Is there any legal action in Singapore against someone who accepts the job offer and then rejects it or does not join?

Updated on : December 8, 2021 by Jenson Williamson



Is there any legal action in Singapore against someone who accepts the job offer and then rejects it or does not join?

By right, the company can sue you for breach of contract. In reality, it is rarely applied. The time, money, and bad publicity involved just isn't worth it. Unless you are in a senior management position, probably at the CEO or CFO level, and have somehow received confidential information about the company on the premise that you are joining. Ultimately, the company will only initiate a legal action if the breach of the employment contract causes material or intangible damage essential to the company.

Legal action is always possible, but the case is not guaranteed to proceed in court and could be dismissed instead.

In general, there is no legal case, since in Singapore an employment relationship only begins when the employee shows up for work on the first day as indicated in the job offer.

However, exceptional cases (although I have not personally heard of any cases) can be heard if there are very interesting arguments.

It depends, you need a few things, because the government is efficient in saving money, but if you say yes to this little checklist, go ahead, otherwise forget about it:

A) Time (unlimited is best)
B) Money (I paid 20 SGD for a small claim this week), if applicable, check the maximum you can get and ask for it, for example you can claim time for your research on Quora and others websites.
C) Evidence, you need something on paper, it must not be more than 12 months ago.
D) Good luck, of course.

Good luck!

Ps: More details on the Statecourts.gov website.SG if you are a tourist, the 24 hour rule as under

Keep reading

It depends, you need a few things, because the government is efficient in saving money, but if you say yes to this little checklist, go ahead, otherwise forget about it:

A) Time (unlimited is best)
B) Money (I paid 20 SGD for a small claim this week), if applicable, check the maximum you can get and ask for it, for example you can claim time for your research on Quora and others websites.
C) Evidence, you need something on paper, it must not be more than 12 months ago.
D) Good luck, of course.

Good luck!

Ps: More details on the Statecourts.gov.SG website if you are a tourist, the 24 hour rule as I understand it is for goods only, not for services, property damage or housing contracts.

No. If no signing bonus was received, nothing is possible. Singapore law, like UK law, defines an employee only as one who has received some financial remuneration from the employer or who has physically joined the employer even for a single day.

The first thing to know is that there is English law and Scottish law, there used to be the EU, but that is not really a thing now. London has the same labor laws as England and Wales.

Acceptance of an offer occurs when you:

You or your agent agree in writing or verbally

You act as if you have accepted the offer, for example by going to work. A terrifying number of Britons believe the exact opposite of this and some of them have lost money as a result.

You will no doubt find references to Faxes, as they were important to contracts until recently, but not now.

I mention agent here

Keep reading

The first thing to know is that there is English law and Scottish law, there used to be the EU, but that is not really a thing now. London has the same labor laws as England and Wales.

Acceptance of an offer occurs when you:

You or your agent agree in writing or verbally

You act as if you have accepted the offer, for example by going to work. A terrifying number of Britons believe the exact opposite of this and some of them have lost money as a result.

You will no doubt find references to Faxes, as they were important to contracts until recently, but not now.

I mention agent here and many recruiters refer to themselves as agents, which is sometimes true, but they are agents of the employer, not yours. However, of course, verbal offer and acceptance suffer from the problem of proof if it becomes controversial, it never hurts to drop an email saying "thanks for the offer, so we understand the same" and including the important terms. .

That said, the vast majority of employment contracts include some trial period in which either party can terminate without notice. Also keep in mind that in English and Scottish laws you don't get much protection when you start out, unless they get racist, sexist, or whatever.

There is now a racing tips space on Quora, you might find it interesting.

Pro Tips Ed Han, James Eaton, Francesco De Luca and 350 others are contributors

Depends on the situation.

There are people who will tell you that it is unethical.
There are people who will tell you to do what is best for you.

The truth lies somewhere in between.

Look, the basic facts of life are these.

We live and work in a capitalist society.
Workers are commodities, particularly in STEM roles, but now pretty much everywhere.
Accepting a role and withdrawing after accepting is totally acceptable. It's all how you approach the discussion.

If, after considering the role, you decide that you have changed your mind, it is best to make that decision now during acceptance.

Keep reading

Depends on the situation.

There are people who will tell you that it is unethical.
There are people who will tell you to do what is best for you.

The truth lies somewhere in between.

Look, the basic facts of life are these.

We live and work in a capitalist society.
Workers are commodities, particularly in STEM roles, but now pretty much everywhere.
Accepting a role and withdrawing after accepting is totally acceptable. It's all how you approach the discussion.

If, after considering the position, you decide that you have changed your mind, it is better to make that decision now during the acceptance phase than after you have left your current job and started your new one.

Most of us are very busy. We don't usually take the time to consider what it really means to take the job. Often times, this understanding does not occur until you are about to give your notice at your current job, or prepare to be mentally and physically ready to begin a new role.

If you are in ANY doubt as to whether this is the correct position, the answer should be NO. Never enter a new role with reservations or feeling that you need to continue in the new role JUST because you have accepted it. That's not a good sign. You should NEVER commit to something as important as blame-based or "compensation" employment.

There are many legitimate reasons to retire after accepting a new position.

  1. New to the area and unfamiliar with the location and the company.
  2. Excessive travel commitments, including "super commute" (3-4 hours a day).
  3. Contract roles vs. permanent. Nobody really wants to be a contingent member of staff.
  4. Inadequate benefits.
  5. Limited time off or no pay.
  6. Joining a 'project' vs. joining a team and / or a company.
  7. Great pressure from recruiters and account executives working on commission. If they don't close a sale by hiring you, they don't make money.
  8. Limited / no opportunity to advance.
  9. Money (and this is usually at the top of the list, but not the most important consideration after a certain level).
  10. Ability to be in control of your own destiny.
  11. Responsibility to the family for the presence, stability and enough energy to be available and not be brain dead from work or the stress of travel.
  12. The ability to live a life outside of work.

I recently accepted an offer and canceled my acceptance. An outside recruiter put a LOT of pressure on me to make a decision before finishing the interviews and final offers. I was asked to make a decision before I could properly evaluate the opportunities. This is, of course, exactly what they were hoping for with an aggressive push to 'close' my candidacy.

So I made a bad initial decision when accepting the offer. After several offers came in, I had to evaluate them against each other on their own merits. I realized that I had made a big mistake with my engagement. I withdrew my application after 2 days of acceptance. At the same time, the company I agreed to work for made an aggressive effort to get me started the same week, even after I told them I already had a job that I hadn't announced yet. This was a red flag and my radar was active and it made me see this situation from a different perspective. In hindsight, it is clear that this was a tactic for me to start immediately so that there were no other offers up for grabs. Pushy sales tactics often produce highly unpredictable results.

As I sat down to prepare to give notice to my current employer, and to begin to be mentally and logistically ready to take on the new role, I realized that I would be signing up for a 4+ hour commute every day. He was new to the area and didn't understand the time commitment involved in commuting to and from work.

In hindsight, both the recruiter and the account executives knew what I was committing to in terms of travel. They also knew that this was not a viable work trip. No one in their right mind would sign up for that unless they had no other alternatives. They pushed to 'close' the sale because that is the business they are in.

I realized that there was no possible way I could endure that kind of trip. The next morning, I sent an email and explained that I could not accept the position and that I would be retiring.

The setback of the account executive was initially very strong. When I agreed to speak to her on the phone, things calmed down. I explained to him that an aggressive "closure" of my candidacy really was a disservice to all interested parties. If he took on the role, he would end up quitting shortly after. No one could handle that kind of commute. It was a Lose / Lose situation. I would lose my current job, I would lose my new job, and I would be unemployed. The client employer would lose the resource they desperately wanted, and the recruiter and account executive would lose the revenue. In all likelihood I would end up burning several bridges, including my own, in the process.

We agreed to let the acceptance fail. They weren't happy, but it's my choice.

Sometimes there are circumstances beyond the control of the candidate that result in the rejection of an accepted offer.

Pushy sales and closing tactics from AE's and recruiters can produce highly unpredictable results. For them, they just want to put an approved body in a chair so they can collect commissions and waste.

Good recruiters, account executives, and hiring managers know that it's not just about the sale. They will give you the time you need to make the best decision for your own needs and circumstances. If you don't accept the offer, they usually agree to that too. People come and go from companies every day. It is a great risk to force someone to take on a role that they are not comfortable with, for whatever reason. Good managers know that a single bad hire can ruin a team.

It is up to each person to assess their own needs and tolerance for risk. Rejecting an acceptance is totally fine. It is your life, your family, your money that depends on this decision. Honor has nothing to do with it. You cannot eat cheap nobility.

I agree with many other posters that it is never too late not to accept a job offer. But do it sooner rather than later. And if you do have to back down, do it honestly and directly with the recruiter or representative you're working with so it doesn't look like job abandonment. There is also the consideration of the line where refusing a job quickly turns into a job resignation if you have already started orientation or training.

Each situation is a little different, with the proper etiquette and professionalism that differ in each circumstance.

What if you start diligent work?

Keep reading

I agree with many other posters that it is never too late not to accept a job offer. But do it sooner rather than later. And if you do have to back down, do it honestly and directly with the recruiter or representative you're working with so it doesn't look like job abandonment. There is also the consideration of the line where refusing a job quickly turns into a job resignation if you have already started orientation or training.

Each situation is a little different, with the proper etiquette and professionalism that differ in each circumstance.

What if you start a job diligently and find that it is full of lies or bad things? That might be the only instance where it's okay to not show up and quit work. Just from my humble personal experience:

Daniel Marie's response to After going through the interview process, what happened to make you turn down a job offer?

Most of the time it looks like you can back out of a job offer, but do it honestly with the employer or recruiter, as the posters (myself included) from this question suggest:

If you are offered a much better job right after accepting another, what is the proper etiquette to tell you the first job you have reconsidered?

I remember that in addition to the times I was the one who “quit” the job without further ado, which unfortunately was a few more times than when I politely informed the recruiter that I had found another position, there were other people I worked with who both performed Actions.

At the grocery store where I worked for years, there were people who were hired and went through the rigamarole only to not even show up for orientation or just stop coming after the first few nights. Then there was the smart employee who started mentoring with me, but a week later he had to call right away because a full-time position was offered right away. Which employee do you think would be rehired if they showed need or interest in a future position?

The employer must take into account the time, resources and energy that have been invested from the moment the ad appears online or in the newspaper. There are also other reasons why you should be honest and straightforward.

Six Reasons You Should Never Quit Without Warning

This article is a few years old and is not about rejecting the offer, but about resignations. However, you still have some points related to the question if you simply say no to an employer or have severe ties instead of being honest. The way you explain to the employer can be marked as abrupt termination or abandonment if you don't give the reason and how you get the message across.

We must also remember the reverse case. An employer may stop hiring you or change their mind for any reason after you start. Perhaps there is some background item that was not completed in time for your start date and that put the whole deal in jeopardy. Maybe you won't make the cut in training, or maybe your demand for workers will decrease. The golden rule applies strongly here, although the world of employment is often not a moral or fair place. If you were suddenly rejected for a job that you had been offered and accepted, you would have to understand that these things happen as part of life. But at least you would have the right to know what happened and why. And if the explanation were given in an honest and respectful way, you would still feel that on some level your job search efforts have not been wasted.

Even though I'm from the US, I can't imagine they can enforce this in Germany. I think slavery is forbidden in Germany ... They closed those OTHER places too, can someone correct me if I'm wrong ;-)

So let's say they intimidate you into coming to work for them. What are they going to do if you just sit there and do nothing? Do you refuse to do ANY work? Or what if they intimidate you into coming to sign the employment contract? What if you refuse to sign?

Ignore them, block them. First of all, nothing is in writing. My gut tells me that this is an inexperienced manager who is a bully. Just other reasons

Keep reading

Even though I'm from the US, I can't imagine they can enforce this in Germany. I think slavery is forbidden in Germany ... They closed those OTHER places too, can someone correct me if I'm wrong ;-)

So let's say they intimidate you into coming to work for them. What are they going to do if you just sit there and do nothing? Do you refuse to do ANY work? Or what if they intimidate you into coming to sign the employment contract? What if you refuse to sign?

Ignore them, block them. First of all, nothing is in writing. My gut tells me that this is an inexperienced manager who is a bully. Yet another reason why it was good that you got a different job.

WAR HISTORY

I was a hiring manager for a Fortune 500 company. We hired a subcontractor. I thought he would be a good fit, and we could get him into some good positions and then after 6 months bring him into my company as a full time employee.

Well…..

Two days after your employment while we were going through the process of getting your computer access and administrative credentials for classified systems (1-2 week process), we are training you on things as there is a long process of incorporation . Actually, a LOT of work was also done during your acceptance time and getting it to the door, with visitor passes, authorization verification, contract work, approval by the military for us to take it….

Well, on the morning of day 2 (or 3) you send us an email, telling us that you received another offer with a higher salary, asking if we can at least match it. Since he was a substitute, I'm not the money man anyway, so I gave him up to the company that had his job. They said no, and then he said to consider this as my two week notice.

Since then, I am not going to spend my contract money on someone who leaves and still needs to be trained (and this would be classified private training information), and he has NO admin credentials, so he has ZERO productivity, at 30 minutes I told him he took his personal items, and then walked him to the door, took his key cards to the building and the base. I shook his hand and wished him well.

I informed the subcontracting company, that I will not allow them to bill me for your two days of work and they are responsible if they decide to pay you for your notice period.

I couldn't force him to stay with us, but I certainly won't let anyone waste my time and money.

In short, there was NOTHING I could do. I certainly wouldn't intimidate anyone into staying. And neither could I sue him. F it .. Live and learn ...

Question asked: I had a job offer in Germany but did not sign the contract. Meanwhile, I accepted another job offer. The first company says it will take legal action in this regard. What could happen in this case?

Hello, I hope this answer is not too late.

A job offer is like most other offers: buy my limited edition hello kitty doll for 1 million Singapore dollars, for example, once accepted, there is a binding employment contract between the company and the employer.

While the answer to your question depends on the exact terms of your contract and the full factual background, I am assuming that:
(1) there are no conditions precedent stipulated in the offer letter (for example, the offer is conditional on your obtaining a EP, or pass a medical exam, or take certain actions, etc.),
(2) that you

Keep reading

Hello, I hope this answer is not too late.

A job offer is like most other offers: buy my limited edition hello kitty doll for 1 million Singapore dollars, for example, once accepted, there is a binding employment contract between the company and the employer.

While the answer to your question depends on the exact terms of your contract and the full factual background, I am assuming that:
(1) there are no conditions precedent stipulated in the offer letter (for example, the offer is conditional on your obtaining a EP, or pass a medical examination, or take certain actions, etc.),
(2) that he actually accepted the offer (by signing the letter and returning it to the company),
(3) there was no express right for the company to retract of the offer once accepted (which would be unusual),
(4) under the terms of the contract, to terminate your employment, the company had to give you a notice or payment in lieu of the notice, and
(5) you have not committed a breach of contract even before starting work.

If so, and if there are no other key and relevant factors, the company will breach the contract and will therefore be liable to you for damages suffered by you.

I note that you have said that your employment was at will, and I have interpreted that to mean that the employer can terminate your employment at any time (that is, you do not need to show cause), but even if this is the case, if your contract requires the business to give prior written notice, or make a payment in lieu of the notice, then that's what the business should have done. At will does not mean that a company can terminate a job at any time and not have to comply with the terms of the contract. Therefore, you should carefully examine the terms of the contract.

In terms of the damages you are likely to claim in court, Singapore courts appear to be inclined to order a company that has unfairly dismissed an employee, to pay the employee the money that it would have had to pay the employee under of the employment contract had legally terminated employment (that is, by paying the employee the stipulated amount in lieu of notice, or an equivalent salary for the period of notice that he was required to give to terminate employment).

However, because most employers in a situation like this may prefer to resolve your claim (especially if it was a well-advised one), there may be strategic factors that you can rely on in trying to seek a higher amount from the company. to resolve. your complaint. Clearly, the more well funded and strategically supported the company is, and the more badly you can afford negative publicity, the better it will be for you. I agree with what Andrew says, that the costs of you taking action must be justified by the amount of the claim, so you can try to contain your costs by having your lawyer limit his fees or have him settle.

You have 6 years from the date the breach of contract occurred to take legal action, so I hope it is not too late. Of course, the foregoing is merely my personal opinion and is not legal advice nor is it intended for your reliance beyond general information, nor is there an attorney-client relationship between us, and I strongly recommend that you obtain legal advice.

The first is the first; The company whose offer you are rejecting is going to be very pissed off. So be prepared for a not so pleasant conversation / interaction.

Do the following:

Call immediately: Without wasting time, call your company's HR representative immediately and inform them of the decision. Time is of the essence here for the company whose offer you are rejecting. The longer it takes, the more difficulties the company will have.

Reason: Be as open and honest as possible about why you declined the offer, as you have done in the details accompanying the question. you

Keep reading

The first is the first; The company whose offer you are rejecting is going to be very pissed off. So be prepared for a not so pleasant conversation / interaction.

Do the following:

Call immediately: Without wasting time, call your company's HR representative immediately and inform them of the decision. Time is of the essence here for the company whose offer you are rejecting. The longer it takes, the more difficulties the company will have.

Reason: Be as open and honest as possible about why you declined the offer, as you have done in the details accompanying the question. You do not need to reveal the name of the company you decided to join, however, be honest and upfront about why. Honesty is always appreciated.

Excuse me: The HR representative you will be speaking to will be dejected, frustrated, and possibly even furious when you announce your decision. Apologize for having to decline the offer. Please understand that you are putting the company in a lot of trouble by declining the offer. Empathize with the person on the other side and tell them it was not an easy decision and offer a sincere and genuine apology.

Email: Write an email to everyone who participated in the recruitment process explaining your decision with the utmost frankness and honesty, just as you did during the call.

Acknowledgment: Thank the company and your management for the opportunity provided and for considering your candidacy for the position. Connect on professional networks like LinkedIn with the people you have interacted with during the hiring process.

I hope this helps.

The job offer is a job offer provided by any organization at the same time and you must choose between them. Also, when you sign a job offer and accept it, it is an agreement between two parties, you and your employer, that the status of your appointment will be as per the offer letter. The job offer is not something that forces you to do that. It is an offer that you can accept or reject at any time. The same goes for your recruiter, they can also withdraw it at any time, even if you have signed it. The main part of a job offer is a date. Once and

Keep reading

The job offer is a job offer provided by any organization at the same time and you must choose between them. Also, when you sign a job offer and accept it, it is an agreement between two parties, you and your employer, that the status of your appointment will be as per the offer letter. The job offer is not something that forces you to do that. It is an offer that you can accept or reject at any time. The same goes for your recruiter, they can also withdraw it at any time, even if you have signed it. The main part of a job offer is a date. Once you have been designated for any job, all the policies and rules of a company will apply to you. There are some companies that are giving letters of appointment and others that are not. It depends on your policies. Once you have been designated as whatever designation you have earned, you will be subject to their policies. Even after joining the company, if you feel that this is not the right position for you or if you got stuck in the wrong job, you can quit at any time by notifying your employer for a specified period. It can be from 30 days to 90 days depending on your policies. They also have the same rights. All these things that I have written are part of your job offer letter that is clearly mentioned somewhere. Also, I would prefer to convey to you that you always read each employer's offer and select wisely. Don't be too quick to sign each and every offer letter. After signing if you are not joining, this generates a negative impact for a recruiter, but it will not disqualify you for the future for this reason. They have a better understanding of you in any situation like this, but don't hide in your place, let HR staff know about the situation you are facing. Respond professionally about the career you are choosing to pursue, which will give you a positive impact. Sometimes they may offer a better offer than that so you can't decline it. Settling for any job offer is great but never be unprofessional, communication is the key to solving these types of situations and it is not you who is facing this, even this is happening all over the world. Communicate properly before leaving any offer. Everyone wants to grow up and there is nothing wrong with it. Respond professionally about the career you are choosing to pursue, which will give you a positive impact. Sometimes they may offer a better offer than that so you can't decline it. Settling for any job offer is great but never be unprofessional, communication is the key to solving these types of situations and it is not you who is facing this, even this is happening all over the world. Communicate properly before leaving any offer. Everyone wants to grow up and there is nothing wrong with it. Respond professionally about the career you are choosing to pursue, which will give you a positive impact. Sometimes they may offer a better offer than that so you can't decline it. Settling for any job offer is great but never be unprofessional, communication is the key to solving these types of situations and it is not you who faces this, even this is happening all over the world. Communicate properly before leaving any offer. Everyone wants to grow up and there is nothing wrong with it. even this is happening all over the world. Communicate properly before leaving any offer. Everyone wants to grow up and there is nothing wrong with it. even this is happening all over the world. Communicate properly before leaving any offer. Everyone wants to grow up and there is nothing wrong with it. Communicate properly before leaving any offer. Everyone wants to grow up and there is nothing wrong with it. Communicate properly before leaving any offer. Everyone wants to grow up and there is nothing wrong with it.

I previously answered a similar question, so you posted the same answer.

To answer this question, let's first understand the full scenario in which this situation arises.

A candidate who is interviewing with one company may be interviewing many other companies at the same time and may also be working in some company. Now, an employer posts a job offer only after all rounds of interviews are over and after the discussion about commercials with the candidate is over.

A job offer is supposed to be accepted only after a candidate has performed the following checks: -
1. The candidate is willing

Keep reading

I previously answered a similar question, so you posted the same answer.

To answer this question, let's first understand the full scenario in which this situation arises.

A candidate who is interviewing with one company may be interviewing many other companies at the same time and may also be working in some company. Now, an employer posts a job offer only after all rounds of interviews are over and after the discussion about commercials with the candidate is over.

A job offer is supposed to be accepted only after a candidate has performed the following verifications: -
1. The candidate is willing to switch to a new job
2. The candidate complies with the terms and conditions of employment as mentioned in the offer letter
3. The candidate is fine with the salary compensation provided by the new employer.

Now, assuming the above-mentioned checks are made by the candidate and he / she accepts the job offer given by the employer. The following actions / changes occur with the employer after a candidate accepts a job offer: -
1. The employer rejects all subsequent priority candidates
2. All other candidates after being rejected can go to other companies and be hired there
3. Employer could assign you a project taking into account and committing to their clients

One can easily understand the plight of multiple stakeholders involved when turning down a job offer after accepting it. Therefore, it is unprofessional to decline a job offer after accepting it once, and the severity of this behavior is proportional to the number of days it takes to decline. The sooner a candidate informs the employer, the better because the employer can plan their actions in advance.
The best way is to communicate by email as soon as possible.

Many companies use our HireSure platform as a communication platform for candidates to communicate and act professionally while accepting job offers.
Candidates can now decline a job offer that they have previously accepted so that employers are well informed in time.

PS: Job offers should be accepted only after the candidate has made an absolute decision and once accepted, the commitment should be fulfilled as far as possible. On rare occasions of unforeseen situations, job offers may be rejected, but the same should be communicated to the employer as soon as possible.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.