May I consider wearing a black shirt (no jacket or coat) as formal office wear?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Bailey Baker



May I consider wearing a black shirt (no jacket or coat) as formal office wear?

Yes, of course, you
can easily wear a black shirt to the office. It looks really smart and you can style it without. of various combinations. Whether they are gray, black or brown pants.
The black shirt looks good in all colors and in all.
I will show you several options for wearing a black shirt.

Happy Styling !!!

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Yes, of course, you
can easily wear a black shirt to the office. It looks really smart and you can style it without. of various combinations. Whether they are gray, black or brown pants.
The black shirt looks good in all colors and in all.
I will show you several options for wearing a black shirt.

Happy Styling !!!

Wearing only a shirt of any color is not formal attire. Depending on your organization's guidelines for your employees, you can wear solid black with a pair of jeans. You can also go for the steel gray or burgundy tie and gray pants.

Yes
As long as the fabric is cotton, linen, a synthetic blend where there is nothing in the garment.
The pants with which you are going to combine it are of a very neutral or soft tone, such as a lighter gray or a pair of super light chinos.

Of course he can!! I work with Deloitte and people DO come to the office without blazers and without a black shirt.

A blazer can be kept for pleasant days like conferences and corporate meetings!

Of course, friend, make sure to take that into account in the kind of office decorum you have.

Regardless, black is a classic formal and party color.

According to me, yes. It looks really great. You can also consider the idea of ​​wearing a tie.

Yes you can, but to make it formal, not shiny or shiny like the one with a fine stain.

Yes, it might be possible to find someone who could create clothes from your ideas, but I suspect those people are extremely rare. Sewing is not as popular as 40 years ago, although it has had a resurgence since March 2020 due to mask making, but there is a big difference in one's ability to make fairly simple masks versus more complex clothing or alterations. vs being able to make clothes from an idea without a pattern.

I've been sewing and altering for over 40 years, and I've made simple clothing without a pattern, but nothing fancy. I would probably not address a request to make someone's clothes

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Yes, it might be possible to find someone who could create clothes from your ideas, but I suspect those people are extremely rare. Sewing is not as popular as 40 years ago, although it has had a resurgence since March 2020 due to mask making, but there is a big difference in one's ability to make fairly simple masks versus more complex clothing or alterations. vs being able to make clothes from an idea without a pattern.

I've been sewing and altering for over 40 years, and I've made simple clothing without a pattern, but nothing fancy. I would probably not approach a request to make clothes from someone's ideas, because I would not know the final cost and I already have a sewing business where I know how much to charge for common requests. I don't take work unless someone is willing to pay my reasonable fees, but even reasonable fees can add up. The more complex an application is, the more it costs. I do mostly alterations and repairs, although some custom requests. I tell people that it may be cheaper to buy a ready-to-use replacement item that fits than to pay me to have it modified, repaired or custom made, because I cannot compete with the labor and material rates in the Foreign.

It's a challenge to make complex clothing without a pattern without training (or trial and error experience). If your ideas involve baggy clothing, it is easier than tight clothing. If you want tight-fitting clothes and your friends come in different shapes and sizes, you'll want someone with experience creating patterns or who knows how to fit a pattern (own, store bought, or mixed) for different body shapes and sizes.

If you are in a city or town that has a school that offers specializations in textiles and fashion, that would be a good place to start! If you are on a budget, a student will likely be able to work for less than someone with more experience, such as an instructor, who will likely provide you with a higher quality, but at a higher cost. The next place to ask for recommendations would be a fabric store like JoAnn's, or call local tailors.

When it comes to a dark gray suit, I think it's an excellent choice. it is appropriate both day and night.

On the subject of ties ... well, it's more complicated. I would personally avoid a black tie, but that's because I don't like wearing it. Also, a silk tie in black can look shiny in most light (polyester even more), and glitter is something I avoid even more strongly than black clothing.

Carolyn Cho points out in her response that black ties can seem too formal. Although I am not proud of that, I can also tell you from personal experience that in some professions where to use

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When it comes to a dark gray suit, I think it's an excellent choice. it is appropriate both day and night.

On the subject of ties ... well, it's more complicated. I would personally avoid a black tie, but that's because I don't like wearing it. Also, a silk tie in black can look shiny in most light (polyester even more), and glitter is something I avoid even more strongly than black clothing.

Carolyn Cho points out in her response that black ties can seem too formal. Although I am not proud of it, I can also tell you from personal experience that in some professions where wearing a tie is common (i.e. finance), it can also be ridiculed. In a previous career, a former colleague wore a patterned black tie, and from then on, he could never escape the jokes about being the investment banker who dressed as a waiter. Yes, I know ... Bankers can be elitists, real jerks. If OP intends to interview for a position at a finance company, black ties are a big no-no.

As for which ties to wear, I would limit it to a handful of colors:

  • Dark red / maroon (i.e. not scarlet, an interview is not a Christmas party)
  • Blue
  • Orange (not too bright)

I would avoid yellow, green, or pink / purple. Yellow because it is simplistic and not assertive as a color, or because it is very striking and attracts attention. Green, pink and purple because they are not that common and can attract attention.

If you have patterned ties, I would suggest something that is not too daring or looks expensive. Again, if OP is interviewing for a finance job, those folks may spot the distinctive elaborate patterns on a Ferragamo or Hermes tie from a mile away (as they usually have a fancy dress themselves) and may not be able to find them. impress that a candidate believes that it is appropriate to do so. Wear a $ 400 tie for an interview, especially for a junior or entry level position.

Geometric patterns, plaid patterns, maybe some dot patterns if the colors are quite subdued (i.e. dull red on a blue background), knitted ties ... all can work well as long as you keep the colors subdued and not too noticeable. I would highly suggest avoiding paisley patterned ties for an interview.

The point in all of this extensive discussion about ties is really to add to Garrick Saito's answer: you want the interview to be about you. Your personality, your qualifications, your experience ... You want these things to define you plus your resume, not what you are wearing, and anything that attracts attention, even for two seconds, can be distracting and divert or skew the interviewer. When it comes to clothing decisions, the safest bet is to be the candidate who dresses conservatively but stands out for personality and value, rather than being the one who is memorable for dressing distinctively but not standing by. the height of the exaggerations his clothing suggested.

Only the vest or wear a vest with your suit or a jacket? Like?

There is no reason why you can't. It's not my style, but I'm not going to dismiss the idea as I would with a black suit or brown shoes with black pants.

Ideally, you should wear a strange vest, not one that makes you look like you're wearing one from your suit or makes you look like a waiter.

It should always be buttoned (except for the bottom button). It should not be too short and extend just past your belt.

I would also say that for me it would work better if the back fabric matched the front fabric. This will give you the imprint.

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Only the vest or wear a vest with your suit or a jacket? Like?

There is no reason why you can't. It's not my style, but I'm not going to dismiss the idea as I would with a black suit or brown shoes with black pants.

Ideally, you should wear a strange vest, not one that makes you look like you're wearing one from your suit or makes you look like a waiter.

It should always be buttoned (except for the bottom button). It should not be too short and extend just past your belt.

I would also say that for me it would work better if the back fabric matched the front fabric. This will give the impression of a stand-alone vest versus a Bemberg backing found on vests intended to be worn under a jacket (the same fabric as your suit jacket lining).

I think it works well with the sleeves rolled up.

You just don't end up looking like this:

Wearing all black gives a certain perception that you are too bold or domineering and boring enough to talk too

When you are in an interview session, it is supposed to be a very short relationship and include the persuasion technique and the colors really influence the other party.

For example, if you want to look professional and be able to get people talking to you, wear a pastel blue or baby blue shirt.

If you want to deal with female clients, use somewhat more feminine colors like baby pink, baby purple, or any pastel color.

If you want to dominate any presentation or debate, use red colors to give a subtle message

Keep reading

Wearing all black gives a certain perception that you are too bold or domineering and boring enough to talk too

When you are in an interview session, it is supposed to be a very short relationship and include the persuasion technique and the colors really influence the other party.

For example, if you want to look professional and be able to get people talking to you, wear a pastel blue or baby blue shirt.

If you want to deal with female clients, use somewhat more feminine colors like baby pink, baby purple, or any pastel color.

If you want to dominate any presentation or discussion, use red colors to give a subtle message that you are in charge of the situation.

Keep in mind that when applying for a job or in the interview session, do not wear red or flashy colors because it shows that you are too strong to apply for the job (it depends on the types of jobs you are applying for).

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