Is life just about school, work, more work and dying? Is there something outside of what 'the system' wants us to do?

Updated on : December 6, 2021 by Aiden Marshall



Is life just about school, work, more work and dying? Is there something outside of what 'the system' wants us to do?

It is if you see it like this. School and a lot of work will inevitably be part of your life. However, the reason you do those things makes a difference.

If you go to school and go to work just because you "have" to do those things, then life becomes a Sisyphus routine that will bring neither joy nor meaning. Instead, make everything you do meaningful. Learn with a purpose - it can be as small as trying a new experiment or building something or adding skills that allow you to do more! Do something that ignites your passion! Work with people you think will help reshape the world!

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It is if you see it like this. School and a lot of work will inevitably be part of your life. However, the reason you do those things makes a difference.

If you go to school and go to work just because you "have" to do those things, then life becomes a Sisyphus routine that will bring neither joy nor meaning. Instead, make everything you do meaningful. Learn with a purpose - it can be as small as trying a new experiment or building something or adding skills that allow you to do more! Do something that ignites your passion! Work with people you think will help reshape the world! Follow your passion!

A little secret: those passions I'm talking about are generally things that are meant to help others! The secret of happiness and life in general is to be productive and help your neighbor in any way you can :)

AHA! I am so happy that someone recognizes "the system".

My experience: there is much more to do in life than the system. The thing is, people / society have not been trained to identify this. Therefore, most people wonder what they want to do, when it is something that is not "expected".

There are numerous examples of people who have challenged the system and have done better for themselves and for society.

I highly recommend Steve Jobs's Stay Hungry, Stay Silly Speech. It can guide you better.

No, life is about LEARNING at school, doing what YOU love like work, FOLLOWING your dreams, falling in love, being optimistic and enjoying life to the fullest. Be happy and make the people around you happy. Do something for the less fortunate, help the people who need it most.

Life is how you do it, there is no particular system to live it. And the people who try to impose a system on you, fight against them, don't let anyone order you how to live your life.

There is much more outside of the so-called system. You already recognize that one could be working with a conditioned mindset. So that's an amazing first step. Now, the real task is to understand what is on the periphery of systems and outside their limits. Many are lighting the way and exposing what it really means to live "outside the system." I especially like the work of J. Krishnamurti in this regard. It's a bit abstract, but it does a fantastic job of taking it all apart.

Yes, but you have to be brave enough to take charge of your own life and change it. If you don't, that is exactly what you will get.

Join a work abroad program or any other program that allows you to move abroad and see how others live.

When I did that, it opened my eyes to the possibilities in life. There were so many other ways to live in other countries.

And hopefully, you can marry someone from that country and be able to stay.

Yes, this is life too.

Enjoy, go on vacation, take risks, fall in love. This is life too.

Life has many flavors. You have to try all the flavors.

As for life being terrible in the old days… huh. Human history began, what, in 3000 BC. C.?

So let's see:

  1. 3000 BC - Mesopotamia
  2. 500 BC C. - Daily life in ancient Egypt
  3. What was it like to live in an ancient Greek family?

Many things were based on activities that did not involve mental effort (except for doctors, scribes, or saints who were academics). We have to practice deductive reasoning for a reason. It does not come to us intuitively; it is not, beyond a very basic level, not even necessary for our survival. The community in ancient times was GREATER.

Humans are super social creatures. Interaction with others

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As for life being terrible in the old days… huh. Human history began, what, in 3000 BC. C.?

So let's see:

  1. 3000 BC - Mesopotamia
  2. 500 BC C. - Daily life in ancient Egypt
  3. What was it like to live in an ancient Greek family?

Many things were based on activities that did not involve mental effort (except for doctors, scribes, or saints who were academics). We have to practice deductive reasoning for a reason. It does not come to us intuitively; it is not, beyond a very basic level, not even necessary for our survival. The community in ancient times was GREATER.

Humans are super social creatures. Interaction with others and the community is incredibly satisfying. Do you want to talk about our evolutionary past and hunter-gatherers? Social interaction is what built us and helped us survive.

Unless you were a criminal or a person from a captured state, also known as a slave ... your life was acceptably acceptable. Being a woman was probably (read: definitely) horrible relative to being a man, but in ancient Greece women were allowed a certain degree of freedom with the introduction of the facial veil.

As if there was no air conditioning, they probably all sucked, people were uneducated and I prefer to live now. But when people think of the past in the form of "brutal short life", they are thinking of the fall of the Roman Empire when the Goths said, "RAWRRARRR FUCK YOU ROME WE ARE GOING TO DIE HUNGER". With the introduction of more improved armor and weapons, everyone was saying, "YES, LET'S FIGHT MEOWWW."

After the fall of the Roman Empire, things went to hell in Europe in terms of structure, as people vied for power. The rats had friendly fleas that spread the bubonic plague. Life was truly brutal and short. However, China was quite peaceful and prosperous at the time (~ 1347 when the bubonic plague was hitting hard and everyone hated their lives as peasants in Europe).

So yeah, those time periods in Europe totally sucked. No duh, I prefer to sit at my desk and work so many hours a week in a relatively isolated existence that is a cycle of waking up, working 8 hours, 1 hour of free time, sleeping every day.

But those periods of brutal brutality are not the complete story of life in ancient times either. Being an ancient Egyptian sounds decent, actually. Even if you were a poor farmer, you should get involved in your community and not go hungry.


I recently learned about Europe. What the hell, man ?! I don't want to lose my life, those guys are doing fine. In fact, the prospect of living past 30 and well into 80 is a more daunting and terrifying prospect with waking / working / sleeping in a considerable amount of isolation and cycle of sedentary conditions. I like it, great, keep me alive longer so I can continue to bring out the daylights and put all my life force into the industry.

I don't see any reason to fall in love with the whole of American culture. This part is screwed up. Yes, you get the American Dream ... but do you know how many bloody bodies are scattered and forgotten in exchange for so much industry? Metaphorically, think of all the 19th century "Chinese" who built the railways. They were so damn hard-working and innovative that they tunnelled through the earth to work on the railroads. It was not uncommon for tunnels to collapse on them: they would die with their picks in hand.

They built the greatest engineering and industrial achievement of the American 19th century. What is that worth? Is your life worth? Would these Chinese have seen their sacrifice as worthy if they had the same educational advantages and opportunities (the Internet has democratized knowledge enough) and a different lifestyle?

How much is it worth to you to get a gold star from your boss and not have a lifetime pension anyway today? Dying in a tunnel with a pickaxe in hand?

I think Americans are obsessed with work to an unhealthy and useless degree. There is no inherent virtue in the industry itself.

People will say, "You will change when you are older ... things change." For me to accept what I have seen as something that has contributed to so much pain and destruction individually, it will require another brain injury.

And this one better hit me really well. Erase everything you've experienced and replace it paying attention only to what makes me feel comfortable. One of those things is social inclusion. It makes me feel very uncomfortable in some important ways not fitting in. Despite my discomfort, I intuitively feel this big setback in my stomach when I think about doing some things that would put me at peace in the short term. One of those things is being a "normal" 26-year-old. Do what I am supposed to do when it comes to work, family, etc.

They will condemn me if I follow the path outlined for me, commit my youth and talent to the industry, and die in this country asking for "rights" such as social security or medical care. I absolutely hate how my grandmother has to live because our culture is so screwed up. He worked hard all his life ... and for what? To be forgotten now because it cannot be productive?

Was it worth it for society to kick you in the teeth when you had 3 children as a single mother (when reliable birth control was not widely available) and you could barely do so financially? Was it worth it when you had to work in the steel mills and still couldn't fully supply it? Was it worth it when you had breathing problems due to poor working conditions and suffered into old age with sleep apnea?

No, it's not worth it to me. I hate what happened to my grandmother. I hate how he didn't get a chance to get out. I don't need that "Dream" and I'm tired of trying to get snake oil sold.

And honestly? If the best defense a person has is: "This quality of life is better than the time when the bubonic plague devastated Europe." then probably (read: fucking definitely) room for improvement.

Oh, and I learned that when I started talking to friends from other countries and said, "Wait. Really ?!" And that's when I became a bad American because my goal is to get a high paying job to contribute to society and make myself happy, live frugally and pay my debts, move abroad to retire early and do whatever I want with my time. free. kid-free time (oh, did I mention that I don't see my body as an organic medium for industry either?). :)


So, bottom line: I think humans work too hard in America. I don't plan on living that way; that is not worth it. I found out about 4 years ago.

Random reflection: I would do well as a "work for a living" person, really. This is how I was raised and I work incredibly hard (even for long-term gratification). However, recently (in the last few years), I have not seen my obligation to exhaust myself for the benefit of something other than what I would like to do.

What is the peace or justice in tearing yourself apart to contribute and being told to walk away if you break down due to all that hard work to get the contribution?

I don't need to be sitting on a yoga ball or something to do a good job. I can work very well. But is the grinding itself the end? No. life is too short.

sigh * quora didn't save my answer when I posted it a bit ago so I'm going to make this short and sweet.

Not everyone is cut out to live like most people; Acquire cable bills, expensive phone bills, pay rent, make car payments, live paycheck to paycheck. I found myself working harder and harder to make this work and yet I was only falling further behind.

"How can I make this stop?" I wondered. I was working too hard, I was stressed out, I was concentrating on money just to survive on bills and rent, and yet I was not spending irresponsibly or having extravagant expenses. "I can not pay

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sigh * quora didn't save my answer when I posted it a bit ago so I'm going to make this short and sweet.

Not everyone is cut out to live like most people; Acquire cable bills, expensive phone bills, pay rent, make car payments, live paycheck to paycheck. I found myself working harder and harder to make this work and yet I was only falling further behind.

"How can I make this stop?" I wondered. I was working too hard, I was stressed out, I was concentrating on money just to survive on bills and rent, and yet I was not spending irresponsibly or having extravagant expenses. "I can't afford life," I thought. So I knew something had to give, something had to change, what was it and how could I do it?

He knew it didn't take much to be truly materially happy. Through a slow process I had already removed quite a bit. I didn't need TV or cable because I hadn't seen it for years and I was happier that way, I didn't need to constantly buy clothes or jewelry, I didn't have an expensive phone, a car payment, a lot. from food expenses ... rent was the next big money move.

I wanted to be free, I wanted to go DO THINGS, ANYTHING except work until I was tired and pass out and repeat. So I established a plan.

I wrote a notebook of places to go, hours of operation, specials, free events, free food, locations, etc. At any time of any day, he would know what he could do for little or no money. He had another book, a calendar of all the events and festivals he could participate in or work in to generate income. And then I had a list of friends who agreed that it was a good decision for me, to live out of my car for a trial period of three months, and they agreed to let me shower or stay overnight once a week. With all the friends he had, it was more like once a month, which turned out to be less frequent than he would have slept on his couch or used his shower anyway, because before he had to travel out of town to see them and he would spend the evening.

For the first time I was not tied to my belongings and had something interesting and fun to do every day.

Some people live to work, I found a way to work to LIVE, I enjoyed doing things differently to achieve only what was important to me, even if it was out of the box, I didn't have to worry about workplace politics , job security, losing my apartment, not paying a bill on time, saving money (or rather not being able to do so). Of course, this lifestyle is NOT for everyone, and many people accept this because they are not caught in the cycle that I was in, they are able to find happiness and comfort by living, paying bills, and dying. Some people don't care if they travel or not, some people see it as harder work. It can be, But the hard work I do is much more rewarding for me personally than working hard for a company that does not benefit me adequately. Maybe these people were lucky enough to have better jobs than me,

I currently live in my truck, which I am converting to a motorhome and moving back to Colorado. Never until now have I been able to save money, pamper myself when I want, handle financial emergencies when they happen instead of snowballing into more problems, travel freely whenever and wherever I want (with planning, of course, everything what I do is planned), and be happy. I am the happiest I've ever been and I don't have a home. Any details you would like to know I would be happy to answer through a personal message.

I had asked myself the same question years ago and ended up living in my car for 4 months. So from experience I can say (surprise surprise) that it is not to everyone's liking.

Short answer. Most people cannot leave the comfort of certainty, a steady job, running water, and a large flat screen on the wall.

Gone are the days when most humans were nomads. We have learned to cultivate, to use self-checkout machines and we are much more settled in our lifestyle. The modern lifestyle is much "simpler" when it can be addressed.

People have jobs to get money to impress others with trinkets and to mate or

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I had asked myself the same question years ago and ended up living in my car for 4 months. So from experience I can say (surprise surprise) that it is not to everyone's liking.

Short answer. Most people cannot leave the comfort of certainty, a steady job, running water, and a large flat screen on the wall.

Gone are the days when most humans were nomads. We have learned to cultivate, to use self-checkout machines and we are much more settled in our lifestyle. The modern lifestyle is much "simpler" when it can be addressed.

People have jobs to get money to impress others with trinkets and to mate or maintain relationships. Relationships = babies. Babies = more income needed = more time spent at work, etc. Somewhere between all that there is happiness or so I have been told. Anyway, that's the majority of people. I should know, I'm one of them right now.

So let's say you're the spontaneous type. You're in your 20s, healthy, active, you love the outdoors, and you're bored with life standing still. You'd choose a hammock instead of a fancy £ 1000 sofa. You've been inspired by all the travel photos from travelers on Instagram, plus you have a backup plan in case they go off.

You have a car that is big enough to sleep all 5ft 10. The coldest it gets at night is only 10 degrees C. It also has no dependents (kids, elderly parent, pets, pregnant goldfish), no mortgage, no car payments, he has extremely disciplined bladder / bowel control, loves to be spontaneous and find comfort in tight spaces. - So YES, it may be almost halfway there.

There are MANY questions to ask yourself before you toss the mattress, buy a lot of wipes, and start your 'F ** k the system' lifestyle.

Why?

  1. I was in credit card debt, nothing crazy (around £ 2000) but I was sick of working stupid hours 6 days a week to keep up with repayments. Being in debt meant having to budget, not hanging out with friends, spending money on games, not playing paintball, and eating lots of instant noodles. (I'm half Asian so I was used to noodles by now.) Anyway, after months of this WORK-EAT-SLEEP-REPEAT life, I had enough. Two months of big savings would pay off my debt.
  2. I really love driving and traveling. I was tired of the hum of the workplace drum. He needed less London, more nature. Living in a car would still require income to pay for fuel, insurance, taxes, maintenance, etc. But I wanted to spend less time working and more time doing fun things.
  3. At that time he lived in a small room in a three-bedroom house. The landlord had given us tenants three months to move in because he wanted to renovate the whole house. But time was almost up and it was hard to find a new place that fit my budget. The cheapest place was £ 120 a week, which I couldn't afford.

My car was fully paid for. And you wouldn't need to drive to work every morning if you were to park there. Makes sense.

How?

  1. Stuff; I separated everything I had into 4 parts. LAUNCH, SELL, CAR, STORE. Launching was easy and it felt refreshing, I sold my 42 ″ TV, the guitar I used twice, old PS4 games, books, and everything else that had dust on it. The problem was, there were things like my paintball gear, camping gear, photos, and souvenirs that I couldn't throw away OR sell and took up valuable space in the car. Luckily my job involved storage so I put them on a pallet away from the cameras and voila. Knowing what he needed in the car required a bit of trial and error. Clothes for one week, cold box, mattress / bedding, battery banks, jump cables, tow rope and dehumidifying bags. That was the most minimalist I could get.
  2. Hygiene; There was a 24 hour gym 2 minutes from work for just £ 20 a month. He had a large bladder, but it was nice to know he was 2 minutes and a keycard away from a toilet. I would use the local laundromat once a week and pay £ 1 to vacuum at the service station to clean my car every Saturday and wash my car at work or when it rains.
  3. Relationship - I have (miraculously) a girlfriend. She was the only one who knew about my crazy 'experiment'. She cared about me every night that I lived in the car. But she endured it. She would also be my backup in case something went wrong. By the way, she's STILL my girlfriend. (I know ... she is a guardian).
  4. Food: I didn't want to go to the trouble of saving money on rent just to spend it all on prepared meals every night. He had cooking facilities at work and had a camp stove. Tidy.
  5. Entertainment: There are only a limited number of friends you can visit during the week. So the other times, I watched Netflix. I played games on the iPad, I learned French. I read books. I would use ALL of my 20GB data per month allowance on my iPad and 10GB hotspot data on my phone. Talk about how to make your money count. For everything else, there's McDonalds free Wi-Fi.

Mysteries

  1. This was one of the most difficult problems to tackle. I had to make my car look normal. Luckily the windows were tinted, but I also had to make sure the futon mattress and bedding were folded in the back every morning. nothing was ever left in sight. I had to watch out for the CCTV cameras where I parked. To make things even more difficult, I had to haul my friends around a lot in the back to play paintball, so the rear seats had to be used while all my stuff was in the car.

SO! If ANY of the above criteria had been different, it would not have been able to last a month, let alone 4.

During my 4 months living by car I traveled, I learned a lot and now I appreciate things a little more. Things like friendship, trust, and a room I can stand in. Also, every time I look at a bottle of Oasis, I think "That bottle has an opening big enough to pee."

In the end, what ended my car dwelling was not the way I had to strategically schedule my trips to the bathroom, or the secrets I had to keep, or the uncertainty. It wasn't the fact that I had paid off my debt and saved enough money to travel around France with friends for 2 weeks, or the fact that I had enough to go to Silverstone to see Formula 1. It wasn't even the fact that I found a Amazing place to stay for around £ 65 a week.

It was my relationship. Or at least, the fear of losing it. I didn't want my girlfriend to worry about me anymore. Living in a car puts pressure on relationships, no matter how much she's in love with you. The low ceiling space in my house on wheels had a lot of * ahem * complications.

So now I'm saving for a truck. :)

This is a great question and I don't find it at all strange. I have asked myself the same questions many times. I am not depressed. I am well educated and balanced.

What I share with you is just my opinion. I am very spiritual and not religious at all, which means that my answers do not come from a religious point of view.

First, not everyone has a horrible death. And if we die in a horrible way, there is a positive learning experience behind it. No ... it doesn't seem to be positive at the time, but it is if one can see "the big picture".

What are we really? Our consciousness is a

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This is a great question and I don't find it at all strange. I have asked myself the same questions many times. I am not depressed. I am well educated and balanced.

What I share with you is just my opinion. I am very spiritual and not religious at all, which means that my answers do not come from a religious point of view.

First, not everyone has a horrible death. And if we die in a horrible way, there is a positive learning experience behind it. No ... it doesn't seem to be positive at the time, but it is if one can see "the big picture".

What are we really? Our consciousness is a special form of energy that is aware of itself. This energy is immortal (not alive) and exists quite well on its own. It is completely independent of any form of physical life, such as the human body. This special form of energy is also known as the soul. I understand that souls are "born" (become aware of themselves) and are immortal from that moment on. You and I are souls and we will never, never die. Our bodies die, but we don't.

A human being is a very foolish version of the soul, and crammed into a human shell with severe limitations. And why do we submit to this condition? Learn. Throughout my fifty years of research in this field, I have categorized six important lessons that all souls must learn before they evolve sufficiently to be non-incarnate souls. The six lessons are love, compassion, understanding, humility, forgiveness, and patience. Most of these lessons can only be learned in the physical confines of the human host, not in the afterlife. That is why we are here, on Earth, as human beings.

As new souls, we want to learn who we are and how we fit into existence. Over "time," the best ways we have found to learn and grow is to embody physical hosts and overcome the challenges that bring us knowledge and strength.

We have also found that living many physical lives, as opposed to one long, allows us to learn faster and more efficiently. When we move from one life to the next, we forget about the old ones (usually) and focus on the current ones. Similar challenges are presented to us in our current lives that we did not overcome in our last. And since we don't remember how we dealt with the challenges of our past lives, it is very likely that we will approach our present challenges differently and hopefully overcome them in our current lives.

Let's start with some things that I know are real. I know that I exist. I am aware of myself. It doesn't matter if you, the readers, agree with that or not. I know that I am. If one could extend eternity on one line, what percentage of my life time, compared to eternity, would that be? Almost nothing ... it's such a small fraction. So what's the point of being here, on earth, alive and self-aware, if it's only going to last a fraction of a second compared to eternity, and then I'm gone ... nothing, like it never was ? If that's the case, it doesn't make any sense. For all practical purposes, I am nothing except this extremely brief fraction of self-awareness. So why go through this torture of knowing that I am going to die, one day, and become nothing? All that I have learned everything I've done every person I've helped to have a better life, it's just gone. And those people after me… .. they too will be gone. In less than a billion years, the Earth will no longer be able to support life. It will be gone. If we can't find a way to travel to another world that is compatible with our species, we leave…. We'll become nothing like we never were What good is it if this is all true and we all become nothing? We'll become nothing like we never were What good is it if this is all true and we all become nothing? We'll become nothing like we never were What good is it if this is all true and we all become nothing?

I have done more than fifty years of research on these questions. I have seen and read enough anecdotal evidence to make me believe that the soul is real.

There are two forms of negative energy that affect us in human life. The first is karma. In short, we must feel the pain we have caused others to understand what it feels like and free ourselves from guilt.

The second group of negative energy comes from the six lessons we must learn that I mentioned earlier. How can we fully understand compassion without having felt that pain ourselves? How can we fully understand love unless we have experienced rejection, hatred, or feel unloved? How can we love another person unless we love ourselves?

Overcoming these negatives or challenges makes us positive and gives us strength, thus raising our levels of spiritual awareness. And that's what life is about.

I always wanted to work. It was a feeling of pride. I love my family and I want to support them. I want to use my talents to produce a product for

  1. USAF I repaired aircraft.
  2. The Phone Company I made a drawing or design so that people could have a landline phone.
  3. GE I built part of a turbine section that could be bolted onto an aircraft that could carry troops and military supplies.
  4. McDonalds managed their kitchen and store so people could come in and eat
  5. Byron Photography I photographed brides, children and the elderly to create memories.

You wanna sit on your ass and have some of my pay per d

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I always wanted to work. It was a feeling of pride. I love my family and I want to support them. I want to use my talents to produce a product for

  1. USAF I repaired aircraft.
  2. The Phone Company I made a drawing or design so that people could have a landline phone.
  3. GE I built part of a turbine section that could be bolted onto an aircraft that could carry troops and military supplies.
  4. McDonalds managed their kitchen and store so people could come in and eat
  5. Byron Photography I photographed brides, children and the elderly to create memories.

You want to sit on your butt and have some of my pay for doing 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5, while just using. You just "make" my taxes go up so you "Special Mr." can sit back and do what? Any!? What if everyone else thought your idea was great? Would the government pay for everything?

We are the government. The founders created the freest country on the planet. In the solar system! In the universe! And you are so special that you want me to adopt you and feed you ?????

Animals are not required to eat. Can you rest and wait for another pack, pack, or family to come up to your group and feed them?

Get a job that supports you based on what you can contribute to society. "And then, friend Quoran: don't ask what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country." Google who said that ...

Original question: Why do they force us to work? Why should we pay money to eat? Can't we all share?

It depends on how you see your life "live"; my gift of "living" is to find my soul mate with whom to share my life. But the truth is, most of us are too scared to live life to the fullest when viewed in the context of quitting your job, putting on a backpack, and taking the right path. How do you live, where do you sleep, do you have enough money to deal with emergencies (toothache, pneumonia, possible assaults by vagrants) and if you discover after a couple of days, weeks, a month that this is not for you, why and where do you return? There is a wonderful "adventurer" in my country.

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It depends on how you see your life "live"; my gift of "living" is to find my soul mate with whom to share my life. But the truth is, most of us are too scared to live life to the fullest when viewed in the context of quitting your job, putting on a backpack, and taking the right path. How do you live, where do you sleep, do you have enough money to deal with emergencies (toothache, pneumonia, possible assaults by vagrants) and if you discover after a couple of days, weeks, a month that this is not for you, why and where do you return? There is a wonderful "adventurer" in my country, South Africa, Riaan Manser, who grew up in foster care ... He has traveled the coast of the entire African continent in kayak through Madagascar and Iceland (on the last trip he made a man with disabled legs in his 20s) He has paddled from Africa to New York, he got married the other day and now he is paddling America to Hawaii (his honeymoon trip with his wife) ... and wrote books about all his adventures. Yes, you are "living" life completely on your terms, taking life-threatening risks, going through extreme conditions, and putting your body through the ultimate physical tests to do so. And here are some of the No's you'll have to deal with. No going to the supermarket to buy something you fancy tonight, no microwaves to heat it up because you're pressurized by time, no turning on those lights so you can see at night, no shower or bed to warm your frozen bones. , no friends I can call and say I'm in a hurry here, can you help me? The list of no is over and over again. Few, very few, of us have those kinds of gonads to deal with by not having those everyday comforts that we take for granted. So for us lion-heart types I would recommend finding someone to share your life with, your best friend, your lover, and your confidant ... but not to put you off, if you have the gonads, hit the road, hit. The way. So for us lion-heart types I would recommend finding someone to share your life with, your best friend, your lover, and your confidant ... but not to put you off, if you have the gonads, hit the road, hit. The way. So for us lion-heart types I would recommend finding someone to share your life with, your best friend, your lover, and your confidant ... but not to put you off, if you have the gonads, hit the road, hit. The way.

He will be a sad person who lives his life according to the description of your question! Yes, most of us have to work our way through life. Yes, we are all going to grow old. No old man is not a harbinger of death unless you do.

I am getting older at 70. I retired 6 years ago. I have never been so active. I have found a new life. Exercising, practicing yoga, walking every day, eating healthy, continuing to entertain my social circle, reading, writing, on Quora, traveling, going to the movies and the theater. Visits to museums and holidays in London. My husband is 75 years old. It is still working.

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He will be a sad person who lives his life according to the description of your question! Yes, most of us have to work our way through life. Yes, we are all going to grow old. No old man is not a harbinger of death unless you do.

I am getting older at 70. I retired 6 years ago. I have never been so active. I have found a new life. Exercising, practicing yoga, walking every day, eating healthy, continuing to entertain my social circle, reading, writing, on Quora, traveling, going to the movies and the theater. Visits to museums and holidays in London. My husband is 75 years old. He still works in his business. The difference is that he really thrives on his job and wouldn't quit for nothing.

It does not indicate how old you are, but I suggest that you start trying to change your mindset to put a much more positive perspective on life than you have done with the question. There is the old adage that 'life is what you do'. If it makes it seem boring and boring and a complete task, then it may well turn out for you that way.

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