Job seekers who dropped out of an interview before it ended, why did they do so?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Nylah Wolf



Job seekers who dropped out of an interview before it ended, why did they do so?

"Everyone starts out in sales and then after six months or two years they go back to interview for the position."

So what happened to that? Well, let's first explain how I got there.

Look, I'm still in college and I could use a high paying job right now. So I spend time on job boards and do what job seekers do. Except I have trouble getting interviews, so my method has been to throw it on the wall and see what sticks.

He had originally applied for a position of "executive assistant to the CEO." That basically means I would be a glorified secretary, which is something I'm really good at and qualified at.

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"Everyone starts out in sales and then after six months or two years they go back to interview for the position."

So what happened to that? Well, let's first explain how I got there.

Look, I'm still in college and I could use a high paying job right now. So I spend time on job boards and do what job seekers do. Except I have trouble getting interviews, so my method has been to throw it on the wall and see what sticks.

He had originally applied for a position of "executive assistant to the CEO." That basically means I would be a glorified secretary, which is something I'm really good at and qualified for. I looked at the duties to make sure they didn't put me in another position and they lined up with what I expected out of the position. And the catch is that there were no "other tasks assigned", which means that the description would have been the scope of my work and nothing more.

So after applying, I waited about three days and lost hope and subsequently applied for it at a bunch of other places. I got the callback and answered the phone interview questions and a Zoom interview was set up and they gave me a link.

I opened the link on the day it was scheduled and I was hoping to be on a one-on-one video call, dressed well for the occasion, had my resume in hand and my list of questions ready to answer so I could ask them in just the right time. What followed was incredible.

I sat through a sales pitch to work for the company that was not just me, but a group of other people as well. I heard how it worked and the pyramid scheme was designed. It was time to ask questions and I asked her if she had gotten the wrong link or if something had gone wrong with the setup because she wasn't supposed to be listening to a speech to work in sales. Then they asked me what I was supposed to be there for and I replied that I had applied and was supposed to interview for the executive assistant position.

"Everyone starts in sales and then in six months or two years interviews for the position again."

I politely asked for an explanation of exactly what that meant. It was explained that after getting a specific number of people to join, I would be allowed to re-interview for the position originally applied for and then be considered for that position.

I left the interview pissed off and annoyed I hit the end button (not as satisfying as it would have been to slam the receiver shut). There were still several things to complete in the "interview" and I left when the interviewer was in the middle of the sentence. I called a couple of people to tell them what had just happened and to let all their friends who were looking for work know that the company was a scam.

About a day later the company called me back and woke me up and I was pissed off about it too. They asked me if I was still interested in the position and I politely informed them that I was not going to work for a pyramid scheme. Then the agent tried to explain how it was not a pyramid scheme and started asking me what made me think of that. I cut them in the middle of their sentence and explained that I did not apply for sales and I will not work in sales when applying for an executive assistant position. Then I hung up. I haven't heard from them since.


In fact, I got out of three interviews before they ended. The third time was the strangest and most illegal interview I have ever had ...

I sat down to interview at one of the several food places at the local casino. I wouldn't mind the position at all, but it's the idiot I'd be working for that matters to me.

Now for those of you who have never been an interviewer, there are a number of things you can't ask about and very specific ways you can't ask about something you're not supposed to ask.

We shook hands and began the interview. The first red flag was that I was not interviewing the person I was supposed to interview, but his assistant. It wasn't too big of a red flag, but big enough to raise our guard. Perhaps there was an extenuating circumstance that they had to attend to and were unable to attend.

They asked me about the most recent part of my education and what classes I had found interesting. My response was that I had found my ethics and law classes to be the least and most interesting courses in terms of content, but that I really enjoyed the challenges and had learned quite a bit about them.

Two questions later, "Are you married?" I was a bit dumbfounded. I specifically mention that those two classes are the most educational I've had recently and this question in this essay comes up shortly thereafter. Seriously?

Assistant: Are you married?

Me: You can't ask me that.

A: What do you mean?

M: Asking me that is against the law and against politics. It is discriminatory.

A: Oooookay, have you ever been arrested?

M: That has nothing to do with this position. I am so far off the floor and would have little to no contact with anyone working on the floor. Gambling is not even allowed on this floor.

A: You must answer my questions and not avoid them or tell me why I was wrong in asking them. Are you a citizen of the United States?

M: For your sake, this interview is over. You asked about my education and I replied that law and ethics were two classes that I just finished. Then you ask me three illegal questions. Have a nice day.

He had never interviewed me like this since. That was the worst interview I've literally ever been through. Unsurprisingly, they didn't even offer me the job. There are ways you can ask about those things, but you literally can't do what the interviewer did. You have to ask about those indirectly.


The only other time I got out of an interview was when I was trying to get into one of the dollar stores in my town. I had to travel about 30 minutes to the interview location, which didn't really bother me as it was said that I would have to meet the district manager at a different store. I sat down for the interview and it was surprisingly good until I asked him where he would be doing my training.

They told me I would have to do my training in that store (30 minutes away) or in a store that had no staff. I asked why there was no crew and where it was located (in case it was recently built and I didn't see it). That store was located deep in the bad part of a not-so-nice neighborhood in another city.

I asked him why he couldn't train at the store he was supposed to work in. There was little explanation why he wouldn't be training there. They asked me where it would be more convenient for me to train and I said that I would not be training in either of them when I applied for the job at the place that was less than 3 minutes from my home. They asked me why I would not work at the other store as it was "within my distance requirements". I clearly said that I would not work in a store that got robbed more than once a month (which is true, that store was in the hood and sorry, but I'm pale. They robbed the store once a week.)

I thanked them for their time and left.

I didn't leave a particular interview before it was done. I was looking for the exit closest to the middle.

The interview was supposed to last about an hour and I was scheduled for a Saturday because I had no other time available.

It was for a large company based in Baltimore.

I arrived 10 minutes early, while the gentleman who would be my boss arrived 25 minutes late.

I was interviewing to be his replacement when he would retire in about 2-3 years. Well. It is not a big thing. But when he got the part, I had to think like him. The hair on the back of my neck stood up. Approximately then is when I noticed

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I didn't leave a particular interview before it was done. I was looking for the exit closest to the middle.

The interview was supposed to last about an hour and I was scheduled for a Saturday because I had no other time available.

It was for a large company based in Baltimore.

I arrived 10 minutes early, while the gentleman who would be my boss arrived 25 minutes late.

I was interviewing to be his replacement when he would retire in about 2-3 years. Well. It is not a big thing. But when he got the part, I had to think like him. The hair on the back of my neck stood up. It was then that I realized that he had never looked me in the eye. He always looked at the table and rubbed his nose.

He continued on the division of the large company. The other division was in the money, but this was shoe string budgets in the other division. (Go figure!)

We took a tour of the facility after about 30 minutes of sitting in a conference room. I saw his eyes 4 times during the entire time I was there. (About 3 hours). They were bloodshot and his nose was quite red from rubbing it so much or other problems.

I was looking for the closest exit and a way out of there that wouldn't shoot me later.

When I finally left, I got in the car and ran. All the time trying to figure out what the hell was going on.

I was good friends with the hiring manager at work, so I told her what I saw. (She knew I was watching and was a reference too!) Her first comment: Cocaine. Her husband is a policeman, so she called him and ran past him. Same comment.

When the recruiter called me with a job offer on Tuesday, I declined. There was no way in hell he was ever going to ignore the hair on the back of his neck. (I did that several years before). I didn't give a reason. About 2 weeks later, the recruiter called again, with another offer of about $ 5k more. I declined again. I asked him if he ever met the manager I interviewed with. I explained how the hair on the back of my neck stood up 20 minutes into the interview. How old did I see your eyes 4 times during the interview and they were redder than a stop sign. I explained how he kept rubbing his nose every few seconds. I explained that I suspected they were not allergies and how I worked for alcoholics and abusers in the past. I would not do it again.

About 6 months after the last call, the recruiter called to tell me that the job was back. Same manager. Thanks for calling, but I'm not interested in the environment or travel.

I ended up getting a better job from home about 2 years later, in 2018.

The recruiter called with other possibilities during that time, so I didn't shoot myself in the foot with him. (It didn't help me with the job I have now). About a week before I left that job for the new one, he called to tell me that the manager had been fired and that they were looking for a replacement. I would be interested? The pay was less than the job he left.

I didn't exactly "leave" since it was a phone interview, but I hung up at some point.

I applied for a company because I wanted a full-time job after finishing my bachelor's degree, and they advertised a vacant position. Their job ad said they wanted a full-time hardware designer. Keep it in mind.

After I applied, nothing happened for 3 weeks. Except that the boss and a lady from HR opened a contact request for me on a popular German job portal. I wrote something like “Hello, I hope you have received my application well…”, but none of them responded. Something strange.

Anyway, I r

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I didn't exactly "leave" since it was a phone interview, but I hung up at some point.

I applied for a company because I wanted a full-time job after finishing my bachelor's degree, and they advertised a vacant position. Their job ad said they wanted a full-time hardware designer. Keep it in mind.

After I applied, nothing happened for 3 weeks. Except that the boss and a lady from HR opened a contact request for me on a popular German job portal. I wrote something like “Hello, I hope you have received my application well…”, but none of them responded. Something strange.

Anyway, I got a call from said HR lady. She said she emailed me, but I didn't reply. I apologized and told him that I did not receive anything. It's weird too, since my email is written in my CV, and my CV has the same header for all the jobs I apply to, and everyone else had no problem communicating with me.

However, he invited me for a telephone interview.

The interview was scheduled for 8:00 in the morning. The HR lady called at 8:20. I don't know much about other cultures, but this is considered very bad in Germany.

The HR lady told me a few things about the company. Subsequently, I was asked a few questions about how much experience I have with FPGAs and image processing. I replied.

Then he asked if I plan to do my Master's degree one day. Usually when companies ask this they are looking to know if I only want to work for two years or a few and then I leave them when I have enough money to do my master's degree. I told him that this is not the case.

Her: "But why not?"

Me: “Well, in my actual work experience, I've learned pretty quickly that a degree doesn't really prepare you very well for the industry. I prefer to learn new things by doing them; Also, like everyone else, I like to get paid in full for my work instead of taking on the same job as a full engineer and getting only a quarter of the hourly pay. "

I thought this was a sufficient explanation. But apparently it was not.

Her: “But with your grades, you could get a scholarship somewhere! Money wouldn't be a big deal then, right? "

Me: “Well, it would be enough to get by, yeah. But I've already passed that "enough to get through" phase. As you can see in the letter from my old employer, I am a great engineer, I want a lot of money ”.

Her: "But but but, you could work 20 hours a week for us while you do your Master."

Me: "Come again?"

She: “Yes, we would hire you 20 hours a week and you finished your studies. Wouldn't that be great?

Then there was a bit of silence.

Me: "You mean a part-time job?"

Her: "No, as a student work, of course."

More silence.

Me: “So, in other words. He wants me to change my life plans so that he can have a two-year trial period with me where I only get paid a quarter of a real hardware engineer while doing the work of a real hardware engineer, although I said very clearly that wanted a full time job? "

Her: "Well that's not how I would put it ..."

Me: “But that's what it is, right? I'm going to hang up now, since we're obviously not compatible. I wish you a good day."

Her: “Wait, no! Please, consider it!"

Me: “Thanks, but I'm not interested. Good luck finding someone to fill your position. "

Her: "But -"

Me: * hangs up *

What an absolute waste of time. He didn't bother to type my email address correctly (and no, it's not complicated). He also couldn't call in time. He tried to shoehorn me into a position that I neither applied for nor wanted, and he didn't even respect me enough to accept a "No."

Sorry, but that position wasn't cool enough to support that. If they can't even act as an acceptable employer in the interview, how much effort do they put in to keep their employees happy when they sign the contract? Probably not much. And I'm not here for that.

I was out of work and a facility management company contacted me after viewing my resume on LinkedIn. They were taking over the facility function for a local business and needed a site leader. They couldn't announce it because they hadn't closed the deal, but they wanted someone to participate. I would be interested? Yes, so they arranged an interview at the property.

I arrived and accompanied him to a conference room. The main character was a middle-aged guy with a British accent. His assistant was a brunette with a huge, half-hanging chest. The guy started the interview with some

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I was out of work and a facility management company contacted me after viewing my resume on LinkedIn. They were taking over the facility function for a local business and needed a site leader. They couldn't announce it because they hadn't closed the deal, but they wanted someone to participate. I would be interested? Yes, so they arranged an interview at the property.

I arrived and accompanied him to a conference room. The main character was a middle-aged guy with a British accent. His assistant was a brunette with a huge, half-hanging chest. The intern began the interview with some courtesies, briefly reviewed the opportunity, and then focused on my qualifications. The interview was going well. The brunette never spoke, she only seemed to be taking notes.

He spoke to me as if he already had the job. He described that the company was outsourcing the functions of its facilities and this would be a "soft landing" in the business which meant that we would take on existing staff as employees of our company. So far so good.

Then the tone changed. He described the workforce as overpaid and that they would be upset that they would lose all their seniority and be probationary employees at the new company. They would be granted only one week of vacation, fewer holidays and a lower level of benefits and medical plan.

He told me that as the leader of the site, it would be my job to pressure these people to work harder, and when they refused to write them. The goal would be to fire them all one at a time and replace them with new hires at a much lower hourly rate and lower benefits. He sought my consensus.

I looked at him in disbelief and asked, "Why would I want to do that?" Then I told him that he and his plan were despicable, and that if the main company knew about it, they would not deal with him or his outsourcing company. With that, I got up and left. I had been out of work for some time and my funds were running low so it took a lot for me to get up and walk. But I knew that my morals would not allow me to work for them.

I sent a letter to the company whose site we were on, informing them of my experience. I didn't get a reply so I don't know how it turned out.

Very soon I found a new job in a reputable company.

I requested a private ambulance service. I received an email requesting that you call to schedule an interview. The job started at $ 16 an hour and I specified that I only wanted to work three days a week, which is not uncommon in private emergency medical services.

They agreed after three days and scheduled my interview. So I came to an unmarked building and went inside. They didn't seem like they were expecting me and the office was packed. But I spoke to the owner and a manager, they were the ones conducting the interview, they were both Russian and the manager looked like he was part of the Russian mafia.

Anyway, the me

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I requested a private ambulance service. I received an email requesting that you call to schedule an interview. The job started at $ 16 an hour and I specified that I only wanted to work three days a week, which is not uncommon in private emergency medical services.

They agreed after three days and scheduled my interview. So I came to an unmarked building and went inside. They didn't seem like they were expecting me and the office was packed. But I spoke to the owner and a manager, they were the ones conducting the interview, they were both Russian and the manager looked like he was part of the Russian mafia.

Anyway, the interview is going well, they tried to get me to take $ 15 an hour, but I told them I could only take $ 16. So they agreed, and then they told me that three days a week would be fine, but that my Each day's start and end time will vary and I won't know what time I start and end until the day before my shift, and they will let me know by text message.

That part really didn't sit well with me. So not only is the building unmarked, the offices are overcrowded, they weren't ready for my interview, and now my schedule will not be uniform. At that point, I got up and said it wasn't going to work, shook the owner's hand and the manager's hand and walked out of there. The strange thing was that the manager followed me to the door and saw me get into my car and drive away.

Needless to say, I did not accept the job offer and never applied for a private ambulance job after that. It would have been decent money, but it was too good to be true. And later I found out that Medicare audited them and they owe Medicare a few million dollars and they are likely to close them for fraud.

In fact, I did it a few times. At one point in my career (long before the advent of the web) I was looking for technical management jobs with tech startups. The first recruitment interviews conducted by recruitment companies in lieu of the recruitment company were conducted at that time.

The recruiters saw my combination of business and technical experience and prepared me with interviews that were supposedly for the type of positions I was looking for with companies with generic sounding names that I hadn't heard of (but since I was interested in start-ups , It wasn't like that. Surprise me I didn't recognize them).

It turned out t

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In fact, I did it a few times. At one point in my career (long before the advent of the web) I was looking for technical management jobs with tech startups. The first recruitment interviews conducted by recruitment companies in lieu of the recruitment company were conducted at that time.

The recruiters saw my combination of business and technical experience and prepared me with interviews that were supposedly for the type of positions I was looking for with companies with generic sounding names that I hadn't heard of (but since I was interested in start-ups , It wasn't like that. Surprise me I didn't recognize them).

It turned out that these generic company names were just multiple DBAs for LLCs that own multiple insurance office franchises. DBAs were used specifically for recruitment purposes so that people who were not looking for their positions would attend an in-person selection interview where they could be sold into an open position.

They first did a little research on my computer skills, like if I was comfortable with a keyboard and PC, and if I knew how to use a spreadsheet. Very strange questions for someone who had been a senior software engineer and software administrator for a decade.

But when I went a little deeper into the interview, they would suddenly tell me that I was overqualified for the low technical positions that they had open, but that I would be perfect for running my own insurance office and they wanted to offer to train me for that. and put me in that business.

At the time I said that running an insurance office was not the type of job that interested me, and that more interviews related to that job would waste valuable time for both of us, and I left.

The first time this happened, I thought "what a shame" to use bait and switch tactics.

The second time it happened I decided to "shame" by falling into the trap twice.

After that, he was unwilling to go on recruitment interviews organized by recruiters with companies he couldn't independently vet like tech companies. They still contacted me multiple times, but I never made that mistake a third time.

I have since learned that many companies find it difficult to find candidates looking for sales positions and that they often have to use these techniques to find candidates willing to consider sales positions after a pep talk in an interview.

I came out of some job interviews, I especially remember these three cases:

The dehumanizing language school

They were interviewing me for a position as an English as a Foreign Language teacher at a language school. The academy itself was located in the upper part of the city and the salary was good. This language school, however, had its own teaching system, and if you worked there, you would have to follow those rules.

Everything seemed fine until they came up with “… and of course we always give them quiz-style assignments. No Essays - Who Would Bother Reading 20 Student Essays? Who cares, anyway, what they want to talk about

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I came out of some job interviews, I especially remember these three cases:

The dehumanizing language school

They were interviewing me for a position as an English as a Foreign Language teacher at a language school. The academy itself was located in the upper part of the city and the salary was good. This language school, however, had its own teaching system, and if you worked there, you would have to follow those rules.

Everything seemed fine until they came up with “… and of course we always give them quiz-style assignments. No Essays - Who Would Bother Reading 20 Student Essays? Anyway, who cares what they want to talk about? This was so bad in so many ways - you can't improve your language skills just by checking the correct answer on the test, you won't develop an English narrative if you are never invited to write stories and have them revised, and YES, I actually do care what people want to talk about. I got up and left, saying that I was afraid I would not agree with their "teaching" system.

The elegant company with exploitative salaries

Years later, she was going through interviews as a secretary or assistant in import-export, marketing, and other departments where she had experience. I can't really remember which of those two positions this company had openings at the time. I came to this huge office in a tall building, overlooking the city. Great views, solid but modern furnishings, pretty impressive setup. They made me wait more than half an hour before starting the interview, but they gave me a brochure about the company to review while I was waiting. It also seemed expensive: the quality of the paper itself, the good design ...

When we got to the interview, they were interested in my qualifications and my experience and said that I was going to be selected for the final round of interviews. Salary had never been mentioned, so I asked boldly as they had been giving all kinds of details about themselves and the success of the company. The pay sucked! It was already a low salary for the position itself, even worse considering the aura of luxury they were trying to express. As soon as they said how much they would be paying for this "crucial position in our company" I looked into their eyes one by one as if I couldn't believe what I had just heard, I said "I guess you spent too much on this table and now you can't pay a decent salary, ”she grabbed my bag and left.

The Horrible Jewelry Company You've Always Hated

During roughly the same period, I went through 2 rounds of interviews for a management assistant position in which they had not disclosed which company I was hiring. This happened quite frequently among international companies that hired in Barcelona over a given period, and I really don't know why these companies preferred to reveal their names only in the final rounds. Regardless, the job description was interesting and the pay this time was good. Several other things that I had on my priority list were also fulfilled: occasional flexibility in working hours if needed, few business trips as I am a single mother ... The interview ended with the recruiter happily shaking my hand and saying that I would call a possibly final round of interviews, where the company name would be revealed. She said, with a big smile, "I really can't tell you,

NO!!! I've always hated that company and that silly design! I almost screamed "You don't mean shit, do you?" and she smiled and nodded. I said, “Sorry, I couldn't work for them. Those designs are horrible! ”. And I left.

It's no wonder I'm having trouble making ends meet, but I've been working for 14 years at a research institution, doing the kind of work I love and with people I appreciate. I guess I won.

I left a second interview for the position of night auditor at a hotel.

The first initial interview went well. I was excited about the position and the front office manager seemed nice. I recognized the Star report that tells hotels their hotel sales forecast compared to their competitors and commented on what I learned in my time working and learning about hotel sales. She seemed genuinely interested in what I had to say and told me that she was training to move up in the company. I wished him luck and the interview concluded shortly after.

The second interview was with the GM. I did not get well

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I left a second interview for the position of night auditor at a hotel.

The first initial interview went well. I was excited about the position and the front office manager seemed nice. I recognized the Star report that tells hotels their hotel sales forecast compared to their competitors and commented on what I learned in my time working and learning about hotel sales. She seemed genuinely interested in what I had to say and told me that she was training to move up in the company. I wished him luck and the interview concluded shortly after.

The second interview was with the GM. I didn't get this guy's good vibes as soon as I walked into his office. His questions were direct and not at all about the night auditor position I applied for, but he was looking for sales techniques and wanted me to give him advice on how to increase your occupancy rate.

I, in turn, asked him what this had to do with the night auditor position I applied for. He then threw my application in front of me and highlighted the part where I wrote that he had increased our occupancy by 40% during our slowest period and told me to explain how I did it.

I told him it was not difficult. That as part of my assignment, I came up with a sales strategy and gave my general manager at my last job suggestions on where to find leads that weren't being used, which in turn converted an average of 5 occupied rooms at 65 and even fully booked. On weekends Our hotel only had 86 rooms, so going from 5 rooms on average in the winter to 80% to 100% occupancy was a huge leap. Especially when the weekends were the deadliest days of the week.

He called me a liar. He said that he had never heard of my hotel management company and that my education was a sham. Wow. I told him to google the company. He found the company, then I gave him the address of my last place of work and there you have it. It was still on our hotel website. His face turned red like a fire engine.

I got up and thanked the general manager for his time, but I didn't feel comfortable in the interview anymore and I didn't want the job anymore and I left.

On leaving I saw the manager of the main office. I asked him how his training was going. He said well and then asked how the interview with the general manager was. I said no good and I won't be back. She frowned, apologized and said, "Now you know why I'm leaving." Then I told him to learn as fast as he could and I wished him luck.

I was interviewing for an assistant principal position at a high school. The director was also new. He had been teaching in a public school for about 10 years and had taught at the university level for 11 years prior to that. (So ​​he had quite a bit of experience).

During the interview, I noticed that most of the questions they were asking me had specific answers that were sought. I was looking for the right educational buzzwords (or jargon or terminology). He wasn't really listening to the gist of my answers.

In that moment I realized why, throughout my 21 years of teaching, I had run

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I was interviewing for an assistant principal position at a high school. The director was also new. He had been teaching in a public school for about 10 years and had taught at the university level for 11 years prior to that. (So ​​he had quite a bit of experience).

During the interview, I noticed that most of the questions they were asking me had specific answers that were sought. I was looking for the right educational buzzwords (or jargon or terminology). He wasn't really listening to the gist of my answers.

In that moment I realized why, throughout my 21 years of teaching, I had come across so many ill-equipped school administrators. These people had known how to get the job, how to use the right words during the interview. But they didn't know how to get the job done. They often made poor, illogical, sometimes even selfish decisions that negatively affected students, parents, and teachers. But during their interviews, they seemed flawless.

So I got up, thanked the principal for interviewing me, and told him that I wanted to withdraw my name from consideration for the position. I spent the next nine years as a happy and relaxed high school teacher. I loved my students; He loved his parents; I obeyed the administrators.

I watched the principals and vice principals come and go. I saw them make ridiculous decisions. I saw his missteps covered up by higher ups. I saw them shoot. I saw them forced to retire early. But I kept my mouth shut, my head down, and my opinions to myself.

I have been retired for four years. I have a nice pension plus a small Social Security check. I am comfortable and happy. And I have never regretted leaving that interview.

While I was going to college in Denver, I was approached by a woman who was handing out flyers on campus for a job that paid suspiciously well. I was skeptical so I asked her a bunch of questions and ended up talking to her for a few minutes, before I finally walked away and said no thanks ... but five minutes later another woman with the same steering wheel came up to me. By now I had had enough time to guess myself, so I decided to go into an interview and see what was what.

When I got there, they interviewed everyone in pairs of two, which I had never seen before. You had all these well dressed, pro

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While I was going to college in Denver, I was approached by a woman who was handing out flyers on campus for a job that paid suspiciously well. I was skeptical so I asked her a bunch of questions and ended up talking to her for a few minutes, before I finally walked away and said no thanks ... but five minutes later another woman with the same steering wheel came up to me. By now I had had enough time to guess myself, so I decided to go into an interview and see what was what.

When I got there, they interviewed everyone in pairs of two, which I had never seen before. You had all these well-dressed, professional-looking people who kept pairing up with jerks like me, and that didn't escape my attention. During the interview, the girl I was paired with was amazing for work, she sounded like she practiced what she planned to say hundreds of times and ... she sounded familiar.

They praised the girl for being such an amazing candidate and hired her before dismissing her from the interview to speak with me alone. They then proceeded to criticize everything about me, belittle me, and tell me that I was a very poor candidate and that I really needed to get going if I wanted to work for a company of this caliber ... before finally telling me that they thought I could change and learn to be Better if I tried hard, and they were going to hire me and they were going to give me a chance because they really wanted to increase their reach in Denver and I was lucky for the opportunity.

I was sent to another waiting room to await guidance which, in another strange twist… was right after the interview. So many red flags, by now. I started thinking about the conversation I had with the woman I spoke to last week and, BOOM ... I knew where I had seen my interview partner. She was the woman who wanted to give me a flyer on the first pass, before I turned it down and took it from the second.

I Googled the company on my phone, and they were an MLM company that had been accused of all sorts of screwed up things, like messing with employees' heads to make them feel like they weren't good enough for the job they had, and they were criticized for recruiting children off campus where they might not know any better. My jaw literally dropped as I read my phone.

I walked down the hall, passed the office, and I just said, "bye, I'm leaving" and went home.

Follow your instincts when you see something that sounds too good to be true ...

This was shortly after college for me and I was applying to everything and everywhere.

The first one I didn't even introduce myself to. It was for a customer service position in Arizona. I sent the interview and the workplace to my boyfriend who lives in Arizona and he looked them up and said that it was very superficial and that this place has no record of anything (I really should have done my research). and nothing was said or heard again.

I came out of the second interview because the interviewer only asked all these questions that were illegal. how old are you? You have a car?

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This was shortly after college for me and I was applying to everything and everywhere.

The first one I didn't even introduce myself to. It was for a customer service position in Arizona. I sent the interview and the workplace to my boyfriend who lives in Arizona and he looked them up and said that it was very superficial and that this place has no record of anything (I really should have done my research). and nothing was said or heard again.

I came out of the second interview because the interviewer only asked all these questions that were illegal. how old are you? You have a car? Can you work late? The guy was harassing me and he didn't give me time to respond. After that, He told me to “wait outside and be ready for the second interview IF I was chosen”, wait… what ?!

When I left the interview room, there were at least more than 10 people waiting in the waiting room than when I entered. A lady who had gone before me was in the waiting room and we exchanged glances and we both thought the same "This is very suspicious", so she told the "receptionist" that she had to go and put her bike away and she never came. back. I did the same. I told the receptionist that I would go out to make a call and never came back. He got in the car and headed home. Other reasons why I left? The building we interviewed in did not even belong to the interviewer and was actually rented by them. There was nothing to indicate that they were the actual company we applied for. I may have lost a job perspective by following my instincts,

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