Is the German language important for finding a job in Germany?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Sam Cooke



Is the German language important for finding a job in Germany?

I have been living in Germany for almost 5 years. Berlin in particular, doing software development. Entwickler software for Ich containers. I told that once to the Kontrolleuren who verified passports once, and you never saw the eyes light up as much as Roman candles. They happened to buy me. Partly because I said it in their own language, but they were just blown away überall. Germans respect intelligence. I wish the same would happen with the United States, where I am from!

What others say about Germany in particular is definitely true. In German-run companies, mainly German is spoken, and you would do well to l

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I have been living in Germany for almost 5 years. Berlin in particular, doing software development. Entwickler software for Ich containers. I told that once to the Kontrolleuren who verified passports once, and you never saw the eyes light up as much as Roman candles. They happened to buy me. Partly because I said it in their own language, but they were just blown away überall. Germans respect intelligence. I wish the same would happen with the United States, where I am from!

What others say about Germany in particular is definitely true. In German-run companies, German is mainly spoken, and you would do well to learn it. But that can be a slow process.

In Berlin, it is entirely possible to get by with English alone, and many do, much to the chagrin of the Germans who live here, who wonder why they can't bother learning the language after having been here. during years. Many businesses here are owned by non-Germans, which draws an international crowd, and the default language in that case will be English, hands down.

But if you want to work for some of the most lucrative German firms, you will need to know Deutsch. They may hire you anyway because they are desperate for talent, but you will come across many cases where entire meetings are held in German and they may switch to English just for your benefit, or they can expect you to catch up. . what happened after the fact with his companions. I don't need to explain all the problems with that to you.

Mein Deutsch ist noch schlecht, aber bessern. Germans appreciate that I am making the effort, but living in Berlin, where English is so common, is difficult. In fact, the presence of English has grown since I arrived here, which is very annoying to me. Of course, I would have appreciated that level when I first came here, but now? I strive to deepen my German skills, and I hate when Germans switch to English when they see me struggling. Ich brauche dieser Kampf !!!

But I digress.

Take the time and investment to learn German if you expect to be here for a long time. Just do it. You can start in Berlin or Frankfurt (Berlin is much better!), And then move on to other areas of Germany once you have mastered the language.

It kills me to be able to get a better paying job that I could have easily done, except that they needed full fluency in German. So do yourself a favor and learn sprechen Deutsch.

I am British and have lived in Germany for 4 years.

I have a job and I am not fluent in German, although I can speak enough to survive. I have done the German courses up to B2.1 (go up to C2).

I have a job, insurance, a German mobile phone contract, bank cards, etc., everything you need to live in the modern capitalist world.

When I moved to Germany, I didn't speak a word of German.

The various offices you must go to to register as a resident in Germany (Ameldung), tax offices (Burgensamnt), banks, work centers, etc. WILL NOT COMMUNICATE WITH YOU IN ENGLISH.

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I am British and have lived in Germany for 4 years.

I have a job and I am not fluent in German, although I can speak enough to survive. I have done the German courses up to B2.1 (go up to C2).

I have a job, insurance, a German mobile phone contract, bank cards, etc., everything you need to live in the modern capitalist world.

When I moved to Germany, I didn't speak a word of German.

The various offices you must go to to register as a resident in Germany (Ameldung), tax offices (Burgensamnt), banks, work centers, etc. THEY WILL NOT COMMUNICATE WITH YOU IN ENGLISH, you must speak German, all forms are in German and if you do not speak German all these things will be much more stressful than normal.

Depending on your area of ​​work, you can achieve this if you do not speak English in the workplace. Many of the IT startups in Berlin have English as their first language and German as their second language.

Berlin is different from the rest of Germany, it is very multicultural and many people speak English, although they would prefer to speak German.

The rest of Germany is not that forgiving when it comes to speaking English, many do not speak it and those who do will flatly refuse to speak it unless you have at least tried to communicate in German.

If you choose to live in a foreign country you must learn the language, it is one of the most respectful things you can do in my opinion. and the most satisfactory to be able to understand and communicate in different languages.

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