Is the race really that important or are there things that are more important?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Ivan Rios



Is the race really that important or are there things that are more important?

Well obviously, the career is an important part of someone's life, as it is an important resource for everything else that is needed to survive and also to establish a sense of achievement.

It also depends on where you are in your life. At some point in your life it may be, or it should be the most important thing to you and you must do your best to shape your career in the best way.

But it is not the only thing that qualifies as "important" in life because gradually as you progress in your life, you have to incorporate some other things and give them importance. Look you scream

Keep reading

Well obviously, the career is an important part of someone's life, as it is an important resource for everything else that is needed to survive and also to establish a sense of achievement.

It also depends on where you are in your life. At some point in your life it may be, or it should be the most important thing to you and you must do your best to shape your career in the best way.

But it is not the only thing that qualifies as "important" in life because gradually as you progress in your life, you have to incorporate some other things and give them importance. See, you have to understand the importance of prioritizing yourself first (even I realized that later) and then understand your priorities. The list of important things may differ from person to person, some of which are common to all are listed below:

  • Family (people for whom you are important)
  • Health (physical + mental)
  • Hobbies and Passion
  • Bonding with other people
  • Weather
  • Happiness
  • Self-satisfaction
  • Love

Life is a journey, make the most of it!

Assuming you are not faced with a strange situation that puts your career in jeopardy, there is nothing more important than your career.

However, there are some things as important as your career: parents, siblings, spouse / children, in addition to health and hygiene. Why are they as important as your career?

Because, like his career, none of these can be recovered, once lost.

If you are still not convinced, ask poor children who cannot go to school or the person who cannot get a job after graduation about their views.

Also, ask the most successful person you know about this.

You will be in shock

Keep reading

Assuming you are not faced with a strange situation that puts your career in jeopardy, there is nothing more important than your career.

However, there are some things as important as your career: parents, siblings, spouse / children, in addition to health and hygiene. Why are they as important as your career?

Because, like his career, none of these can be recovered, once lost.

If you are still not convinced, ask poor children who cannot go to school or the person who cannot get a job after graduation about their views.

Also, ask the most successful person you know about this.

You will be surprised how much difference a good race can make!

Health!

Having a life, and living it, is generally more important.

But let's not fool ourselves either.

Having a career is really important, but not the most important thing in life. The race is a technical fact of real life. You cannot support yourself and your family efficiently enough without a job, no job, no income.

I will say that to make sure you have an independent life of your own, live your dreams, you will need a career. Having a career is an easy and comfortable way to earn money. Whereas, what matters is money. The question is not whether you have a stable career or not. The question is whether you can generate a decent income for yourself to ensure your survival and independence in the future!

The purpose of life is important. Goals are important. Positive goals and transformation of yourself and other people's lives are important. Loving yourself and living with abundant joy, peace, money, wealth, and prosperity are important. During student life, the acquisition of professional skills along with academic skills is a priority. After student life, money, wealth, and success come first. Once you know how to achieve them through your professional skills or area of ​​interest, you can add value to other people's lives by transforming their lives in the following area: -

  1. Career
  2. Money
  3. Success
  4. Can
  5. Relationship

It depends on the person or where the person is in their life, but I believe that both professional life and life outside of work are equally important for different reasons. Relationships, recreational activities (both romantic and non-romantic), and personal interests can bring happiness, but a job helps you have food, shelter, and clothing (the three basic needs of humanity). So, there is no hierarchy. Every aspect of life has a different purpose

Have a sure way to make money in your life, then you can say goodbye to your career. Until then, keep doing your job.

Having a good career is an important achievement for most people. I think once you understand what it really is, its value becomes apparent.

When I was young, I thought of a "career" as a white-collar office job that started low and then progressively worked its way up step by step, taking on more responsibilities and higher pay, until finally one achieved a significant amount of status. and income at their company, until they retired with a comfortable retirement package in their sixties. This is probably what it meant to many, many people in the 20th century.

However, this conce

Keep reading

Having a good career is an important achievement for most people. I think once you understand what it really is, its value becomes apparent.

When I was young, I thought of a "career" as a white-collar office job that started low and then progressively worked its way up step by step, taking on more responsibilities and higher pay, until finally one achieved a significant amount of status. and income at their company, until they retired with a comfortable retirement package in their sixties. This is probably what it meant to many, many people in the 20th century.

However, this concept has changed for me. These days, staying with a company for your entire working life seems like a foreign concept to most people (though not everyone; there are people I work with in my current job who have been with the company for decades and don't have no compelling reason to want to.For me, that says a lot about employee retention and satisfaction). I don't know if or when I'll be leaving here, but right now I have no plans to do so because my salary is good, the work is satisfying, and my coworkers are amazing. But this job is not my career.

My career is an aspect of my life. I can honestly say that I have been very lucky. I realized early on (in college) that I was good at graphic design and working with Macintosh computers. Not only was I good at it, but I really enjoyed doing it. As I thought of different career options, I realized that being a designer was perfect. He could work with Macs, he could be creative and produce cool things with cool toys, he was not beholden to the 9-5 work schedule, and best of all, it was a job that would never go out of date. As opposed to learning a specific method of doing something, such as learning a programming language or mastering the operation of a certain piece of machinery.

My career is the sum total of my activities in the field of visual communication. All the people I have worked for, all the projects I have successfully produced, all the awards I have won are included in the "my career" rubric. Many people have careers that far exceed mine relatively modest. Some people who started where I started have created ad campaigns around the world, branding for global corporations, multi-million dollar Superbowl TV spots, and even made TV and movies (Michael Bay started in advertising). But I have no such aspirations. My professional goal is quite simple: to make the world a better place with my creative talents.

Right now I work for a company that I am proud of, I do a job that I am proud of, I have a good stable salary, I work with great people who I enjoy being with every day. That's my job. But my career also includes starting two design businesses, both of which are still operating today (one I run myself in my own time, the other I started with a partner almost 20 years ago and he is still in business under his leadership). It includes the time I spent at an ad agency and five years doing some really fun web media job for my university, not to mention all the little jobs I worked on to get where I am now.

Why wouldn't I want to spend my working hours doing something that I like to do? Why wouldn't I want to seek continued employment in that field, where the fruits of my previous work help me move on to the next best? And why wouldn't I want to do something that I can spend a lifetime doing and one day look back at the sum of my work and say, "This I have done" *?

A career plan

Having a career strategy is important. It can help you manage the direction you want your career to take, the job skills and knowledge you'll need, and how you can get them.

Do you need help developing or reviewing your career strategy? We have developed a simple five-step plan to help you get on the right track.

A great career strategy is built on solid foundations

The form of your career strategy will depend on the type of person you are. It can be very structured, or you may just need a few notes in each area, such as knowledge, skills and qualities, what you like to do and

Keep reading

A career plan

Having a career strategy is important. It can help you manage the direction you want your career to take, the job skills and knowledge you'll need, and how you can get them.

Do you need help developing or reviewing your career strategy? We have developed a simple five-step plan to help you get on the right track.

A great career strategy is built on solid foundations

The form of your career strategy will depend on the type of person you are. It can be very structured, or you may just need a few notes in each area, such as knowledge, skills and qualities, what you like to do and the kinds of jobs that interest you.

Step 1: Self-Assessment helps you understand your personal and professional goals, interests, preferences, strengths and weaknesses.

Step 2: Consider your career options and identify which available roles match your interests and abilities.

Step 3: Decide on your career goals

Step 4: develop and implement a career strategy

Step 5: review and adjust your running strategy

Step 1 Self-assessment

Life values

Consider what is important to you. We all have different values, needs, and motivations. Our work occupies a significant part of our day, usually a third or more, and has a significant impact on other aspects of our life, including our sense of self-worth and well-being. That is why it is very important to carefully consider your values ​​and needs when planning your career direction and developing your career strategy.

Use these exercises to help you establish your life values:

  • career planning chart
  • examining life values
  • career / life planning timeline.
  • general requirements of a job.

These exercises will help you decide your preferred and essential job requirements:

  • where I am now
  • motivated skill patterns
  • career questions.

Skills, knowledge and personal qualities

It is important to understand your skills, knowledge and personal qualities so that you can relate them to the jobs you would like to do. This will also help you identify the knowledge and skills you may need to acquire, or the personal qualities you may need, to achieve your career goals. An accurate and realistic assessment of these things is vital to an achievable career strategy.

This kind of understanding is a powerful aid when it comes to selling yourself for potential jobs. It will also increase your self-esteem and confidence.

Try to think of your skills in terms of those that are transferable and those that are specialized. Think about how the skills you use in one job could be used or adapted elsewhere. A smart career strategy must be flexible and adaptable. Therefore, describe your skills in a way that makes them applicable to the widest range of situations.

To assess your skills, knowledge, and personal qualities, use these exercises:

  • what are my skills?
  • What are the requirements of my job?
  • What are my short and long term goals?

Career planning barriers

Despite working hard on your career strategy, sometimes you may run into roadblocks or obstacles that you didn't know about or hadn't considered. The exercise "Examining Barriers Using Force Field Analysis" will help you explore these obstacles.

Step 2 Consider the options

Often the hardest part of career planning and strategy is figuring out which jobs are right for you. The good news is that your choice could be broader than you thought. It is important to consider each of the options based on your values ​​and preferences. Your options are fully described in the following table. You can also learn more about government jobs by browsing these links:

  • Government Of Victoria jobs
  • Jobs for mature workers
  • Australian job search
  • or looking at popular job boards.

Step 3 Decide your goals

Now is the time to make some decisions. Please carefully consider the information you have collected. If you have completed the 'career / life planning timeline', you may have already decided on your career goals (the cornerstone of career strategy) and are ready to enter them into your career planning board.

If you haven't decided what your career goals are yet or want to review them, start by considering your career goals for the next two years. What do you want to do in two years? What about five and ten years? This kind of thinking helps break strategy and career planning down into manageable pieces.

The SMARTER system can be helpful in planning your career goals:

Specific - Be as clear as possible and avoid ambiguous statements.

Measurable - so you can see what you've accomplished.

Achievable - Provides motivation, but also keeps your goals achievable.

Realistic - Be reasonable and avoid the realms of fantasy.

Timely - Create time frames to complete the steps, for example taking short courses or talking to someone about the skills required for a particular job.

Empowerment - Make sure your goals feel good to you and help you make the changes you want.

Reviewable: don't set your goals specifically; be flexible.

Write short, clearly defined statements that you can work on. If you can't identify a specific job you want, state your goals more generally. All of this is part of the fundamentals of a good career strategy. But remember: the more specific you can be, the easier it will be to plan. For example: I want to work in an office, in the Bendigo area, four days a week giving advice to the public.

You may have more than one idea in mind and you may want to keep your options open. In this case, please specify your goals, but keep in mind that you are unlikely to reach them all, so plan accordingly. You can begin to prepare for all of your options, and over time, you will probably gradually become clearer about what you want to do and what goals you are capable of meeting.

Step 4 Develop and implement your career strategy

Now that you have decided on your goals, you can develop an action plan to help you implement your career strategy. Remember, planning will increase your chances of success, but it is important to remain flexible and open-minded. You may have a couple of options that interest you, so take the opportunities to prepare for both.

As you progress, your ideas may become more specific. The career planning chart provides an easy way to gather information. As a starting point, here are some questions to ask yourself:

Career planning checklist

  • Do you need additional information, experience or job skills?
  • What areas of yourself will you need to develop?
  • Do you need to develop a broader network or links with specific people?
  • Are there any courses I need to take (maybe to get specific qualifications or skills)?
  • Do you need to find ways to demonstrate your skills and knowledge so that you can provide evidence of what you can do?
  • What actions should you take to achieve your career goals?
  • Do you need to know more about what it would take to achieve your career goals?
  • Do you need to know more about what is available? If so, how are you going to do this?
  • What kind of work experience would you find useful?
  • What new job skills or knowledge will you need?
  • Do you need to show that you have job skills in particular areas?
  • Are there contacts you can make or relationships you can develop that can help you?
  • Are there any changes you can make in the way you deal with people or work situations that can increase your chances of achieving your goals? How will you start to do this?
  • Who can you discuss your goals with? When are you going to do this?
  • Are you clear about the type of work you would like to do? How can you clarify this further?
  • Do you have a support network? Do you think that you are recognized as capable of contributing information to this network? If not, what could you do about it?
  • Do you have a mentor with whom you can discuss both the technical content and the intangibles of your work? If not, have you considered finding a mentor? Is there someone at your workplace or elsewhere that you can approach?
  • Do you need to make some radical changes to your current address? What are the first steps in achieving this change in direction and how will you take these steps?
  • Do you think you will need to do more studies? What steps could you take to do this?
  • Do you feel in charge of directing your own career? If not, how can you gain more confidence and take charge?

When preparing your career strategy action plan, include WHAT you will do and HOW you will do it. Make a list of the people whose help you will seek and make a time plan of WHEN you will perform each action. The term must be at least 12 months, however a longer period may be appropriate.

Step 5 Review and adjust your plan

Career planning is a way to make the most of your current situation and foreseeable opportunities. Since unpredictable changes and events can occur over time, view your plan as a guide and allow room for adjustments and changes in your approach.

Take advantage of your experiences at work to help you achieve your goals. In general, it will be helpful to review your plan each year. Remember, the career strategy you put into practice at one stage in your life may not be relevant once you have reached certain goals and experienced other work and life events.

Reviewing your strategy will help reinforce and clarify your thinking, and can help you decide whether you need to change your career strategy, seek help or advice, or try harder to achieve your goals.

Personal Career Planning Journals

Keep a continuous journal or log of your accomplishments and the training and development activities you have undertaken. Include any work experience you gain and describe what you learned from the experience. Keep all letters or other communications that provide feedback on your work or other matters, and refer to them when applying for new positions. Reflection and documentation assist with ongoing career strategy planning.

Many people find a loose-leaf ring binder ideal as a professional planning journal, but choose a system that works for you. The magazine will help you understand your career development and will be a useful resource when applying for new positions.

One of the most important topics people ask us and experience ourselves is how to find time for our families, our jobs, our community, and our partner. How can we do it all? We are pulled in so many different directions!

The short answer is to determine what are the "first things" in your life and live your life according to what you have predetermined as the most important things in your life. In Stephen Covey's book "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People", the third habit is "Putting First Things First" and we have discovered that this is key to living our lives the way we want to.

The first step for him

Keep reading

One of the most important topics people ask us and experience ourselves is how to find time for our families, our jobs, our community, and our partner. How can we do it all? We are pulled in so many different directions!

The short answer is to determine what are the "first things" in your life and live your life according to what you have predetermined as the most important things in your life. In Stephen Covey's book "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People", the third habit is "Putting First Things First" and we have discovered that this is key to living our lives the way we want to.

The first step in living our lives the way we want to is consciously determining what is most important in all areas of your life. After determining what you value the most, compare these values ​​to how you actually spend your time.

Brian Tracy says, "It's not what you say or what you intend to do, but what you actually do reveals what is most important to you."

We fill our lives with so many activities and often align our priorities with what is not very important to us. As Mona Lisa Schulz says in her book "Awakening Intuition", "You can't have it all. You have to choose."

We believe this can be a glorious and liberating experience, but it can also be a terrifying and unfamiliar place to venture. The challenge is to choose what you do and how you live, consciously.

We found that your values ​​can change and that is why constant communication is so important. Early in Susie's life, she valued her work and community activities more than now. He spent more time on these activities outside the home and invested more energy in cultivating relationships with many different people. Now he spends more time with his family and his partner Otto.

Before we got together, we consciously determined what we wanted out of our relationship, what we valued. Our values ​​have been clear and we have tried to live and spend our time according to them.

We are not saying that everyone should embrace our values, but we are saying that it is important for you to determine what your values ​​are and to understand the most important things in your partner's life from their frame of reference.

We suggest that you have a family discussion about what each person values. You will find that understanding will be fostered and conflict resolution will be easier in the future.

A great way to determine what is most important to you in your life is to list your answers to the following questions (we're sure you can come up with more)

"What is the most important thing to me in my relationship with my partner / spouse"?

"What is the most important thing for me in my career"?

"What is the most important thing to me in my relationship with my children"?

"What is the most important thing for me in my spiritual practice"?

You get the idea: take a few minutes this week and consciously decide what is most important in your life and your relationships. Schedule a family reunion and ask your family members to do the same.

As Stephen Covey says, "The things that matter most should never be at the mercy of those that matter least." Make sure you know what matters most to you. 1

Footnotes

1 Tips for Younger Men Dating Older Women

There is a difference between a job and a career. A person who accepts a job expects to earn a salary in exchange for the tasks involved. You usually don't take the time to look past that trade and plan for what's next or what might be necessary to grow or increase profits.

The person planning a career is generally motivated to learn more, contribute more, have more voice in the workplace, and earn more. These people have both a short-term and long-term view of a job and see what they can learn and how they can grow in each situation.

A career is only important to him

Keep reading

There is a difference between a job and a career. A person who accepts a job expects to earn a salary in exchange for the tasks involved. You usually don't take the time to look past that trade and plan for what's next or what might be necessary to grow or increase profits.

The person planning a career is generally motivated to learn more, contribute more, have more voice in the workplace, and earn more. These people have both a short-term and long-term view of a job and see what they can learn and how they can grow in each situation.

A career is only important to the person who is motivated by the things I mentioned. I read the story of a man who took a train for an hour to and from work every day for his entire working life. He was a janitor. He could have found work closer to home, but decided against it. He used those two hours to read and over the course of his working years, he read a significant amount. Reading was more important to him as uninterrupted time than developing a career.

At the rate of change that occurs in our world, I do not believe that neither a job nor a career is THE answer for a single person. Very few jobs will offer a working life or a job. Careers are going to change and require new skills. The person who chooses to invest in himself is the one who will choose to be a lifelong learner. It will be the person who assumes responsibility for their working life and their place in the general scheme for reconciling work and personal life. That person will look beyond work and even beyond a single career and chart a path that provides challenge and interest and financial stability to foster the relationships and time necessary to live this unique life that we have.

Other Guides:


GET SPECIAL OFFER FROM OUR PARTNER.