Is there a way to find a job in Europe without a degree?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Adrian Lancaster



Is there a way to find a job in Europe without a degree?

NO

I can only speak for France with certainty, but I think it applies to most of the EU.

It is almost impossible to get a job without a certificate or a dome certificate. If you are a legal resident and you are unemployed, you would be entitled to some type of training to obtain a minimum level of qualification and, in the end, you will receive at least some type of completion certificate. Even if it is a basic training that taught you the safety and health regulations applicable to the food industry. It is not mandatory to get a job flipping hamburgers but between two candidates the one who has

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NO

I can only speak for France with certainty, but I think it applies to most of the EU.

It is almost impossible to get a job without a certificate or a dome certificate. If you are a legal resident and you are unemployed, you would be entitled to some type of training to obtain a minimum level of qualification and, in the end, you will receive at least some type of completion certificate. Even if it is a basic training that taught you the safety and health regulations applicable to the food industry. It is not mandatory to get a job flipping hamburgers but between two candidates the one who has gone through training without leaving space for the others will be preferred.

Also, keep in mind that even if you have received degrees abroad, there is no guarantee that they will be recognized.

Like all my answers I have to say, it depends!

What kind of job?

At what point are you in your career?

What experience do you have?

Are you a resident of the EU?

If you can provide a list, more information, I can answer more fully

A non-EU citizen can only legally live and work in the EU if it is a role that the employer in question cannot find an experienced and qualified EU citizen to perform.

Otherwise it's really impossible with a capital 'I'.

This means that you need to look for something very advanced, specialized, and niche in nature, such as a scientist, CEO, nuclear chemist, professor, computer programmer, physician, or consulting surgeon.

They then sponsor you to get the EU blue card, which is also temporary and not permanent, nor does it automatically lead to EU citizenship. Must be registered and licensed.

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A non-EU citizen can only legally live and work in the EU if it is a role that the employer in question cannot find an experienced and qualified EU citizen to perform.

Otherwise it's really impossible with a capital 'I'.

This means that you need to look for something very advanced, specialized, and niche in nature, such as a scientist, CEO, nuclear chemist, professor, computer programmer, physician, or consulting surgeon.

They then sponsor you to get the EU blue card, which is also temporary and not permanent, nor does it automatically lead to EU citizenship. You must be a registered and licensed employer, and the job must be on a national shortage list of skills occupations that may change as well.

Even then, unless the role requires non-EU languages ​​or non-EU experience, just like the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, the EU is more or less self-sufficient in everything they need. They won't let someone come to work at Starbucks Coffee to set an example.

Remember also that you are not allowed to enter to live and work in Europe simply because you do not like it, you are not satisfied or you have problems finding work at home.

So what are your options if you don't have such a job or home yet or don't fit into those occupational categories?

Money (a minimum of € 1 million for a business investment visa) or marriage (with an EU citizen) are your only ways to enter.

Although we live in a highly globalized and integrated world, national governments still put their own people first for jobs and the international labor market is designed and structured so that people live and work in their own country, continent, operating market regional and commercial block. . Like it or not, that's how things have been arranged. Apart from the EU, freedom of movement only works for goods, capital and services. No people. Even NAFTA and the GCC have certain restrictions.

Therefore, a German working in HR for Coca Cola Deutschland cannot just go and get the same job for Coca Cola USA in Atlanta. However, they can move to Coca Cola France in Paris as it is the whole of the EU.

To qualify for a UK Tier 2 (General) work visa, you must find a UK postgraduate job that pays a minimum wage of £ 30,000 per year, or a minimum wage of £ 55,000 if you are a doctor. Once you have been offered the job, the employer must sponsor you for the level 2 work visa.

There are some exceptions regarding the £ 30,000 minimum wage rule and the rule that you must be a university graduate. The first exception to these rules is jobs classified by the government as "scarcity occupations." Jobs classified as a shortage occupation qualify for a visa even if the room

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To qualify for a UK Tier 2 (General) work visa, you must find a UK postgraduate job that pays a minimum wage of £ 30,000 per year, or a minimum wage of £ 55,000 if you are a doctor. Once you have been offered the job, the employer must sponsor you for the level 2 work visa.

There are some exceptions regarding the £ 30,000 minimum wage rule and the rule that you must be a university graduate. The first exception to these rules is jobs classified by the government as "scarcity occupations." Jobs classified as a shortage occupation qualify for a visa even if the salary is less than £ 30,000 (or £ 55,000 for doctors). But the salary must not be less than 23,000 pounds sterling. There are also some occupations on the shortage occupations list for applicants who do not have a degree.

Shortage graduate occupations on that government list include high school math and physics teachers, nurses, IT managers, engineers, geoscientists, and Ph.D.-qualified scientists. There are also some medical specialties on that shortage list, such as accident and emergency physicians, psychiatrists, and a few other medical specialties (can't remember what they are). Undergraduate occupations on the shortage list include pipe welders, aircraft technicians, cooks / chefs in ethnic restaurants, and power grid linemen. There are also a few other non-graduate occupations on the list.

There is another way to qualify for a Level 2 work visa, even if you don't have a degree. That would be finding a job in the UK, any job regardless of qualifications, paying a salary in excess of £ 155,600 a year. So if you are a footballer, TV host, investment banker, or any other important job you can think of, you can get a Level 2 visa for that job even if you don't have any qualifications. The only well-paying jobs above £ 155,600 that do not qualify under that high wage rule are jobs related to gambling (for example, poker player), the sex industry (for example, prostitution) and illegal jobs (for example , pimp). (High class prostitutes in London charge £ 200 per hour,

If you want to start your own business in the UK, there is a special visa for that. It is the Tier 1 entrepreneur visa. To qualify, you will need £ 200,000 to invest in the business. If you are a young person, you do not need the £ 200,000 if you can convince the immigration caseworker that you have the potential to succeed in business. But they will want to know your track record in the business to back up any claims that you have what it takes to be successful.

There is also a level 1 investment visa. If you can get that visa, there is no requirement to get a job, look for work, start a business or go to school; and you can stop in the UK for as long as you want and come and go as you please. But the problem to qualify for that visa is that you would need to buy £ 2 million worth of UK government bonds (or UK-listed stocks and shares). The £ 2 million is paid back in full after x years.

More details on all the above visas can be found on the government's dot gov website, in the visa section. Welcome to GOV.UK

You could also try looking for work in Ireland. Jobs in Ireland that qualify for an Irish work visa don't have to be graduate work, I heard. But I don't know much else about Ireland. Ireland also has business and investment visas; the capital required to qualify for those visas is not as much as that of the UK. E.g. You need 400 euros for the investment visa for Ireland.

I can tell you what I know about other European countries, but not that much. For German citizens who do not belong to the EEA they must find a postgraduate job that pays a minimum salary of 55,000 euros. That minimum wage is lowered to € 44,000 for occupations on your government's shortage list of occupations. E.g. IT jobs. I don't know much about Luxembourg, but ordinary classrooms in Luxembourg are paid on average 75000 euros per year, which is well above the current rate for school teachers in many other European countries.

That really depends on a lot of things. First of all, you don't get a work permit in Europe, you get a job and then the employer gets you a work permit. Generally speaking, it is quite difficult to enter all countries without the proper background and experience. The UK is probably the hardest to come by as today they even have a quota on how many foreigners can get a work permit.

So to answer your question, your chances depend on:

  • your professional experience: any country where your profession is in high demand will make it easier to get a job
  • known languages: if you speak the local language,
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That really depends on a lot of things. First of all, you don't get a work permit in Europe, you get a job and then the employer gets you a work permit. Generally speaking, it is quite difficult to enter all countries without the proper background and experience. The UK is probably the hardest to come by as today they even have a quota on how many foreigners can get a work permit.

So to answer your question, your chances depend on:

  • your professional experience: any country where your profession is in high demand will make it easier to get a job
  • Known languages: If you already speak the local language, it will be easier to find a transfer job
  • Experience - If you have a lot of work experience, this will make the process of getting a job much easier
  • Presence in the country: If you trained in Europe instead of outside Europe, that will be a great advantage.


The fact is that many Indians get jobs in European companies in India through outsourcing; In reality, the move to Europe for work reasons usually occurs through internal transfer, not through the direct recruitment of a new graduate. If you expect to be taken out of India to Europe, unless you have a skill set that is very specific and in demand, that is highly unlikely to happen. So if your life goal is to move to Europe and work there, you realistically have two tracks:

  1. practice your trade in India and become an expert, and after a couple of years use that experience to move to Europe
  2. do a master's degree in Europe, where it is much easier to get a student permit, and once you graduate, the doors will be much more open for you

Apart from the UK, there is really no country more or less difficult to obtain a permit; if a company needs it, they will take care of it for you. If no company wants you, you will not enter.

If you are not a citizen of the EU or a citizen of Switzerland or Norway, it will be difficult for you to obtain the right to work in Europe.

I have a little knowledge of the process in the UK, I think other countries have similar rules and regulations.

People from outside the EU can apply for UK work / residence visas if a company sponsors them. If you have skills and experience that qualify you for 'hard to fill' job vacancies published by the British government. The skills requested are finance, technology, computers, medicine, engineering, science. They generally require at least a bachelor's degree.

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If you are not a citizen of the EU or a citizen of Switzerland or Norway, it will be difficult for you to obtain the right to work in Europe.

I have a little knowledge of the process in the UK, I think other countries have similar rules and regulations.

People from outside the EU can apply for UK work / residence visas if a company sponsors them. If you have skills and experience that qualify you for 'hard to fill' job vacancies published by the British government. The skills requested are finance, technology, computers, medicine, engineering, science. They generally require at least a bachelor's degree and 3 years of industry experience in the relevant field. The government also specifies a minimum wage range that an employer must offer. If you are lucky enough to qualify for one of these difficult to fill positions, the employer can apply for a work visa on your behalf, one of the criteria would be that they cannot find a local EU citizen who can fill their position,

This process is somewhat slow, it can take anywhere from a few months to the better part of a year for a visa to finally be approved, and there is no guarantee that the sponsored worker will actually show up for work at the end. Therefore, unless you are truly the best in your field, most companies would find this excessively problematic and costly for most positions.

So to answer your question, the best way to land a job in Europe is to have impeccable academic qualifications and many years of experience in leading companies or institutions that make you clearly more qualified than local candidates. Good luck with that.

It depends solely and exclusively on the type of work.

Highly skilled work or specialized academic work is in high demand, not only in IT, but also in science or the medical profession.

Looking for such a job would be relatively easy and, most importantly, it would meet all the conditions for obtaining a work visa. Usually, in such cases, the company would take care of the paperwork and could even provide accommodation, at least temporary.

However, finding any kind of manual or even unskilled work is very difficult, even more so for non-EU citizens.

These job seekers usually finish or

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It depends solely and exclusively on the type of work.

Highly skilled work or specialized academic work is in high demand, not only in IT, but also in science or the medical profession.

Looking for such a job would be relatively easy and, most importantly, it would meet all the conditions for obtaining a work visa. Usually, in such cases, the company would take care of the paperwork and could even provide accommodation, at least temporary.

However, finding any kind of manual or even unskilled work is very difficult, even more so for non-EU citizens.

These job seekers often end up in the slave markets of southern Europe, where they wait for temporary and illegal employment on farms, or they end up in overcrowded cold, moldy neighborhoods in northern Europe, trying to find a day job for a subcontractor of a company. subcontractor on a construction site. Women can also join the sex profession, yet statistics say that more and more men, especially illegal immigrants, are following the same path to nowhere.

There is also a small middle ground for nurses and so on, but these people often come to Europe with the help of agencies in their home countries.

So there is a really stark contrast in job prospects for non-EU citizens within Europe. The highly qualified will be able to earn very good salaries and will seriously enjoy their stay in Europe due to its safety, cleanliness, good infrastructure and excellent quality of life.

The unskilled, however, will suffer tremendously and will be regarded as unwanted human garbage.

I grew up in Italy and worked in Italy, Belgium and for many years in the UK. I feel like in Europe it is a bit more difficult to get a good job without a university degree. Although Britain has moved a lot in the European direction in recent decades, I still think that the mindset here is different (and I say more preferable) in this regard. I know there are many cases in Italy of people reacting to high positions without a university degree, but I think a degree is often required, even for an ordinary sales job, so that you can introduce yourself as Dr. So-and-So. Italians are

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I grew up in Italy and worked in Italy, Belgium and for many years in the UK. I feel like in Europe it is a bit more difficult to get a good job without a university degree. Although Britain has moved a lot in the European direction in recent decades, I still think that the mindset here is different (and I say more preferable) in this regard. I know there are many cases in Italy of people reacting to high positions without a university degree, but I think a degree is often required, even for an ordinary sales job, so that you can introduce yourself as Dr. So-and-So. Italians are impressed by professional titles, although this seems to be changing as there are now too many worthless. As one great Italian writer has observed, “If everyone stands on tiptoe, no one can see anymore ”My English brother-in-law had a good career in Italy as an untitled CPA and I think he was appointed director because of his good business English. His pension there now is much better than mine here.

Best of luck, Europe is generally a great place to live and work.

Roman

What I know is how to do it in Sweden.

There is a lot of information on how to do this the legal way on the internet to make a payment and Google it.

There are practical things that you can't find on Google.

Here come some of them.

The first thing is, what is your profession?

If you are a highly trained professional, it may be quite easy for you, especially if you are a doctor or nurse, or also an IT specialist.

So you suppose you know companies that are looking for people with your skills.

Just find the same and write and call. You may be lucky.

Remember that companies in Sweden are looking for qualified personnel all the time.

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What I know is how to do it in Sweden.

There is a lot of information on how to do this the legal way on the internet to make a payment and Google it.

There are practical things that you can't find on Google.

Here come some of them.

The first thing is, what is your profession?

If you are a highly trained professional, it may be quite easy for you, especially if you are a doctor or nurse, or also an IT specialist.

So you suppose you know companies that are looking for people with your skills.

Just find the same and write and call. You may be lucky.

Remember that in Sweden companies are always looking for trained people who are cheaper and work for less money.

Regardless, if you have some skills, focus on finding companies that need those skills.

What if you don't have any particular skills and don't speak English at all?

Is there nothing to do about it?

There are many people who come to Sweden in this way on an employment contract.

You just have to look for the opportunity sometimes maybe you need to come to Sweden first and ask. They are people who can help you. They will guide you on how to do it.

Just remember that it can be expensive for you.

Money opens all doors.

The question is: is it worth it?

This is not an easy question, it may be, but the price to pay is always high, I do not mean the money.

Absorb what you seek and what you leave behind.

By the way

I heard somewhere that many Chinese are moving to Afrika and arriving there after 5-10 years starting their own business there.

It's not going to happen in Sweden, so keep other options open.

Good luck.

As I understand it, since post-secondary education is being paid for almost entirely by governments, the pressure to go to college is greater and the ability to go longer is more accessible due to lower costs.

From what students told me in the summer of Europe, it seems that a bachelor's degree, which only takes 3 years to obtain, is similar to an associate's degree, hardly more than a diploma from a (community) university or vocational school.

It seems that many North American university degrees are more intense to obtain than European or Australian degrees. For most of the more practical things, a bachelor

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As I understand it, since post-secondary education is being paid for almost entirely by governments, the pressure to go to college is greater and the ability to go longer is more accessible due to lower costs.

From what students told me in the summer of Europe, it seems that a bachelor's degree, which only takes 3 years to obtain, is similar to an associate's degree, hardly more than a diploma from a (community) university or vocational school.

It seems that many North American university degrees are more intense to obtain than European or Australian degrees. For most of the more practical things, a bachelor's degree will be done in Europe, but more academic professions and a master's degree are needed. Like in Canada and the US With a diploma or a bachelor's degree.

It is not Australia or Canada, I assure you. I am Australian.

It also depends on what you understand by work. I found it very easy to get a postdoc in the US And that's probably true for other contract jobs as well. However, the yanks want to rent, not buy, and block you if you have the recklessness to apply for real jobs. Over time, living with a suitcase wears out a lot. Contract jobs are fine while you're young, but what if you want to own a home, get married, and have a family? For that you need a real job.

I work in Southeast Asia. They treat me much better than ever in Austria.

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It is not Australia or Canada, I assure you. I am Australian.

It also depends on what you understand by work. I found it very easy to get a postdoc in the US And that's probably true for other contract jobs as well. However, the yanks want to rent, not buy, and block you if you have the recklessness to apply for real jobs. Over time, living with a suitcase wears out a lot. Contract jobs are fine while you're young, but what if you want to own a home, get married, and have a family? For that you need a real job.

I work in Southeast Asia. I am treated much better than ever in Australia, Great Britain, the United States or Canada. However, very few jobs are advertised in Southeast Asia. You have to show up and ask.

I just turned 65. I got my first real job a month after turning 60. How do you explain that to an 18 year old?

Hungary is the cheapest. You can start a business for only 5,000 euros and after 5 years of life you can get the PR. Another option buys 300,000 euros of Hungarian government bonds, they will give you immediate PR.

Latvia will grant you a residency visa if you have around 80,000 euros for company setup to obtain residency. Another route is to buy real estate for 250,000 euros in Riga, you get permanent residence.

Hungary is the cheapest in Europe and a very good country to live in. Of course, Hungary and Latvia are in Schengen.

Spain and Portugal are very expensive as they require 500,000 euros for residency.

Refer

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Hungary is the cheapest. You can start a business for only 5,000 euros and after 5 years of life you can get the PR. Another option buys 300,000 euros of Hungarian government bonds, they will give you immediate PR.

Latvia will grant you a residency visa if you have around 80,000 euros for company setup to obtain residency. Another route is to buy real estate for 250,000 euros in Riga, you get permanent residence.

Hungary is the cheapest in Europe and a very good country to live in. Of course, Hungary and Latvia are in Schengen.

Spain and Portugal are very expensive as they require 500,000 euros for residency.

References: 1 2 3

Footnotes

1 Immigration in Hungary 2 Residence in the EU for real estate investment 3 Citizenship programs by investment (CIP)

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