Is plumbing harder to master than carpentry?

Updated on : December 3, 2021 by Analia Franco



Is plumbing harder to master than carpentry?

Anyone who says that any part of any exchange is easy has not done it before.

I never belittle any part of my job by saying it's "easy." Its importance and value are immediately discarded.

Now with that being said, I am a carpenter. Carpenters are often more involved with the GC on a job. We will stick with the residential remodel to keep this simple.

I won't say that plumbing, electrical, HVAC, or other trades are straightforward, but compared to what a carpenter does ... it doesn't even come close. Woodworking covers a large part of what happens on the job. Also, we need to have our sensors out of testing.

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Anyone who says that any part of any exchange is easy has not done it before.

I never belittle any part of my job by saying it's "easy." Its importance and value are immediately discarded.

Now with that being said, I am a carpenter. Carpenters are often more involved with the GC on a job. We will stick with the residential remodel to keep this simple.

I won't say that plumbing, electrical, HVAC, or other trades are straightforward, but compared to what a carpenter does ... it doesn't even come close. Woodworking covers a large part of what happens on the job. Also, we need to have our sensors trying to make sure the whole project is getting done. Usually we are the CG and we need to make sure all the other exchanges share information and don't put their stuff in the wrong place or leave a mess.

Carpenters often specialize. They can be drafters, trimmers, cabinetmakers, exterior / interior cutters, ceiling cutters, stair builders, etc. Some guys who have been doing it for decades may rightly say they're good at everything, but it's not really many of those guys. . If you call yourself a master carpenter, you better be able to back it up.

I can confidently say that I am very good at interior finishes and cabinets, but when it comes to the rest, especially stairs and ceilings, I have a hard time doing it. I can do it, but it takes time. Time is the only thing you don't have when building.

I'm not calling the plumbers. Especially the guys who do remodels. It can be tricky work, and for my part, I don't like to mess with leaks. There is only 100 percent in plumbing. If it is 97 percent, there is a problem.

Too different to compare I think, much of both trades is intuitive, if you were stranded somewhere with all the necessary materials and tools you could probably build a rudimentary structure and some basic plumbing. However, certain aspects of modern plumbing are not intuitive, some modern furnaces or controls are at least quite complex, and without a basic understanding, most will not understand how they work. Now the average person may have everything they need to build a house, but if they have to meet certain standards, I think almost everyone with no experience will ultimately fail, the same with plumbing.

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Too different to compare I think, much of both trades is intuitive, if you were stranded somewhere with all the necessary materials and tools you could probably build a rudimentary structure and some basic plumbing. However, certain aspects of modern plumbing are not intuitive, some modern furnaces or controls are at least quite complex, and without a basic understanding, most will not understand how they work. Now the average person may have everything they need to build a house, but if they have to meet certain standards, I think almost everyone with no experience will ultimately fail, the same with plumbing. My profile says carpenter but the same thing happens to me, in some aspects I am very good at others, such as framing, I do not have much experience. Plumbing, on the other hand, even though I'm not a plumber, I understand this very well, and if I don't know, I can figure it out quite easily (I'm talking more about the mechanics of plumbing, like the controls, what they do, and how to fix them). Much of my experience in ref / ac carries over to plumbing, so it's like another chapter in the same book. Ultimately I think some will naturally adapt to different tasks, I have seen plumbers who cannot trim a door and carpenters who can look at a furnace and don't know where to start and my personal opinion is that anyone would be up to the task. If they've been proposed to it, I think it's almost imperative that you like what you're doing in order to master it. Much of my experience in ref / ac carries over to plumbing, so it's like another chapter in the same book. As a last resort, I think some will naturally adapt to different tasks, I have seen plumbers who cannot trim a door and carpenters who can look at a furnace and don't know where to start and my personal opinion is that anyone would be up to the task if they had it. proposed, I think it's almost imperative that you like what you're doing in order to master it. Much of my experience in ref / ac carries over to plumbing, so it's like another chapter in the same book. Ultimately I think some will naturally adapt to different tasks, I have seen plumbers who cannot trim a door and carpenters who can look at a furnace and don't know where to start and my personal opinion is that anyone would be up to the task. if they have proposed it, I think it is almost imperative that you like what you are doing to master it

Plumbing was a lot easier for me than carpentry, and a lot less danger and effort. The water lines are now mostly PEX and the drains are mostly PVC. It is basically like toy toys. The only dangerous activity I have encountered in plumbing is climbing a steep roof with a heavy auger to wind a drain. On the other hand, with carpentry, I cut myself dozens of times, fell off a roof, fell through a roof, scaffolding collapsed, planks hit me on the head, hit my thumb with most of the other fingers with a hammer, splinters. in my eyes, I stepped on a lot of nails, etc. Also, there are many different aspe

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Plumbing was a lot easier for me than carpentry, and a lot less danger and effort. The water lines are now mostly PEX and the drains are mostly PVC. It is basically like toy toys. The only dangerous activity I have encountered in plumbing is climbing a steep roof with a heavy auger to wind a drain. On the other hand, with carpentry, I cut myself dozens of times, fell off a roof, fell through a roof, scaffolding collapsed, planks hit me on the head, hit my thumb with most of the other fingers with a hammer, splinters. in my eyes, I stepped on a lot of nails, etc. Also, there are many different aspects of joinery such as frame / rough joinery, trim / trim joinery, interior / exterior, ceilings, drywall, cabinets, etc. In plumbing, they are basically water lines and drains (I'm including sewer lines as drains).

I felt comfortable enough to do most of the plumbing work after 2-3 years. I'm still not comfortable doing certain carpentry, like stairs and crown molding after 30 years of carpentry at home.

Plumbing is harder to master than woodworking: - The two don't share much for all intents and purposes, plumbing is substantially more mechanical, woodworking is paramount. We retain the roof so that it does not fall, the operators keep the water where it is needed. As I mentioned, there is a wide variety of work and a lot of room for improvement, and you never get bored ... oh I forgot to mention it, you better get used to getting wet too.

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The two don't have much in common, plumbing is much more mechanical, carpentry is structural. We prevent the roof from falling, the plumbers keep the water where it is needed. I'm a pretty good carpenter (once now strictly truss union) but a lousy plumber. I've also seen the trick a plumber does when he gets cornered in a bit of carpentry. Don't ask either of us to wire a house.

This is a bit like asking if golf is easier to master than tennis. Mastering any trade is a significant achievement. I'm not sure it's useful to compare or rank people at that level in all disciplines.

For each person, the easiest trade to master is the one that best suits their interests and abilities.

No. Woodworking involves a lot of geometry. .. It is probably the most creative of engineering trades.

This depends a bit on what type of carpentry work you are doing and what stage the project is in, but dealing with the weather is the hardest part of carpentry. Unless you are finishing carpentry, you will be exposed to the weather throughout the year.

In summer, you will face temperatures of up to 40 ° C (around 100 ° F for my southerners) with no wind or rain in sight for days. Along with the heat there are also the UV rays that you should be careful with, make sure you have some sunscreen in your bag. Staying hydrated becomes a challenge. Your gear / clothes are soaked in sweat and it's less than nice

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This depends a bit on what type of carpentry work you are doing and what stage the project is in, but dealing with the weather is the hardest part of carpentry. Unless you are finishing carpentry, you will be exposed to the weather throughout the year.

In summer, you will face temperatures of up to 40 ° C (around 100 ° F for my southerners) with no wind or rain in sight for days. Along with the heat there are also the UV rays that you should be careful with, make sure you have some sunscreen in your bag. Staying hydrated becomes a challenge. Your gear / clothes get soaked in sweat and it's less pleasant to carry material from A to B. The glare from the sun reflecting off a plywood or concrete slab also puts a lot of pressure on your eyes. If you're looking to lose a little weight this coming summer, go kick some foundations on a hot day. It is like working in a clay oven.

Autumn is coming and the weather begins to change. The return of the rain and cold breezes. Here in Vancouver, BC, it can rain for weeks. You'll learn that good rain gear is crucial, and you'll quickly find out if what you have is really as good as the labels say. If your rain gear is good, it won't matter too much because you'll sweat from the inside out and still get soaked. Everything you touch is usually wet, from the material to the tools, so your hands begin to prune and split (I refer to these fractures as "dry fractures", and if you ever manage to tuck your beard hair into a , then understand the true pain). Your design will disappear. You will fight to keep your power cables from shorting out and running back and forth towards the switch panel,

As you move into winter, you will face the same problems as fall, except it will get colder and the rain will turn to snow and ice. Hopefully you don't have to work on the roof, and if you do I hope you wear fall protection and not cover it. Workplaces are surprisingly slippery places. You will also have to deal with dark mornings and less daylight, which poses its own problems. Also, have you ever hit a finger with the hammer on a cold day? Holy. Nothing funny. Or did you even try to hold onto a nail with your frozen, numb hands? Pro Tip: If your hands are so cold, lean over so that your chest is 90 ° to your straight legs and start waving your arms like a big seagull. As far back / up as I can, and then roll them along your body so that you hit each other with your hands like a hug. After 20 of those,

With the return of spring, it returns to conditions similar to those of autumn. The thaw has started and you can start working with a t-shirt again. You will get wet and also receive some sun and heat. You'll keep fighting pruned hands, struggling with malfunctioning power cords, and dealing with disappearing design.

Sounds bad, right? Strange to say, you learn to love him. Once you know how to properly prepare for the weather, you will stop complaining so much. You will appreciate the diversity of each day and you will feel a new respect for the environments in which you find yourself. Plus, you'll be a badass.

I moved to the town where I live with the intention of buying and restoring AN old house for my family. I was bitten by the remodeling mistake many years ago and have remodeled more old houses than I should probably admit. It's fun though, and the satisfaction of doing it yourself is nothing short of nirvana to me (sometimes!). I knew that at my age I would not have the opportunity to get a 30-year mortgage, so I decided that this was the best path to homeownership.

As soon as I started working on my old home, city officials told me that unless I hired a contractor, I couldn't just hire a contractor.

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I moved to the town where I live with the intention of buying and restoring AN old house for my family. I was bitten by the remodeling mistake many years ago and have remodeled more old houses than I should probably admit. It's fun though, and the satisfaction of doing it yourself is nothing short of nirvana to me (sometimes!). I knew that at my age I would not have the opportunity to get a 30-year mortgage, so I decided that this was the best path to homeownership.

As soon as I started working on my old home, city officials told me that unless I hired a contractor, I couldn't just hire a plumber and electrician for the parts I didn't want to tackle. . They suggested that I become a contractor so that I could hire who I needed as subcontractors. I thought it was weird, but I went to buy a business license anyway. While I was at city hall, I was approached by a woman who owns rental properties here and asked if I did flats. I answered yes, which launched me into a remodeling business that I had no intention of having. Anyway, over the course of the next seven years, I learned a lot about how buildings go together,

Planning is the first step, and depending on where you plan to build, you will need to plan your utilities, foundations, and make decisions about the type of materials you want to use. Most houses are built on a slab foundation or have a basement underneath. There are other ways, but mainly these are the two most widely used methods. Sketch a drawing of your floor plan that you like (don't worry it's not to scale, you can get into that later) and decide on the features, the number of windows and doors, floors, and what kind of roof to match. Most styles of homes have roofs that are used with that particular style of home. Once you know exactly what you want in your new home, it's time to scale your drawing. I have a copywriting partner who does a lot of drawings for me for my work, and I'm usually not very good at it. so I asked him to prepare my schematic drawings for the plumbing and electrical, ventilation, and airflow system in my new home. He will also develop the plans from which the house will be built.

The choice of building materials will depend on the area of ​​the country in which you live. For example, there are parts of the country with a very shallow water table, where houses are ONLY built on slabs. Similarly, in tornado country, a basement is almost a must.

Enlist the help of a professional for your foundation work, from pouring footers to placing your block, ICF (Insulated Building Blocks that are filled with concrete to form your foundation / basement walls. I prefer to use cinder blocks than They are then skimmed with Quickcrete 500, which is a fiberglass fortified concrete, which forms more of a solid wall, once concrete is poured into the blocks.

Talk to professionals about your electrical and plumbing, and especially talk to your city building inspectors. They can tell you if you will be required to use the services of a professional or if a landlord is allowed to do his or her own electrical and plumbing work.

Write your budget. Building materials themselves aren't that expensive, depending on where you live and what you use, so you want to budget most of your costs for your interior finishes. I can't tell you how many people I've met who have spent a great deal of time building the frame for a house, only to run out of money before finishing interior finishing work. It helps to keep an eye on the things you like, well in advance of your project, buying them on sale and storing them, rather than waiting until you are ready to install them in your new home.

The main "construction" expenses you will incur are: foundations, utilities, floors, roofs, and doors and windows. Almost anything else you can think of is basically up to you on what you spend, but these items don't skimp. They are the most important aspects of your home and must be done well, with a complete understanding of what to do and how to do it. If you think you can't handle a part, definitely spend the money and hire a professional.

I've learned a lot by talking to people and reading DIY sites on many topics. If you are looking for ways to save money on the systems I mentioned above, ask your electrician, for example, if you can run all the wire and ask him to make the final connections at the box. Running cables for your lights and plugs is pretty simple, as is installing plugs and light fixtures. Doing these tasks yourself will not violate any codes and if he has a contract with you for the electrical panel connection, he would probably be happy to earn his money just doing the connections and acting as an advisor to you on the rest. The same goes for your plumber.

Another thing I do is go to pricing companies, where I will go to the big box home improvement stores with my camera and take pictures of the flat, etc. that I would like to have. Then I wait for the sales to be able to get it at the best possible price. You can also get some really good deals on eBay for sinks, faucets, space heaters, etc., but you need to do your research and know what you want before you commit or buy. No one locally, for example, had the light fixtures I wanted for my kitchen, so I found an Ace Hardware in one of the eastern states that had an eBay store, and I was able to get the latest set of fixtures that I had. had been watching. They retail for around 600 total and I was able to get the full set for 150! Same with my copper sink:

I am a true advocate of pay-as-you-go and have a real aversion to being owned by my debtors, so I try not to have any. I sleep much better at night without taking the risk and I bet something could happen that makes me lose what I have, so if you can pay cash on the go, say 500 a week or so, or if you have enough savings to build your house. (drying, walls, ceiling, etc. in - basically a shell) and then allocating a budget and a few hours a week to get the job done will go a long way. Banks will often require you to use a contractor and submit permits, use architectural plans, etc., but there are many reasons to use an alternate method of getting to home ownership, if you have the patience to wait for everything to be done. a. . Good luck for you! :)

That is quite normal. Most kids who have knowledge and experience at a younger age grew up and learned from a close relative. Being late to adolescence is often not so great, as you need to be a little quiet so that you can discipline yourself when the going gets tough. Many kids get involved after school when they need a job. I have worked with guys with doctorates, masters, etc. Much education. It is a kind of French Foreign Legion for employment. Having a college background is actually a huge advantage, as that kind of mental discipline and self-government really

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That is quite normal. Most kids who have knowledge and experience at a younger age grew up and learned from a close relative. Being late to adolescence is often not so great, as you need to be a little quiet so that you can discipline yourself when the going gets tough. Many kids get involved after school when they need a job. I have worked with guys with doctorates, masters, etc. Much education. It is a kind of French Foreign Legion for employment. Having a college background is actually a huge plus, as that kind of mental discipline and self-governance really helps. It is not enough and it is not in itself a credential. But it is a reasonably useful asset.

In non-union carpentry you learn by doing. Usually you start out as a go-fer or day laborer. After learning some of the materials and moving the wood, taking out the tools, putting them away, cleaning, etc., start helping out and picking up the work and learning how to do things. And digging. First learn safety when it comes to site setup, ways to install planks and scaffolding, etc. Shelves, organization of things. You start acquiring tools. You will learn how to use them safely by receiving brief instruction on the basics, hazards, and safe practices, and then using them. Injuries are too expensive, so you probably won't be asked to do something dangerous unprepared. But there are many dangerous things.

You learn vocabulary. The names of things vary by region and it is important to learn to communicate efficiently. YouTube has some very good videos that can help you learn some of the basics of framing and finishing woodwork. Technical knowledge about codes and engineering and related mathematics and other similar book learnings will be your responsibility to learn. Some you learn in context as you build. Some kids use math and calculators. But Victorian carpenters could do things to bend the mind, elliptical segments, arched doors in curved walls, etc. without calculators or math, using templates to generate the curves and other necessary relationships between the parts.

In union joinery, the union actually provides some courses where the instruction is standardized. But you tend to focus a bit on what you need to know for commercial work, with work and instruction interspersed as you go. In your situation, you are more likely to be in a residential area. There are Community College courses and trade schools that offer some useful math and learning books. But most kids learn on the job.

Getting comfortable adding fractions, quickly, in your head is something some struggle with at first. Especially those who have grown up with the metric system and are suddenly faced with an American tape measure.

After about 6 years, you will know a lot. Possibly enough to go out on your own, if you like. You will probably have learned more content than in 6 years of school. And I built a lot of things at the same time.

While I don't even remotely believe in the concept of a self-taught carpenter, I would venture to say that a self-taught person should avoid any sharp or dull tools altogether. Knowing (and therefore learning) how to use dangerous tools is essential to work safely. Why do I deny the existence of a bona fide self-taught carpenter? From a business point of view, and assuming that a person can nail pieces of wood together, doesn't that make them a carpenter, but rather a wood butcher?

From the point of view of the construction industry, a carpenter must have basic knowledge

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While I don't even remotely believe in the concept of a self-taught carpenter, I would venture to say that a self-taught person should avoid any sharp or dull tools altogether. Knowing (and therefore learning) how to use dangerous tools is essential to work safely. Why do I deny the existence of a bona fide self-taught carpenter? From a business point of view, and assuming that a person can nail pieces of wood together, doesn't that make them a carpenter, but rather a wood butcher?

From a construction industry standpoint, a carpenter should have a basic understanding of tools such as saws, hammers, measuring instruments, squares, levels, fasteners, and materials. If you don't know a 2X4 from a 1X6, you are not a construction carpenter and you are not familiar with these materials unless someone, somewhere, has taught you this basic knowledge. If you don't know pine from oak, or the difference between wood for framing and wood for trim / trim, you're not a carpenter. If you don't know the difference between finish saw blades and rough, tear, and cross cut blades, and if you don't know how to accurately position studs, joists, and rafters, you are not yet a building structure carpenter. of buildings. Yes,

What tools should a person need in the position to try to improve their skills? Depending on how basic your skill level and walking on thin ice are with this part of the answer, I would suggest that at a minimum you will need a square, tape measure, pencil, saw, and hammer. With these basic tools and some wood, you can start building things. Don't rush out to buy a table saw, miter saw or band saw, start with a good general purpose hand saw or, if you think you have the competition, a circular saw. Get a saw that you can safely use, with the clear understanding that any manufactured saw can hurt you. The more you get involved in trading, the more obvious it will be, The list of tools that make your work more efficient and accurate is endless. Chisels, chalk lines, drills and bits, different types of hammers, crowbars, levels, different saws, all kinds of clamps, all have purposes and uses that you will learn as you work the craft. And the easiest and fastest way to learn how to use them, how to use them the right way, is to learn from someone who has the knowledge and the will to teach you, not by teaching yourself.

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