Is leaving a job for CAT prep a good decision?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Thomas Baker



Is leaving a job for CAT prep a good decision?

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I was thinking

Keep reading

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I thought only of CAT and CAT. I joined as a part-time teacher at TIME. During that period, I met many people who quit their jobs to prepare for CAT. Very few have solved it. So the odds are against those who quit their jobs. Again as I said there is something beyond these statistics and rationality. I thought I could do it (like Po in Kung Fu panda). If I look back, it's that decision I made that has taken me a long way to places I hadn't even dreamed of. If your heart says "Yes", do it. Good luck.

Why you shouldn't quit your job:

At the time of interviews, it would be very difficult to convince the interview panel if you quit your job. So many people decipher CAT while working. So that will be the first question from the interviewers. But, if you can do something productive in that period, you can convince them. I quit my job, but I was working as a teacher. I also did some courses and certifications in Macroeconomic Finance. My interview at IIM-A revolved around macroeconomics. So they were convinced that I had used my time productively.

Also, you don't need all day to prepare for CAT. It's not about how many hours you prepare, but how well you prepare given a time limit. So if you can allocate 2 hours / day in your schedule that would be more than enough.

How to juggle work and prep: Start your day with CAT prep. Doing it in the middle or at the end of the day would be difficult. If you ride the office bus, you can do some verbal preparation on the bus. Take some RC on the go. Spend more time on topics like geometry, algebra, and arithmetic. Choose the questions of the day (10-15 questions) before trying to solve them. Those questions should come from disparate sources (previous CAT articles, TIME material, IMS, etc.). The questions should also be medium / difficult to solve. You can't afford to think of questions you can solve given your schedule. Take a year off one month before CAT if possible.

MY TWO CENTS:

I went through a lot of emotions (anxiety, stress, fear of failure, all fun) during the period I left. A poor score on AIMCAT was enough to make me doubt myself. But the focus and determination were there. I never allowed one bad score to be followed by another. If you're really confident that quitting will create an ideal environment for prep, GO FORWARD.

The problem with such a decision is that you will only know if it was correct, in hindsight. Yes, there are many cases of applicants reaching the best B schools after leaving work.

It may sound philosophical or worse critical, but let me put things in perspective.

The real reason you want to quit is not because you score low on drills, but because you don't enjoy what you do. The simulated scores only gave one reason. If you had enjoyed your work, you wouldn't even think about leaving it for a 170 minute exam.

I will not go through your situation and it is you who must make the decision.

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The problem with such a decision is that you will only know if it was correct, in hindsight. Yes, there are many cases of applicants reaching the best B schools after leaving work.

It may sound philosophical or worse critical, but let me put things in perspective.

The real reason you want to quit is not because you score low on drills, but because you don't enjoy what you do. The simulated scores only gave one reason. If you had enjoyed your work, you wouldn't even think about leaving it for a 170 minute exam.

I am not going through your situation and it is you who must make the decision. Let me leave you with some ideas to ponder before you take that call.

1. Half of the IIM students have work experience.

2. What happens if you don't delete CAT? With a job in hand, you can take the GMAT and apply to better schools.

3. If you pass the CAT, what would you say to the interview panel?

My opinion is: be safe. Try work. If it doesn't work out, find another job and in the meantime pursue your goal of getting to one of the best B-Schools.

Hello there,

Go anonymous because I don't want these idiots at iQuanta filling my inbox with their garbage. Rest assured that I will give them a fair trial.

First of all, what are my credentials to answer this question.
1. Student of the intensive iQuanta course

Scored a 99.xx.
I know the rigors required to pass this exam.

CAT students come in a variety of packages. But I will restrict my classification to two types:

  1. The guy with a solid foundation (read: IITians, NITians, some random guy whose first simulated score was 97+, etc.)
  2. The guy with a weak base (Read: You and me. My first taunt was 80)

Observation 1:

Please look at Indraj

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Hello there,

Go anonymous because I don't want these idiots at iQuanta filling my inbox with their garbage. Rest assured that I will give them a fair trial.

First of all, what are my credentials to answer this question.
1. Student of the intensive iQuanta course

Scored a 99.xx.
I know the rigors required to pass this exam.

CAT students come in a variety of packages. But I will restrict my classification to two types:

  1. The guy with a solid foundation (read: IITians, NITians, some random guy whose first simulated score was 97+, etc.)
  2. The guy with a weak base (Read: You and me. My first taunt was 80)

Observation 1:

See the results of Indrajeet. The results come largely from people who have already arrived with enough masala to break the CAT (Read: Group 1). They didn't learn from iQuanta. They laughed a lot with the coaches, they worked out some group numbers. The only gain they had was that Indrajeet became their friend. And he was probably there when they fucked up some teasing to tell them how he believes in them and how they will surely succeed. And this is the only requirement of these people of a coach. They are already on their way. The coach should keep telling them that they are good.

Let's take a look at why they chose iQuanta because of their friendship.

What's the first thing that comes up when you search for CAT Prep on FB?
Sadly, it is iQuanta. The guys in Group 1 scrolling here and there a bit and eventually find out that Indrajeet is the big wig here. Talk to him a bit. Tell them about your scores, etc. And viola! Indrajeet gets his goose that lays the golden eggs.

Observation 2:

None of the reviews of these results focus on pedagogy and the way a particular subject is taught. They are very superficial in nature. The same over and over again like a broken record. Shortcuts and what not ?! Any embellishment worth its salt will tell you that shortcuts have never helped more than a few common questions (which CAT 2018 would have shown extensively).

For the sake of not digressing, let's get to the heart of this observation.

Reviews are not based on how well the subject is taught. Or even about how they taught a person problem-solving techniques. Or built a robust approach to solving questions.

This says a lot about the review. The Group 1 standard revision will read as follows:

Peer learning blah blah blah. It's a good friend. Bla bla bla. Very supportive. BLA bla. The group helped a lot. BLA bla

Where is the review detailing what that person learned?

Bottom Line: You have a dedicated marketing team writing these reviews. Toppers will still headline and write reviews for the emotional support received. The losers are the people who joined him from Group 2. They learned nothing. They did not grow.

I never see an iQuanta review where a student says it was an 80 and Indrajeet took it to a 99. It doesn't happen. Because ----

Observation 3:

Indrajeet has no credentials. The only credentials you have are:

“INDRAJEET SIR IS A QANT FACULTY GIVEN BY GOD. PHUCK OFF ”- Generic group 2 student

Believe me clearly on this, only a girl / boy who has traveled and conquered the rat race from 80 to 99 himself, can accurately tell you what it takes. The emotional courage, the pain faced, the hard work, the blood, the sweat, and the tears needed to get there.

A 97–99 cannot tell you how to get there. Heck, even a 98-99 can't tell you this.
And still expect Indrajeet of all people to guide you? It hasn't even cracked the CAT. And I'm sure you can't. After all, the generic iQuanta Group 2 student cannot change what is on their grade sheet.

We live in a country of idol worship. And we are all looking for a saving figure to help alleviate pain. And people tend to follow the herd without proper investigation. And we end up with a false god. (Sounds familiar?)

Which brings us to toooooo: Followers of this Godman!

Observation 4:

1. Generic group 2 student tricked into working for iQuanta due to Godman syndrome

Usually it comes from Bihar. (No offense to any Biharis whatsoever, you are the epitome of test taking. No one does it better and more passionately, and therefore more likely to be fooled by scammers
. ) Develop a good relationship with Indrajeet. You think you are learning a lot (you are not - this will be addressed in Observation 5). The poor man does not even realize that he is not growing.

But they have brainwashed him. So he's defending Indrajeet. Intimidate others who say things against you. (They are usually found as moderators of your group)
Deleting comments. Write positive reviews. Entering direct messages from people who opine against iQuanta (which is why I am anonymous).

A dialogue from Mirzapur (Kaalin bhai to her son) comes to mind

"Logo se gundagardi karwao, khud gunda mat bano"

2. Group 2 student who becomes disillusioned with iQuanta and starts asking questions

It happens that you are trying very hard and, despite doing everything you were taught in class, you are not able to develop the ability to solve problems. Blames himself for quite some time. Try to understand what is wrong. He realizes the magic formula! And he immediately understands that the classes were silly.

He goes to FB and Quora to prevent people from falling into this trap. Leave some reviews. Comments.

ALL REMOVED by Generic Group 2 Student tricked into working for iQuanta due to Godman syndrome.

And you end up getting bullied by these guys on Messenger anyway.
So he decides to leave.

Observation 5 (This is a real one directly related to the studies and does not question IJ's ethics):

Facebook learning. Post by mail. You cannot expect to develop a problem-solving mindset by watching questions that are posted with textual solutions. If I wanted this, why the hell wouldn't I read a book? And that's also by an established author like Hall and Knight who plays out in the right way. It teaches you to fish. Not a single fish throws you. (Or in the case of iQuanta, a very small, weak ass fish that you can't do much with)

Resolution of doubts: first, you must think about a doubt for long periods of time. And secondly, getting a solution in textual format is definitely solving. A question solving session requires you to understand the mindset and knowledge gaps that prevented you from solving the question. If I needed it on a sheet of paper. I could read a book.


I am tired of writing.

TL DW.

Sorry.

But in essence

If you are a group 2 girl looking to become a big shot. Find your own way. A guide can only help you 20%. And if you finish with IJ, you will get sidetracked and he will eventually block you.

I wish you every success for CAT 19. Be smart. Do your research well.

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I was thinking

Keep reading

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I thought only of CAT and CAT. I joined as a part-time teacher at TIME. During that period, I met many people who quit their jobs to prepare for CAT. Very few have solved it. So the odds are against those who quit their jobs. Again as I said there is something beyond these statistics and rationality. I thought I could do it (like Po in Kung Fu panda). If I look back, it's that decision I made that has taken me a long way to places I hadn't even dreamed of. If your heart says "Yes", do it. Good luck.

Why you shouldn't quit your job:

At the time of interviews, it would be very difficult to convince the interview panel if you quit your job. So many people decipher CAT while working. So that will be the first question from the interviewers. But, if you can do something productive in that period, you can convince them. I quit my job, but I was working as a teacher. I also did some courses and certifications in Macroeconomic Finance. My interview at IIM-A revolved around macroeconomics. So they were convinced that I had used my time productively.

Also, you don't need all day to prepare for CAT. It's not about how many hours you prepare, but how well you prepare given a time limit. So if you can allocate 2 hours / day in your schedule that would be more than enough.

How to juggle work and prep: Start your day with CAT prep. Doing it in the middle or at the end of the day would be difficult. If you ride the office bus, you can do some verbal preparation on the bus. Take some RC on the go. Spend more time on topics like geometry, algebra, and arithmetic. Choose the questions of the day (10-15 questions) before trying to solve them. Those questions should come from disparate sources (previous CAT articles, TIME material, IMS, etc.). The questions should also be medium / difficult to solve. You can't afford to think of questions you can solve given your schedule. Take a year off one month before CAT if possible.

MY TWO CENTS:

I went through a lot of emotions (anxiety, stress, fear of failure, all fun) during the period I left. A poor score on AIMCAT was enough to make me doubt myself. But the focus and determination were there. I never allowed one bad score to be followed by another. If you're really confident that quitting will create an ideal environment for prep, GO FORWARD.

The answer is a BIG NOOOOOO !!!

In fact, I feel like the best time to prepare for CAT is while working, that's for the following reasons

Work experience - Having work experience will add weight to your profile. All IIMs give weight to work experience and the weight varies from IIM to IIM

2. One Year Gap - If you have completed your Bachelor's degree and took a year off for CAT preparation or if you have worked for a few years and left your job to prepare for CAT, a one year gap will be created in your profile, Although it will not be an obstacle when entering an IIM, but it can become an obstacle during placements, since

Keep reading

The answer is a BIG NOOOOOO !!!

In fact, I feel like the best time to prepare for CAT is while working, that's for the following reasons

Work experience - Having work experience will add weight to your profile. All IIMs give weight to work experience and the weight varies from IIM to IIM

2. One Year Gap - If you have completed your Bachelor's degree and took a year off for CAT preparation or if you have worked for a few years and left your job to prepare for CAT, a one year gap will be created in your profile, Although it will not be an obstacle when entering an IIM, but it can become an obstacle during placements, as some of the companies may have criteria of no gap of one year in their entire career.

Now getting to the hard part, how do you prepare for CAT even while working?

First of all, deciding whether to opt for coaching or not?

a) I would suggest that if you have already taken coaching once, either during your undergraduate degree or while working, no coaching will be necessary.

b) If you have not coached before, you have to decide if you opt for coaching or not, because nobody knows you better than you. If you think you can crack CAT, all that is required is some practice, then you'd better prepare yourself. Or if you feel like I need special guidance to solve the questions more effectively, then go for coaching and weekend coaching is best for you.

Once you've chosen any of the options above, let's talk about preparation now.

Ideally, 1 to 2 hours on weekdays and 4 to 5 hours on weekends will suffice, I would say more than enough. I would like to mention one very important thing here and that is MOCKS.

The reason I mention it specifically is because there were some mistakes that I made during my preparation and I don't want any of you to do it.

The very important thing in the preparation of CAT is to opt for a series of MOCK tests, whatever the level of your preparation MOCKS are mandatory for everyone, the mistake I made was that I did not give many MOCKS and I did not analyze my tests well, how many more MOCKS write and analyze, the better you will come back.

In fact, the best way to type MOCKS when the exam is only a few days away is to take a mock test exactly 9-12 (if possible) continuously for 15-20 days with 15-20 days left for the exam. The reason I am asking you to do this is because both your body and mind will get used to the exam environment and you will be able to perform better.

PS: I broke CAT while working in a multinational manufacturing company.

What is the most important aspect of your preparation that will lead you to one of the best B schools? It is being disciplined, working 20 hours a week and having a result at the end of each session of your study. Two factors that are important for preparation, discipline and performance.

What do I mean by exit? Students have told me that there are so many videos on the internet and some amazing faculty members, who have been watching those videos continuously. I usually ask them: “Good! What is the result of your preparation? Can you now solve the level 2 and level 3 problems in geomet?

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What is the most important aspect of your preparation that will lead you to one of the best B schools? It is being disciplined, working 20 hours a week and having a result at the end of each session of your study. Two factors that are important for preparation, discipline and performance.

What do I mean by exit? Students have told me that there are so many videos on the internet and some amazing faculty members, who have been watching those videos continuously. I usually ask them: “Good! What is the result of your preparation? Can you now solve level 2 and level 3 geometry problems? Can you get more precision on your RCs? Or are you just watching videos and not working on your materials? "

This may sound counterintuitive, but with the Internet, there is a problem of abundance and therefore the aspirant has to make difficult decisions. If you make the wrong decision, you could lose a year or enter a university far below your potential.

No teacher is perfect and no CAT course is perfect. But there are many courses and teachers that are really good. Your first step should be to stick with one of those courses without straying from "other free courses or videos" and so on. The result will be much more pronounced and your ability will begin to improve. Once the mockCAt starts, it will start to identify your gaps. At that time, your current course or teacher may not have the capacity to fill all of your gaps. This is an imperfection that every CAT coaching institute will have. At that point, you can look for specific solutions outside of your current course.

If you consistently stick to one source and don't get lost in the world of multiple teachers, courses, free videos, and the like, you'll have very few loopholes that need additional support. Many students get lost in that world because it is quite entertaining and can give you a high.

Unacademy, as I see it, is a world of abundance. It has so many teachers in each area and each one is competing for your attention to be chosen over the others. All of them are definitely good (but also imperfect). You will see that most of them talk about shortcuts to get your attention. In another post, I talked at length about how 'shortcuts don't help and it's average students who are impressed by shortcuts and how it's just marketing hype.'

Madhu Namboodiri's answer to How do I develop shortcuts for the Quant section in CAT and other MBA exams?

If you join Unacademy, you will have to choose a teacher for each subject (among many) and stick with it. Look at the others, only if you find that the current teacher is not able to fill the gap that was discovered during the simulations. Will you have the discipline for that?

Disciplined work: How many hours of classes are needed to cover the entire CAT syllabus? Maybe 120-150 hours max (average students). That's roughly 75 two-hour sessions or roughly 18 weeks of four sessions per week. In addition, it has 'clarification sessions' and 'simulated CAT analysis'. These classes are just a base for you to practice 20 hours a week with your materials. Therefore, 80% of your time should be spent solving problems alone and not searching for better teachers and better videos.

Most online courses (including Unacademy) give you the flexibility to watch videos whenever you want and work at your own pace. This is a bonus for good super motivated students who don't have too many loopholes. For the others, in my opinion, it is a great disadvantage. It's always good to have a personal mentor who will set the pace and get you running at the pace you need to get to your dream college. As a mentor, these "pacing sessions" is something that I persist with with my students.

In conclusion, if your purpose is to get into a top B schools, you have to think about performance and discipline.

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I was thinking

Keep reading

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I thought only of CAT and CAT. I joined as a part-time teacher at TIME. During that period, I met many people who quit their jobs to prepare for CAT. Very few have solved it. So the odds are against those who quit their jobs. Again as I said there is something beyond these statistics and rationality. I thought I could do it (like Po in Kung Fu panda). If I look back, it's that decision I made that has taken me a long way to places I hadn't even dreamed of. If your heart says "Yes", do it. Good luck.

Why you shouldn't quit your job:

At the time of interviews, it would be very difficult to convince the interview panel if you quit your job. So many people decipher CAT while working. So that will be the first question from the interviewers. But, if you can do something productive in that period, you can convince them. I quit my job, but I was working as a teacher. I also did some courses and certifications in Macroeconomic Finance. My interview at IIM-A revolved around macroeconomics. So they were convinced that I had used my time productively.

Also, you don't need all day to prepare for CAT. It's not about how many hours you prepare, but how well you prepare given a time limit. So if you can allocate 2 hours / day in your schedule that would be more than enough.

How to juggle work and prep: Start your day with CAT prep. Doing it in the middle or at the end of the day would be difficult. If you ride the office bus, you can do some verbal preparation on the bus. Take some RC on the go. Spend more time on topics like geometry, algebra, and arithmetic. Choose the questions of the day (10-15 questions) before trying to solve them. Those questions should come from disparate sources (previous CAT articles, TIME material, IMS, etc.). The questions should also be medium / difficult to solve. You can't afford to think of questions you can solve given your schedule. Take a year off one month before CAT if possible.

MY TWO CENTS:

I went through a lot of emotions (anxiety, stress, fear of failure, all fun) during the period I left. A poor score on AIMCAT was enough to make me doubt myself. But the focus and determination were there. I never allowed one bad score to be followed by another. If you're really confident that quitting will create an ideal environment for prep, GO FORWARD.

Thanks for the A2A.

Before leaving your job, you need to consider what is at stake. Also, it's not just a four-month matter, as a lot of people get it confused. The whole business of preparing Cat to convert calls extends over a much longer period of time.

The cat test takes place in the first week of December. So the standard time to start preparation is from August to July. After the cat, you may want to take other tests to keep more options open. This includes nmat, xat, and snap. Thus, the entire process will continue until mid-January. It's been almost 6 months!

Then come the results in mid-January to F

Keep reading

Thanks for the A2A.

Before leaving your job, you need to consider what is at stake. Also, it's not just a four-month matter, as a lot of people get it confused. The whole business of preparing Cat to convert calls extends over a much longer period of time.

The cat test takes place in the first week of December. So the standard time to start preparation is from August to July. After the cat, you may want to take other tests to keep more options open. This includes nmat, xat, and snap. Thus, the entire process will continue until mid-January. It's been almost 6 months!

Then come the results from January to mid-February. You'll be busy up to your neck filling out forms for your favorite institutes. Preparation for the / gd / wat interview should be taken as seriously as cat. Calls for interviews will run through mid-April. Therefore, 10 months have passed!

Therefore, leave your job only if you are motivated enough to join an MBA university. Don't try to do the balancing act looking for new job openings during this 10-month period, as it will ruin your preparation. Also try to come up with a good credible story to tell your interviewers, as they will definitely ask why you left the job. Many achieved miraculous results by giving this leap of faith, while the reverse is also true. Best of luck!

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I was thinking

Keep reading

Why you should quit your job:

A few years ago I was in a similar situation. I followed the advice of many. "Everyone" said not to quit, including my mom. They said that quitting smoking does not guarantee you a good CAT score. Yes, they were rational. They were right. You might have a bad day or a bad 15 minutes that could ruin your score. Still, I quit my job. There is something more than mere rationality that gets us to where we pretend to be. I wanted to break CAT by hook or by crook. I never had a Plan B. I put my heart and soul into preparation. Every minute during my preparation I thought only of CAT and CAT. I joined as a part-time teacher at TIME. During that period, I met many people who quit their jobs to prepare for CAT. Very few have solved it. So the odds are against those who quit their jobs. Again as I said there is something beyond these statistics and rationality. I thought I could do it (like Po in Kung Fu panda). If I look back, it's that decision I made that has taken me a long way to places I hadn't even dreamed of. If your heart says "Yes", do it. Good luck.

Why you shouldn't quit your job:

At the time of interviews, it would be very difficult to convince the interview panel if you quit your job. So many people decipher CAT while working. So that will be the first question from the interviewers. But, if you can do something productive in that period, you can convince them. I quit my job, but I was working as a teacher. I also did some courses and certifications in Macroeconomic Finance. My interview at IIM-A revolved around macroeconomics. So they were convinced that I had used my time productively.

Also, you don't need all day to prepare for CAT. It's not about how many hours you prepare, but how well you prepare given a time limit. So if you can allocate 2 hours / day in your schedule that would be more than enough.

How to juggle work and prep: Start your day with CAT prep. Doing it in the middle or at the end of the day would be difficult. If you ride the office bus, you can do some verbal preparation on the bus. Take some RC on the go. Spend more time on topics like geometry, algebra, and arithmetic. Choose the questions of the day (10-15 questions) before trying to solve them. Those questions should come from disparate sources (previous CAT articles, TIME material, IMS, etc.). The questions should also be medium / difficult to solve. You can't afford to think of questions you can solve given your schedule. Take a year off one month before CAT if possible.

MY TWO CENTS:

I went through a lot of emotions (anxiety, stress, fear of failure, all fun) during the period I left. A poor score on AIMCAT was enough to make me doubt myself. But the focus and determination were there. I never allowed one bad score to be followed by another. If you're really confident that quitting will create an ideal environment for prep, GO FORWARD.

Your decision to pursue an MBA should depend on what you want to get out of it.
Simply having an MBA degree may or may not be in line with your life goals. An MBA degree is good if you see yourself working hard for 14-15 hours a day and your goal in life is to earn some money.

Start-up, on the other hand, is about your passion. You may or may not be successful, you may not make as much money, but you will be in a position to make decisions, make a change in society, and take greater control of your life and choices. how to raise your child. Need com

Keep reading

Your decision to pursue an MBA should depend on what you want to get out of it.
Simply having an MBA degree may or may not be in line with your life goals. An MBA degree is good if you see yourself working hard for 14-15 hours a day and your goal in life is to earn some money.

Start-up, on the other hand, is about your passion. You may or may not be successful, you may not make as much money, but you will be in a position to make decisions, make a change in society, and take greater control of your life and choices. how to raise your child. You need commitment and passion, there are no fixed hours that you have to dedicate. It's a 24/7 thing. It's about independence but with greater risk.

My advice would be not to do things to build your profile, do things that make you want to achieve more and in which you grow as a person.

Stick with TCS if you want easy money and a relaxed job, a free-flowing life, and those occasional bonuses and promotions and financial stability. lean toward managerial roles), then keep your job and push yourself, my dear friend, to reach the rung.

Joining a new company provides further learning as you would be more involved in the projects that come your way. Since the labor force would be less, there is a greater scope for self-development and learning.

However, if you are absolutely sure that you want to assume leadership and build something from scratch, then pursue your dreams.

Just a friendly tip, a startup is about 1% idea and 99% execution!

The final choice is up to you and depends solely on what you want to achieve in life. None of the options you mentioned is bad. All you need to do is make a decision and try to stick with it with a 100% commitment.

All the best!

Hey,

It is not the best option to quit your job to prepare for CAT. I even had a sabbatical, but in most of the interviews I had, they didn't ask much about it. But the thing is to post-plan too, if you don't crack CAT, keep this in mind, you have a bunch of other exams waiting for you like XAT, Snap, etc. This will reduce your stress.

So since you have this work experience, please take 2 years for you to get the benefit of that during the admissions process. And depending on your level in CAT, exit accordingly. I have seen this video of a certified public accountant who leaves his job for 2 months.

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Hey,

It is not the best option to quit your job to prepare for CAT. I even had a sabbatical, but in most of the interviews I had, they didn't ask much about it. But the thing is to post-plan too, if you don't crack CAT, keep this in mind, you have a bunch of other exams waiting for you like XAT, Snap, etc. This will reduce your stress.

So since you have this work experience, please take 2 years for you to get the benefit of that during the admissions process. And depending on your level in CAT, exit accordingly. I have seen this video of a certified public accountant who leaves his job 2 months before the exam and gets rid of CAT. So, depending on your ability, quit the job.

I hope that helps.

It is not advisable to leave a job and prepare for CAT bcs IIMs think that the cat can be prepared along with his work and if he leaves his job and prepares for CAT then he will also not be able to do multiple assignments in the Institute, therefore he becomes against the applicant to quit work and prepare for CAT.

IIMs have such a mentality because the companies that come to campus also have the same mentality that seeing the gap in your resume they turn negative about you, that you cannot do various things and that can work against you to get a job.

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