Is the Canada CLB tough or easy compared to the IELTS?

Updated on : December 7, 2021 by Kylen Howard



Is the Canada CLB tough or easy compared to the IELTS?

CLB is easy compared to IELTS. Take an example from the writing section in CLB where you can take the help of automatic spell checking, whereas in IELTS there is no option for auto-correction. The CLB test takes 3 hours to complete, and on the other hand, the IELTS takes two days to complete the test. In CLB, S / R / W / L is on the computer, while in IELTS there is nothing on the computer.

You need to do some research my friend.

CLB is Canadian Language Benchmark which is defined from IELTS scores. It is not a test.

Check this out: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/immigrate-canada/express-entry/become-candidate/eligibility/language-requirements/language-testing.html

The other test you can take is CELPIP if you don't want to go with IELTS.

If I understood the question correctly

Clb is not a separate exam like ielts or Pte in layman's terms, a Canadian standard for representing your ielts scores

Even if you receive a seven in each module in ielts, it does not mean that you get the clb 9/10, which equates to more points

To better understand what your ielts score represents in clb Google ielts to clb score

S -> 7.5 to 9

L -> 8.5 to 9

W -> 7.5 to 9

R -> 8 to 9

The above score represents a 10 clb

To find out how many points you get for the ielts score Google crs points calculator (Canadian website)

I hope that helps

CELPIP - Canadian English Language Proficiency Program and IELTS - International English Language Assessment System are language proficiency tests that can make a big difference to your Express Entry Comprehensive Ranking Score (CRS). Both tests are accepted by Immigration and Citizenship Canada. Now the question arises which one is easier and which one to choose?

I will try to formulate the complete pattern of these two language tests in the following points:

  • The CELPIP and IELTS are approved and accepted by CIC-Citizenship and Immigration Canada.
  • IELTS is used to study,
Keep reading

CELPIP - Canadian English Language Proficiency Program and IELTS - International English Language Assessment System are language proficiency tests that can make a big difference to your Express Entry Comprehensive Ranking Score (CRS). Both tests are accepted by Immigration and Citizenship Canada. Now the question arises which one is easier and which one to choose?

I will try to formulate the complete pattern of these two language tests in the following points:

  • The CELPIP and IELTS are approved and accepted by CIC-Citizenship and Immigration Canada.
  • IELTS is used for study, work and immigration, while CELPIP is specifically designed to assess the key language skills required for permanent residence and Canadian citizenship.
  • The key test components of these two tests are as follows:
  • The CELPIP score is 1 to 12 for each section, while the IELTS score is 1 to 9 for each section.
  • The listening comprehension section in CELPIP is 47 to 55 minutes; 7 components, a total of 40-46 questions (40 scored) where I eat 30 minutes in IELTS; 4 components, a total of 40 scored questions.
  • The reading section in CELPIP is 55 to 60 minutes; 4 components, 38-45 questions (38 scored) where, as in IELTS, 60 minutes; 3 components, 40 questions.
  • The writing section in CELPIP is 53 to 60 minutes; 2 components: write an email and answer the survey questions, as in IELTS, 60 minutes; 2 components: write a letter and respond to a point of view, argument or problem.
  • The speaking section at CELPIP is 15-20 minutes; 8 components, a total of 8 short answer questions where, as in IELTS, 11-14 minutes; 3 components: Introduction, Individual Speech and Two-way Discussion.
  • The CELPIP is a computer test where IELTS is a paper test.
  • The listening and reading sections of CELPIP contain some unscored items that are used for test development and improvement. According to the CELPIP website, unscored items are indistinguishable from normal-scored questions and can be found anywhere within those two test sections.
  • Before deciding which exam to take, you should also focus on location and price.
  • CELPIP takes place in a 3-hour session on the computer, making it easy to keep track of how much time is left for each of the tasks. When going through sections, CELPIP seems to have longer listening and speaking sections and a slightly shorter writing section.
  • IELTS test takers, on the other hand, do not necessarily complete all components of the test on the same day. Although three of the test sections are completed in the same testing room, the speaking section is done separately at a different time, day, and possibly location (can be taken up to a week before or after the other sections) . There is also no automatic computerized time tracking.
  • I have just presented the test pattern for both tests. There is hardly any difference in the difficulty levels of both tests. It is up to you to decide which pattern suits your needs based on your ability.

Dear Friend,

Getting CLB 10 means you should be reading 8, listening 8.5, and speaking and writing 7.5. Generally, people assume that IELTS is difficult and that they need to read a lot to pass the IELTS test. But I think it is not very difficult, it is a simple test. But when something is simple, it means that going from 5 to 6 points is easier, but going further required a lot of struggle. As I have already done in which the following points should be kept in mind when preparing to reach such a high level. Please note that I am also a student and will be taking the exam in the next 4 months.

  1. When we speak English we use a language that is easy and
Keep reading

Dear Friend,

Getting CLB 10 means you should be reading 8, listening 8.5, and speaking and writing 7.5. Generally, people assume that IELTS is difficult and that they need to read a lot to pass the IELTS test. But I think it is not very difficult, it is a simple test. But when something is simple, it means that going from 5 to 6 points is easier, but going further required a lot of struggle. As I have already done in which the following points should be kept in mind when preparing to reach such a high level. Please note that I am also a student and will be taking the exam in the next 4 months.

  1. When we speak English we use a language that is easy and straightforward, but actually English people speak with some weight in the choice of words, to emphasize their meaning, and they don't repeat much. So there are many words like usually, such, then, that is, there is, it is etc (search in google) we repeat them a lot. But to get a good score, we must use a lot of concentration and words to the point.
  2. Most of the time to connect sentences we use but, and, etc., but actually, there is a huge list of words that we should use in our answer, so our English looks more polished
  3. When writing, we need to write more formal than informal, so this answer of mine is very informal and repetitive, but if I want to write it perfect and more mature, I will again summarize, simplify and use strong verbs in it. .
  4. I can write / speak for hours, but to write and speak professionally I need to rethink, rephrase and correct my grammar for a long time, sometimes I change a lot to explain something very effectively. So my advice is to try to correct yourself, read a lot of what you are writing and then correct.
  5. Lastly, remember to write correct, precise, and error-free sentences that feel good, but to get 8.5 you must be 100% error-free.

Hope this helps you, good luck.

CELPIP is the Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program.

It is an English language assessment tool that measures listening, reading, writing and speaking skills designated by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship of Canada for permanent resident status in Canada and Canadian citizenship.

There are two versions of the CELPIP test: the CELPIP-General test and the CELPIP-General LS test.

The CELPIP-General exam assesses the functional skills of listening, reading, writing and speaking, and is accepted by the IRCC as proof of English language proficiency for permanent residence in Canada.

Another organ

Keep reading

CELPIP is the Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program.

It is an English language assessment tool that measures listening, reading, writing and speaking skills designated by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship of Canada for permanent resident status in Canada and Canadian citizenship.

There are two versions of the CELPIP test: the CELPIP-General test and the CELPIP-General LS test.

The CELPIP-General exam assesses the functional skills of listening, reading, writing and speaking, and is accepted by the IRCC as proof of English language proficiency for permanent residence in Canada.

Other organizations that accept the CELPIP-General Test include the Real Estate Council of British Columbia and the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council.

The CELPIP-General LS exam assesses functional oral and auditory competence, and is accepted by the IRCC as proof of English language proficiency for Canadian citizens.

The minimum required score in CELPIP is 7 in the Canada Express Entry category and in the Federal Skilled Worker Program category it is a minimum of 4.

You've already earned more points than required for public relations. The overall profile points based on the CRS calculator depend on different factors. Since you have the required IELTS score, you need to focus on the remaining items, which are also important factors that lower your overall profile points.

Based on recent drawings, any value equal to or greater than 440 points would earn you an ITA in the express entry pool. The most recent draw in January 2019 had the lower limit of 449 points.

After IELTS, the other items that improve the score are (not the exact list, but the main points that affect the items)

  1. Have an ECA qualified master's degree
Keep reading

You've already earned more points than required for public relations. The overall profile points based on the CRS calculator depend on different factors. Since you have the required IELTS score, you need to focus on the remaining items, which are also important factors that lower your overall profile points.

Based on recent drawings, any value equal to or greater than 440 points would earn you an ITA in the express entry pool. The most recent draw in January 2019 had the lower limit of 449 points.

After IELTS, the other items that improve the score are (not the exact list, but the main points that affect the items)

  1. Have an ECA qualified master's degree (adds 50 to 70 points to your overall profile, which a bachelor's degree + even 10 years of experience is not enough).
  2. Be under 30 years old (if you are a family, either spouse can be under 30 years old with an IELTS score limit of 8 7 7 7 in listening, reading, writing, speaking, respectively, and be the applicant principal).
  3. At least 1 year or more of experience inside or outside of Canada in the same NOC you are applying for PR.

CELPIP can be administered in Canada, the US, or the United Arab Emirates from now on. IELTS has a great list of countries where you can write the test.

Both have some peculiarities, the IELTS is notorious that too many people get 6.5 in oral or written expression, and they keep repeating the exam until they can do 7 in both. When I gave the IELTS, a girl in line shared her experience with another person who scored a 9 for speaking on the first try, but a 6.5 for writing. On the second attempt, he scored 6.5 in speaking and 7 in writing. I myself got a 6.5 in speaking on the first try with an Indian evaluator, but the second time my evaluator was a Caucasian male and I g

Keep reading

CELPIP can be administered in Canada, the US, or the United Arab Emirates from now on. IELTS has a great list of countries where you can write the test.

Both have some peculiarities, the IELTS is notorious that too many people get 6.5 in oral or written expression, and they keep repeating the exam until they can do 7 in both. When I gave the IELTS, a girl in line shared her experience with another person who scored a 9 for speaking on the first try, but a 6.5 for writing. On the second attempt, he scored 6.5 in speaking and 7 in writing. I myself scored a 6.5 on the first try with an Indian rater, but the second time my rater was a Caucasian male and I got an 8 on speaking.

I have not given CELPIP, but I have heard that in the listening section of CELPIP they play a video and the question may even revolve around the clothing or the environment of the characters.

I did both within 1 month of each other, and was able to confirm that CELPIP is a scam. If you take CELPIP-General, Paragon knows you need 9 for your Express Entry, so for sure they will give you 8 in Speech and / or Writing, so you will have to pay for the test again. I've already seen it many times. Here are my results side by side (CLB translation is mine):

Like IELTS, CELPIP is also accepted. Both the IELTS score and the CELPIP score are converted to the Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) to calculate the point. Since CELPIP is specifically for Canada, the points are equal to CLB. Below is the comparison of the equivalent score for IELTS and CELPIP.

As you can see, the score of CLB and CELPIP is the same, for example, to get CLB 9, you need 9 in all CELPIP modules. However, for CLB 9 in IELTS you need a score of 8777 (LRWS).

I hope that helps.

For the current scenario, you need to score around 450 points to get a PR. These points depend on your age, education, your spouse's experience, your background, a Canadian institute degree, work experience in Canada, if any of your family is in Canada, etc. already 450, then the basic band of 6.5 is enough for you. If someone is way behind overall, they may have to get CBL 10 to get a PR.

You can get 12 more points for CLB 10. (3 extra points x 4 RWLS skills)

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