Is there a good professional qualification alternative to a coding bootcamp for an experienced but no-practice programmer?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Ivanna Sexton



Is there a good professional qualification alternative to a coding bootcamp for an experienced but no-practice programmer?

Sure, there are two great alternatives to bootcamps when it comes to getting back into the programming field:

Self-learning would be the most "obvious": it is the natural state of learning almost anything without external instruction. Given the vast amount of information that is freely available when it comes to programming, there really is no shortage of things to learn. Even bootcamps draw on this freely available well of knowledge to shape their curriculum.

On-the-job training is the second solution; the best way to learn real world skills is to be in the real world and see what people really need you to do. In fact, the value of recent real-world experience is so powerful that it is often the biggest predictor of passing a future interview and being useful in a new role.

That said, having been self-taught and then proceeding to land a programming role at a tech startup, I finally decided to go the bootcamp route. Despite the freely available material and knowledge of what was necessary, I found that I was constantly lacking the focus to drive through particularly boring parts of development, the context of why certain problems mattered, the foresight to know when I had learned what. enough to be useful. without wasting precious time speculating on a deep topic, accountability to anyone other than myself or the community that would keep me motivated and driven to land a solid job in the industry.

$ 15,000 is a high price to pay for a "seal of competence" from an institution that does not have an academic standing when all that will benefit you is a new exposure to a language you already know and some web applications that I will never see again. And if that's all that stands between you and the job, you would avoid paying that bill. But if the real reason you're not employed as a software developer has more to do with you than some stunted skills ... you may want to consider it with a more critical eye.

Some bad programming practices are inherited from the teacher who taught you to program, while others are innate after sitting in your cubicle for a while.

Here are some 6 bad practices that have caught my attention lately.

Behavioral

1. Always blaming the system administrator

Whenever the application crashes and you ask the programmer "What's going on?", The first thing he is quick to say is "Just restart the server and everything will be fine."

The server is always fine and you don't need to restart Rodger! This makes management think that the system administrator is sleeping at work.

2. Claiming to be addicted to coffee

have you ever

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Some bad programming practices are inherited from the teacher who taught you to program, while others are innate after sitting in your cubicle for a while.

Here are some 6 bad practices that have caught my attention lately.

Behavioral

1. Always blaming the system administrator

Whenever the application crashes and you ask the programmer "What's going on?", The first thing he is quick to say is "Just restart the server and everything will be fine."

The server is always fine and you don't need to restart Rodger! This makes management think that the system administrator is sleeping at work.

2. Claiming to be addicted to coffee

Have you ever heard of a programmer being asked what their day is like? After saying all the shit, you'll get somewhere "Oh, and I'm a coffee addict", even those who don't care about coffee for whatever reason make this claim.

3. Hitting PHP developers at all times

It's pretty naive for programmers to think that everyone should stop what they're doing and start learning Ruby on Rails and Nodejs.

You will hear most programmers painting like crazy in PHP, claiming that it is dead. How can it be dead and power more than 80% of the entire Internet?

You can create a toy blog in Nodejs, but actual blogs run in PHP.

Technical

4. Don't comment on your code

Have you heard of someone saying that good code is its own documentation?

Even if you use very descriptive variables, functions, and class names, please comment your code! Even the code most familiar to you is foreign to another developer. Your comments will save other developers a lot of trouble.

I comment out every function that I write, even if it is a line.

Most programmers are in a race for 1000 lines of code thinking that they will come back and comment on their work once they are done. It does not work like that.

5. Don't use version control

Version control is a necessary evil.

This is what happened to me in the past.

Company X built an automated affiliate payment system using the PAP service API in recent years. The hired developer eventually terminated his contract and was fired from the company.

Then the company needed a feature that would allow removing and adding new affiliates through a user interface - affiliate ids were initially saved to a file as json within code.

They hire a new developer. The new developer receives the entire code base from the previous developer and, not knowing what's going on, tries to fix the code.

In the process, it ruins the original code. The app is not working at all now. Then they fire his ass.

This company hired me to fix the problem.

If this code was version controlled, you could simply have reverted your changes to the latest working version and then started creating new features. But this was not the case.

The code is poorly done, no frame and no comments. Suspecting that the client will also fire me, I fired the client before it was too late.

6. Defining variables that are never used

Many times I have come across well defined classes with all the public, protected, private and static properties and their names.

I take my time going through all the code in the class to find out where the variables are used to find out if I need to modify their values, only to find that the variables were never used anywhere within the class. Seriously?

After reading 2000 lines of code and my eyes bleed?

If you are not going to use variables, you do not need to name them. This is especially common with scripting languages ​​like Ruby, Python, and PHP.

With statically typed languages ​​like Java, you won't get away with compile time.

Happy coding!

Disclaimer: I was never paid or reimbursed for writing this. In fact, I only mentioned the name of the coding boot camp because that was the school I chose to go to. It has been about a year since I attended and looking back, the program taught me some very valuable skills. It's nothing that a Udemy course can't teach better, but I'm the type of person who asks questions to better understand concepts. I paid with my hard earned money and would never want to feel taken advantage of. I tested the instructors several times, to see if they know what they are teaching, and in the end I go

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Disclaimer: I was never paid or reimbursed for writing this. In fact, I only mentioned the name of the coding boot camp because that was the school I chose to go to. It has been about a year since I attended and looking back, the program taught me some very valuable skills. It's nothing that a Udemy course can't teach better, but I'm the type of person who asks questions to better understand concepts. I paid with my hard earned money and would never want to feel taken advantage of. I tested the instructors several times, to see if they knew what they were teaching, and in the end I was lucky with a good bootcamp. Also, looking back, skills weren't the only thing I gained. I think the connections I made had a greater or equal impact on me finding my first job in the industry. This was not

Below is my experience attending a Coding Bootcamp.

Before the Bootcamp

I was attending WakeTech for my web development degree. It was a very pleasant experience and it taught me a lot about programming and conceptual design, but it was not as practical or as fast as I expected. It was then that I started to learn to program myself. I did my research and found that many web developers recommended Colt's Steele web development course on Udemy. I bought that course and completed it in four months. It was very informative and it was one of the best Udemy courses I have ever taken. He taught me HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Bootstrap 3 and 4. After this course, I was looking for ways to become a better web developer and stumbled upon a Reddit post about a beginning developer and his boot camp experience.

About to commit

I did my research again and found that Tech Talent South was one of the highest rated boot camps in my area. I called them and an interview was scheduled. They asked me questions about my coding experience and were testing if I qualified for their course. I passed his interview and agreed to attend his course.

Finally he pulled the plug and attended

I first attended your Code Immersion program (Full-Stack Web Development) and at the time of writing this article you are about to attend another. (Story for another time) This program was very practical and I loved it. It taught me to think like a programmer and to solve coding problems. I'm not implying that it was easy, it was actually one of the hardest things I ever did. A lot of information about Ruby and Ruby on Rails was thrown at me and like a sponge I tried to absorb it all.

Self doubts and struggles

Halfway through the program, I felt like I was falling behind because I was still going to school full time. Determined to fully commit, I purchased two additional courses on Udemy about Ruby and Ruby on Rails. That's how I spent all the weekdays and weekends of my free time. It was my date, my lover and my hobby.

Coming to an end

The bootcamp was exceptionally good. I met many talented people like my instructor Brian and friends who shared my passion for web development. I was pushed around when I was depressed and overall the experience helped me grow as a developer. I'm not saying a coding bootcamp is for everyone. Some people thrive in a very fast-paced environment where you can ask questions and collaborate with other people, others work best by learning on their own. All I'm saying is that my experience with a coding bootcamp provided me with the tools and the network connection to advance my progress as a web developer. I had such a good experience that I decided to attend another. This time focusing on JavaScript development!

I am a web developer specializing in Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, React, PHP, SCSS, PhotoShop among many other programs or web applications. I am always looking for additional work or collaborations. Peter tran

From personal experience, perhaps partial, I can say Le Wagon. I just finished the show in early September, here is my review that I posted elsewhere:

Le Wagon was one of the best experiences I have ever had. I graduated from university in May 2018 with a degree in business administration, but I had already started learning to code myself. I knew that in order to be hired I had to undergo a little more formal training. My research led me to Le Wagon, it had the most reasonable price, the highest rating, and it wasn't too long. I decided on Le Wagon, Montreal as I could speak French and had never been to it.

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From personal experience, perhaps partial, I can say Le Wagon. I just finished the show in early September, here is my review that I posted elsewhere:

Le Wagon was one of the best experiences I have ever had. I graduated from university in May 2018 with a degree in business administration, but I had already started learning to code myself. I knew that in order to be hired I had to undergo a little more formal training. My research led me to Le Wagon, it had the most reasonable price, the highest rating, and it wasn't too long. I decided on Le Wagon, Montreal as I could speak French and had never really been to that part of Canada.

The program itself is very intense. Don't think this will be an easy certification, it is not. In the end you will have suffered countless headaches, lost hope, you have found it again, you have eaten yourself from stress, you have taken a nap from stress, but in the end it is worth it. You get what you invest in, so if you really prepare, pay attention and work on challenges all day and at home, you will be successful and have enough skills to find work later. You can go out and sleep just as easily most days, while the teachers are there to help you achieve your goals, but they are not your parents.

I entered the program with a bit of coding knowledge, but not much, so I struggled the first two weeks to catch up. Teachers are your best weapon, but really try to figure things out on your own, many times your mistake is very small or you have not read the challenge instructions thoroughly (also stay on their good side, you will be abusing them during the week of draft). I never would have thought that in a short time I would be testing a product that I had built, but Le Wagon makes you feel prepared.

What makes this boot camp comparatively worthwhile is the confidence it brings you. I can say from experience that I have been offered jobs only because I am not afraid to seek an answer and teach myself, an invaluable skill that this program imposes on you. Also, the project and the Airbnb clone are not a joke, they are serious things that will set your resume apart from other applicants.

Have at least 3 full stack projects, study some / data structures and apply for ~ 300 jobs minimum. Practice interviews on Pramp and practice Leetcode / HackerRank.

I went to a coding bootcamp and switched my career to tech. Now I am a software developer in Silicon Valley (web development, mainly JavaScript). Was my experience worth it?

The 5 BEST CODING BOOTCAMPS in 2019 are Hack Reactor / Galvanize, General Assembly, Lambda School, Fullstack Academy and Flatiron School

Many focus on web development because it is currently taught at the university, so there is a great demand in the market.

My coding boot

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Have at least 3 full stack projects, study some / data structures and apply for ~ 300 jobs minimum. Practice interviews on Pramp and practice Leetcode / HackerRank.

I went to a coding bootcamp and switched my career to tech. Now I am a software developer in Silicon Valley (web development, mainly JavaScript). Was my experience worth it?

The 5 BEST CODING BOOTCAMPS in 2019 are Hack Reactor / Galvanize, General Assembly, Lambda School, Fullstack Academy and Flatiron School

Many focus on web development because it is currently taught at the university, so there is a great demand in the market.

My coding bootcamp experience really changed my life for the better, BUT was it worth the money? You can definitely go through the same learning process and get your first job without a coding bootcamp (online resources like FreeCodeCamp are great)

I break down in detail some common misconceptions about boot camp scheduling and explain why you should / shouldn't go.

What is a coding bootcamp?

* Accelerated program to learn software skills

* 3 months to a year

* Smaller cohorts

Why are there boot camps?

* Current skills gap in the industry

* Not everyone can afford to go back to college (although a bootcamp is not a substitute)

* Very high ROI

Location?

* Major cities

* Remote

* Occasionally partner with universities

What they don't tell you (marketing lies):

* Bootcamps don't really teach you much, it's very self-taught

* There are not as many open positions as you think

* Stats are fabricated (they employ bootcamp graduates as instructors, heavily filter out people they think they can successfully pull off)

* Job hunting is the hardest part of bootcamp (seriously, people applied for \ ~ 300 jobs)

* Just the beginning, the learning never stops (but that's the fun part!)

* You can make this career transition on your own without a boot camp

What do you think about coding bootcamps? They definitely have stigmata, but high-quality ones can be great resources too!

I also heard the same. Bootcamps aren't really ideal for total beginners. In my opinion, they are a waste of time and money.

Most bootcamps are unreliable. It is difficult to find the gems inside the smoking pile. Whose opinions do you trust? Are you willing to bet your hard-earned money?

Bootcamps cannot guarantee you a job. If they could, they would offer you a money back guarantee. Good luck getting your $ 11,000 back.

After 12 intensive weeks in a bootcamp, upon graduation, all it will take is to have learned the basics of programming. You will NOT be in any way ac

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I also heard the same. Bootcamps aren't really ideal for total beginners. In my opinion, they are a waste of time and money.

Most bootcamps are unreliable. It is difficult to find the gems inside the smoking pile. Whose opinions do you trust? Are you willing to bet your hard-earned money?

Bootcamps cannot guarantee you a job. If they could, they would offer you a money back guarantee. Good luck getting your $ 11,000 back.

After 12 intensive weeks in a bootcamp, upon graduation, all it will take is to have learned the basics of programming. You will NOT be in any way a competent and productive programmer.

Here's the dirty little secret bootcamps don't tell you: It takes thousands of hours of practice to write software to achieve any kind of competition. Do the math. This translates into many months, perhaps years, of full-time programming. Can any bootcamp squeeze all of that into 12 weeks?

I hope you have some common sense, because without it, you won't get very far in the IT industry.

Also, not everyone is ready to learn in boot camp. That's why the admission rate is around 10 percent, or it should be, if the boot camp has any integrity.

If you don't qualify, what should you do? Give up learning to code? Of course, no!

You can always learn to code on your own. There are many free online resources. And best of all, you learn at your own pace, not in a 12-week manic program that costs you $ 11,000.

UPDATE Aug 28, 2017 - Read this article, Why Coding Bootcamps Are Not Working.

Despite recent economic downturns and uncertainties, hiring managers and tech startups are still looking for highly skilled coders. Up to 84% of them agreed that bootcamp graduates are likely to be successful and become as much a part of their "hire" list as their counterparts with college degrees. This makes one thing clear: graduates of coding camps are not less equipped in any sense and have a bright future ahead of them, as long as you sign up for a good one. Much has changed in the bootcamp industry since its launch in 2012 and there are now over 500 worldwide. Does

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Despite recent economic downturns and uncertainties, hiring managers and tech startups are still looking for highly skilled coders. Up to 84% of them agreed that bootcamp graduates are likely to be successful and become as much a part of their "hire" list as their counterparts with college degrees. This makes one thing clear: graduates of coding camps are not less equipped in any sense and have a bright future ahead of them, as long as you sign up for a good one. Much has changed in the bootcamp industry since its launch in 2012 and there are now over 500 worldwide. It makes choosing the right one quite a difficult decision. There are all kinds of coding camps: online, part-time, full-time and in-person, teaching all kinds of on-demand skills such as ruby, python, java, full stack, data science, and software development through project-based learning. The skills you learn through these camps can get you hired right away from top IT companies.

Why are coding camps important?

With many advancements in the digital world, it has become more important to deal with changes and a coding camp is the right way to do it. Businesses face fierce competition and their need to innovate has increased in recent years. A coding camp transforms you seamlessly, preparing you for real-world challenges and meeting changing demands. Bootcamps are fast, intense, and quite rigorous, and the best part is that they focus only on the skills that are most relevant to the real world.

How much can you earn after completing your course?

There is no guaranteed salary, as it also depends on the type of course you have taken, the type of IT clients the bootcamp has, and the demand for your skill in the area. But you can expect to earn between $ 65K- $ 75K and with a good camp, you can go as high as $ 85K- $ 95K. But it's just an optimistic picture as you need to know which camp to sign up for that could bring you a good job, as there are many camps, positions where graduates struggle to get a decent job even after trying for several months.

Before I share my top bootcamp list, I want to give you some suggestions to help you find the right one:

  • Pay attention to your learning style and see if you support it.
  • Find out if you want to do it in person, online, full or part time.
  • If you don't have any prior experience, take a prep course or attend workshops to get ready for the fast-paced life
  • See the type of teachers they have and their lot size and avoid signing up for a place that is too crowded to learn anything
  • Do they cover trending topics and how progressive is their course?
  • What are the placement rate and fee structure?
  • Read some reviews online and talk to the student.
  • Find out if they are transparent about professional results, as you don't want to fall for rosy promises, just results.
  • Their selection criteria speak volumes, as unreliable camps do not have any selection method.
  • Do you have financing options in case the course is too expensive?

Remember that there is no 'one-size-fits-all training ground' as it depends on your own learning style, requirements, career goals, location and availability, etc.

Update (https://anyonecanlearntocode.com/) - is a Chicago-based coding camp that also offers 24-hour online classes. They hire leading instructors in the field to allow students to learn only from the best. Instructors teach live online to help build a real connection between themselves and each student. They have a job hacking curriculum to help you create an impressive resume and assist you in your job search. From 4 to 12 weeks, they have a variety of programs along with pre-work classes, live training, and projects.

SynergisticIT (http://synergisticit.com/) - They are a hybrid of a camp and a consultancy, so expect superior job support with trusted locations. From Java, python, AWS, Mern stack to machine learning, data science, and other on-demand libraries, they have experts covering all of that along with personalized guidance for each student. With comprehensive coverage of each topic along with repeated regular sessions, his teaching approach is quite impressive. On average, your graduates are hired by top IT companies within 6 weeks of course completion, which speaks volumes about their commitment to finding you a job as well.

Claim Academy (https://www.claimacademystl.com/) - Help be an active coder in just 3 months. You can become a trained software engineer in 12 weeks with your courses in Full stack Java, .Net, Front end JavaScript, at Cybersecurity. You can apply online, schedule an interview, complete required prep work, appear for a technical interview, and be selected. They are intense since you need to dedicate 60 hours a week to accelerate learning and meet your goal.

Tech Talent South (https://www.techtalentsouth.com/) - Provide flexible solutions to enhance the skills of all students who want to mark their entry into the coding field. They tailor custom plans based on the candidate's needs and help meet the changing requirements of the industry. They have campuses in more than 12 cities in the US and they also train through online mode. The courses they offer include HTML, CSS, JavaScript and AJAX for a period of 8 weeks.

Wyncode (https://wyncode.co/) - Web development, digital marketing, UX / UI design, all of which are in high demand these days, are taught by them over a 10-12 week period. They have online and in-person camps for full-time and part-time students.

The coding industry is booming and if you want to start your own business or play a major role on a development team for a large IT client, then it's time to learn how to code. It is estimated that there will be 1.4 million more IT jobs by the end of 2021 with 500,000 job openings. Wages are increasing and so is the demand, making it a lucrative field to enter. I hope my suggestions help advance your career in a positive way!

This is a pretty broad question! I'll try to improvise some useful perspectives and links. I'm a co-founder of the largest coding boot camp, Hack Reactor, so I'm obviously a believer, but I'll try to give a balanced answer.

Here are some things you should know:

  • Coding bootcamps have proven to be an effective way for people to start a career in software engineering. You can read reviews from past students (the Course Report has a ton of it) and see that there are many success stories.
  • Not all bootcamps are the same. DO YOUR RESEARCH. There is a WIDE variety of quality in space, and
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This is a pretty broad question! I'll try to improvise some useful perspectives and links. I'm a co-founder of the largest coding boot camp, Hack Reactor, so I'm obviously a believer, but I'll try to give a balanced answer.

Here are some things you should know:

  • Coding bootcamps have proven to be an effective way for people to start a career in software engineering. You can read reviews from past students (the Course Report has a ton of it) and see that there are many success stories.
  • Not all bootcamps are the same. DO YOUR RESEARCH. There is a WIDE variety of quality in space and there is no simple way to get a balanced view of a particular show. There is no substitute for talking to alumni, visiting campus, etc. Hack Reactor and App Academy are frequently listed as the best boot camps.
    • If you're not in a major tech hub, you may feel like your options are limited. DO NOT JOIN A LOCAL BOOTCAMP BECAUSE YOU THINK THERE ARE NO OTHER OPTIONS. You should evaluate the various bootcamps online. Even if you just read that and you think "no, I want a bootcamp in person", TRUST ME.
  • You shouldn't join a bootcamp if you haven't spent more than 100 hours learning to code BEFORE you deposit $ 10k +. The reason: 1) you need to know if you have an interest / aptitude; 2) You need a head start in your studies to be career-ready after the program.
    • If you want to join a bootcamp, but haven't done this initial training yet, join a bootcamp preparation class. Something like the Hack Reactor structured study program. They can be done before you quit your job and they are not that expensive.
  • You should not join a bootcamp that allows you to do so without studying more than 100 hours before being admitted. This is a sign that a school is not researching people properly, which means that 1) the pace of the program will be driven by people who are unprepared, and 2) the school is probably doing a lot of other things wrong if they are doing bad admissions.

I got a Software Engineering job after about a month.

They also offered me a very good salary with a nice bonus.

I had prior programming knowledge like HTML, CSS, JS / jQuery with a family job and I did it for free just for work experience.

After bootcamp again, I found a job pretty quickly and was able to show my past work experience.

They offered me a job for $ 250k / yr with a 20% bonus.

Very good for anyone who works especially for a few years for free. In 8 months I was promoted and now I received a salary of approximately $ 375,000 + 28% bonus and I own approximately 10% of the start-up

I invested in startup w

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I got a Software Engineering job after about a month.

They also offered me a very good salary with a nice bonus.

I had prior programming knowledge like HTML, CSS, JS / jQuery with a family job and I did it for free just for work experience.

After bootcamp again, I found a job pretty quickly and was able to show my past work experience.

They offered me a job for $ 250k / yr with a 20% bonus.

Very good for anyone who works especially for a few years for free. In 8 months I was promoted and now I received a salary of approximately $ 375,000 + 28% bonus and I own approximately 10% of the start-up

I invested in the startup with my Stock Investing that I was doing during bootcamp and working and a year before.

Now my stake is worth tens of millions +, making money doing what I love, I am a good friend of the founder and CEO and I work a minimum of hours as a developer (around 3).

I guess I was lucky with my first job, but I think the years of free work really helped me with my success. I'm still under 30, and most people my age are still graduating from school with more than $ 50,000 in debt.

I was anonymous for obvious reasons.

Any job-guaranteed boot camp will, at best, refund your money if you don't get a job.

I once heard about a training program in New York (Edit - Anmol Kshetrimayum found the link 1! Thanks!) That did not charge anything, but did charge a referral fee on their first placement. Again, however, there is no guarantee. In fact, they didn't accept just anyone.

And any program with a guarantee would have to turn down some candidates. Because not everyone can be a successful programmer. Therefore, any running business, if it wants to remain profitable, cannot offer a guarantee that it can teach someone that it is impossible.

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Footnotes

1 The Recurse Center

Any job-guaranteed boot camp will, at best, refund your money if you don't get a job.

I once heard about a training program in New York (Edit - Anmol Kshetrimayum found the link 1! Thanks!) That did not charge anything, but did charge a referral fee on their first placement. Again, however, there is no guarantee. In fact, they didn't accept just anyone.

And any program with a guarantee would have to turn down some candidates. Because not everyone can be a successful programmer. Therefore, any going business, if it wants to remain profitable, cannot offer a guarantee that it can teach someone who is impossible to teach.

The fact that they accept student money, knowing that some students can't learn, puts most bootcamps firmly in the “scam” category, as far as I'm concerned. They really should offer at least a partial refund if you can't graduate. And they should test you to see if you've learned enough. The last thing the world needs is to have even more incompetent developers apply for every job.

Try FreeCodeCamp. No collateral is needed because, at first, you don't pay it. If you complete the entire program, you will end up with items for your resume. And that's more "real" than any training ground.

Footnotes

1 The Recurse Center

This depends on what you mean by "advanced level". If a computer science major at a high school like MIT is what you would consider an advanced level student, then there are actually some boot camps that actively have these types of students like Fullstack Academy, Hack Reactor, and Make School (to the extent where my limited scope goes).

Taken from another answer, there are also schools that have differentiated themselves by being part of the TechHire Initiative (NESTA)

  • App academy
  • Bootcamp for developers
  • Flatiron School
  • Galvanize
  • General Assembly (company)
  • Hackbright Academy
  • Hack Reactor
  • MakerSquare
  • Turing School of Software and Design
  • Wyn
Keep reading

This depends on what you mean by "advanced level". If a computer science major at a high school like MIT is what you would consider an advanced level student, then there are actually some boot camps that actively have these types of students like Fullstack Academy, Hack Reactor, and Make School (to the extent where my limited scope goes).

Taken from another answer, there are also schools that have differentiated themselves by being part of the TechHire Initiative (NESTA)

  • App academy
  • Bootcamp for developers
  • Flatiron School
  • Galvanize
  • General Assembly (company)
  • Hackbright Academy
  • Hack Reactor
  • MakerSquare
  • Turing School of Software and Design
  • Wyncode

Otras escuelas se han diferenciado al recibir constantemente excelentes críticas de sus estudiantes o al tener muchos ganadores del hackathon.

  • Fundición codificadora
  • Dojo de codificación
  • DevMountain
  • Epicodus
  • Academia Fullstack
  • El patio de hierro
  • Tradecrafted


Some of these bootcamps have a way more lenient admissions process than others. But maybe, based on your perspective, the admissions process is very easy or very difficult. It just depends on the student.


Either way, it is a very large financial and time investment. Choose carefully and have fun! :-)

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