easier to work in than it was fifty years ago, although real pay has often dropped substantially.

I know, because back then I was working in agriculture, manufacturing, garages, construction, and the like, and I knew more people doing that kind of work than I knew were doing skull jobs in offices.

I never wanted a mainstream career, and I kept doing commercial work, every once in a while, and farm work, every once in a while, until I retired, and I'm still in agriculture, construction, welding, ripping, and even logging, on my own farm. .

My next door neighbor, who is younger and still farming, has cab tractors, automatic transmissions, air suspension seats, air conditioning, roll cages, seat belts, etc. My old tractors don't have any of these things. It provides accommodation to its employees throughout the year…. Better home than the house I grew up in. The law REQUIRES that your tenants' houses be structurally sound, have functional plumbing in both the kitchen and bathroom, etc. a spring two hundred meters away, and the day, a year later, we got a PUMP for the well, and a couple of years later, when we got an INDOOR TOILET.

You WILL NOT FIND a new dump truck on a dealer lot that does not have power brakes, power steering, air conditioning, seat belts, etc. Fifty years ago, these things were more the exception than the rule.

I live in Oklahoma, but close to Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas, so all of these areas and people blend into my region. My son is a “millennial,” so I have come into contact with many between the ages of 18 and 26. Like much of Central America, we have countless small towns and cities filled with young men and women who cannot afford college, or will not go into debt for life for it, or who cannot afford to live while attending college. college, or they are simply not academically oriented or interested. I guess this is actually the majority of the common population.

Many of these people would love one or

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I live in Oklahoma, but close to Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas, so all of these areas and people blend into my region. My son is a “millennial,” so I have come into contact with many between the ages of 18 and 26. Like much of Central America, we have countless small towns and cities filled with young men and women who cannot afford college, or will not go into debt for life for it, or who cannot afford to live while attending college. college, or they are simply not academically oriented or interested. I guess this is actually the majority of the common population.

Many of these people would love a chance at the kinds of jobs Mike Rowe talks about, especially young men. Here's the problem: where the heck are they? Because most of them are apparently not here. And if they are here, or wherever they are, how do the locals find them? Because schools are not interested in anything more than selling you the university. And there seem to be no ads for these on the many major online services (after spending months looking at the ones in my region, I haven't noticed them anyway).

Here's what it takes to get the many people who WANT the jobs to the jobs: A core list - perhaps the feds would be kind enough to do such a thing - for jobs that don't require college or only require a minimum certificate of some . kind as you can get with 1 or 2 classes on a votech or jr. University (and sometimes a drug test, although doing this so that marijuana is not an prohibition factor, only other drugs, would help tremendously) - where the company, if you interview you by phone / video and hire from afar, is willing to pay for your initial travel and accommodation, perhaps with the agreement that it will be reimbursed over time, assuming the job works.

Yes, this puts them at risk of losing a little money, but it also gives them the advantage of getting employees who (a) cared enough to leave their home and go find it and (b) now in a new place without a safety net. of existing family / friends are more likely to work hard and suffer more stoically, and (c) as a result of both, they are more likely to be longer-term employees. At this point, Rowe says they can't find employees period, so this opportunity is certainly better than that.

There are tons of people who want those jobs but have no idea where they are, how to find them, and they probably can't afford to just travel and stay in another state to do them, making the jobs inaccessible even. if they find a list somewhere. If someone really WANTED to solve this problem for companies and for people, this is not very difficult to solve in a good% of the above.

I remember a few years ago when the employment office called me to send me for an interview. It was a factory setup, I needed 3 years of welding experience plus a certificate of completion from an accredited vocational school. The job was at least 50 hours a week and paid a total of $ 12.50 per hour. The employment office considered that because I am a veteran, I could get the job even without the required skill set.

For starters, I did it twenty years ago, and I'm not talking about adjusted earnings, I'm chatting with real money. I am not a welder. It would easily have been, $ 12.50 wouldn't even be enough for me t

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I remember a few years ago when the employment office called me to send me for an interview. It was a factory setup, I needed 3 years of welding experience plus a certificate of completion from an accredited vocational school. The job was at least 50 hours a week and paid a total of $ 12.50 per hour. The employment office considered that because I am a veteran, I could get the job even without the required skill set.

For starters, I did it twenty years ago, and I'm not talking about adjusted earnings, I'm chatting with real money. I am not a welder. It would easily have been, $ 12.50 wouldn't even be enough for me to get started, welders start higher than that and increase with experience. While I could go to college, it is an investment in my component and I think like an investor. It is easy that you do not see enough potential return for the financial investment, perhaps you are not making the financial investment.

Also, I consider overtime to be problematic. I am willing to work my forty hours, but for that, I exchange our time for money. Within my spare time, I work on my vehicle, work around the house, rewire, plumbing, whatever it takes. I easily need to pay someone else to get that job, I have to earn enough to cover those expenses and still generate income. I don't get a mechanic for less than $ 60 / hour, similar to an electrician or plumbing professional. My overtime pay will have to take around $ 90 / hour to cover additional expenses and just cover expenses.

I decided to go to college so that I didn't have to work long hours at a back-breaking job. I know exactly how difficult it is for the office on accounts payable and how much more it pays. Do you need to work harder? I have to see more income. Are you asking me to invest in a new skill? Okay, but I need to see enough money to pay that cost and discover a financial return on investment.

Pay is a part of the puzzle, worker care is a more important part.

I believed a lot in business skills when I was 20 years old, to the point that I learned one. I got a job as an inspector and field technician for a natural gas company. It was an interesting and difficult job and one of the best options for not wasting physical resources. However, it did involve working with oil and gas people.

Short version of the story: the job no longer exists. The company did nothing to protect the employees and when they lost the contract they made sure that we could not even enjoy basic unemployment protection. This is consistent

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Pay is a part of the puzzle, worker care is a more important part.

I believed a lot in business skills when I was 20 years old, to the point that I learned one. I got a job as an inspector and field technician for a natural gas company. It was an interesting and difficult job and one of the best options for not wasting physical resources. However, it did involve working with oil and gas people.

Short version of the story: the job no longer exists. The company did nothing to protect the employees and when they lost the contract they made sure that we could not even enjoy basic unemployment protection. This is consistent with other companies in the blue-collar field I worked for, only this time it gave me a nervous breakdown. In addition, I was one of the only insured workers and I found out why: my disability insurance did not cover the breakdown caused by my former company.

There is no financial benefit to working for a company that will exhaust the worker and provide no back-end support. I have seen more people than I would like to enter who end up disabled because that is the attitude of the workers; employees are disposable.

Now I am training to work white collar, which I can do even if I get sick. My future employers are extremely concerned about my health, because they will be very interested in me.

Mike Rowe has done manual labor with the pleasure of not being there for abuse. You show up and try a job, but don't suffer the financial stress of needing the company to protect you and not having it happen. He is misinformed.

The jobs may be there, but people like me will never work them. An industry advertises itself by the way it treats its workers. The software industry, the medical industry, and academia care a lot about employees because those skills are so important. The construction, oil and gas, manufacturing, and retail industries have relied on people who have no influence to bargain better.

I don't understand the economics of working for decades at hard manual labor only to end up unable to use my hands or in chronic pain. That is a huge price to pay for someone like me.

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