Is it wrong to apply at the same company but with a different location?

Updated on : January 17, 2022 by Ahmed Jacobson



Is it wrong to apply at the same company but with a different location?

I wouldn't put it wrong (implying moral judgment), but I would say it could backfire if you are applying for professional positions. Most organizations that have multiple locations tend to have a centralized HR team that handles recruiting and hiring. It's okay to apply for different positions, but know that your resume or application will probably be reviewed by the same people.

One caveat is if you're dealing with entry-level service jobs, like in a restaurant chain. In that case, recruitment is likely to be done at each store.

Sure why not?

Large companies don't compare applications to see if the same person is applying for more than one job. They wouldn't really care if you apply for more than one position at a time. If you are a desirable candidate, someone who would be desired as a permanent employee, I'd be happy to have a couple or more ways to bring you into the family.

It is not the same as if you were trying to woo a boy's two daughters, trying to marry one of them. The father, with all property, would object to that. because his daughters are not tradeable commodities, and he is

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Sure why not?

Large companies don't compare applications to see if the same person is applying for more than one job. They wouldn't really care if you apply for more than one position at a time. If you are a desirable candidate, someone who would be desired as a permanent employee, I'd be happy to have a couple or more ways to bring you into the family.

It is not the same as if you were trying to woo a boy's two daughters, trying to marry one of them. The father, with all property, would object to that. because his daughters are not tradeable commodities, and he is not trying to take you to his family in any way possible.

The real issue is whether you would be satisfied with the lowest-level, most accessible entry position if you were denied the most desirable job. My guess is, probably not. Naturally, I would be grateful to have the entry-level salary instead of being unemployed. However, that sentiment will soon fade and be overtaken by resentment at your underemployment relative to the higher-level job that you think you are truly qualified for.

Regardless of what reason they may give you for turning you down for a higher job, you are not going to change your mind that it is the one you really should have. In that case, you won't be highly motivated in the lower-level position, and you probably won't do very well. It's worse than if you got stuck with the ugly daughter, but were still in line to inherit some of the old man's fortune. Instead, he would soon begin to feel disinherited, in entry-level work.

So while it's okay to ask for both, I don't think it's very wise. If you think you're really qualified for the higher-level job, go for it. Do the best selling job you can to get hired. On the other hand, if after reflection you see that landing the top-level job is really just a fantasy, focus on accepting the most available entry-level job.

In other words, choose one or the other of the daughters; and be happy and faithful if she agrees to marry you. But if the one you choose says no, then look for a new girlfriend, from another family.

This depends on a few things. To begin with, many companies are not interested in applying for positions above a certain level. They would prefer that no random person ran for their vacant vice president position. Odds are they won't hire such a person, and now they're just increasing the buzz regarding apps. For high-level positions, they will likely use an outdated recruiter or networking contacts. Also, they probably don't want to make it known to the world they are looking at because of the message it might send about the intern.

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This depends on a few things. To begin with, many companies are not interested in applying for positions above a certain level. They would prefer that no random person ran for their vacant vice president position. Odds are they won't hire such a person, and now they're just increasing the buzz regarding apps. For high-level positions, they will likely use an outdated recruiter or networking contacts. In addition, they probably do not want to make it known to the world they are looking at because of the message it could send about the internal situation of the company.

For the average entry-level job, you need to think about the problem from the perspective of the company. There are costs associated with improving your online application process, primarily that someone needs to get paid to design and implement a better system. So what are the benefits of these costs?

"More applicants" would be your first answer, I guess. And having a larger pool of applicants would improve your chances of finding the best person, right? Well maybe. Let's think about what we are saying here. If we made the system easier, we would get more applicants. Sure, but who are those new applicants?

Answer: the people who would have given up if the system had been a little more onerous. These people are likely not the type of candidates that a company would want to hire. Either they don't care enough about the company to go through a relatively minor inconvenience to even apply for the job, or they do care but are too lazy to fill out a form on an annoying website. Neither of these types of people sound like an ideal candidate.

As for the videos of current employees, I would say that, in general, they are not intended to convince people to apply. They are intended to improve the image of the company. Not only are they a great company to buy, they are a great company to work for! You must entrust us with all your business needs because we have happy and smart employees! You should admire us, as so many people want to work here! We have a large number of applicants to choose from, so our people are the best!

Also, many times companies will post an ad on their website after they have filled the position through other means (recruiters, personal connections, etc.). They do it simply because they have an obligation to do so, either legally or due to company policy.

Right away ... I don't think I can identify with where you come from ... so it continues ... you may not identify with my answer ... maybe you don't even like it :) :) :) But I hope you give it a try and I hope it helps you :) :)

I believe that we must defend our own truths and realities, we must be true to ourselves always and always, without exception. I think it is a sign of accepting and respecting ourselves for who we are.

So, first of all, don't call your reasons insignificant. Maybe your HR and other people consider them insignificant (believe me, they actually don't), but if you consider the

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Right away ... I don't think I can identify with where you come from ... so it continues ... you may not identify with my answer ... maybe you don't even like it :) :) :) But I hope you give it a try and I hope it helps you :) :)

I believe that we must defend our own truths and realities, we must be true to ourselves always and always, without exception. I think it is a sign of accepting and respecting ourselves for who we are.

So, first of all, don't call your reasons insignificant. Maybe your HR and other people consider them insignificant (believe me, they actually don't), but if you consider them petty as well, there is no chance others will join in. In my experience, it's people who choose to make things work ... even things that seem impossible to other people.

Next… present it well. If your reasons are that your family and friends are there, don't avoid it. Be safe and reasonable. Everyone understands the need for a supportive social circle, especially the family. In fact, this is one of the most important reasons for choosing a location when it comes to employment. Everybody knows. Don't minimize it in your head, this is important.

Be confident and express your intentions (why just your HR? Can't get your senior to recommend you for a location transfer?). Get them on your side. Let them know that you are dedicated / fully committed to the company and that you would like to continue with them, and that is why you are not interested in another job at the location of your choice.

If you still cannot muster trust and do not wish to elaborate, simply tell them that you have personal family reasons that are confidential and that you cannot discuss. But make sure they see you as an asset, that they are aware of your intention to stay with the company and do it!

Good luck Rupam!

Yes, you can apply for multiple jobs at the same company, but this can be dangerous in some situations.

Risks:


  • It may seem like you don't know what you are trained for, especially if the positions are very different (in terms of skills, salary, duties, etc.).
  • It may seem like you are desperate for a job and will accept whatever position is offered.


To do:


  • Choose your openings carefully. Apply only for positions that you think are very suitable. And if possible, try to apply for positions that are at least somewhat similar in terms of salary and qualifications. This will show
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Yes, you can apply for multiple jobs at the same company, but this can be dangerous in some situations.

Risks:


  • It may seem like you don't know what you are trained for, especially if the positions are very different (in terms of skills, salary, duties, etc.).
  • It may seem like you are desperate for a job and will accept whatever position is offered.


To do:


  • Choose your openings carefully. Apply only for positions that you think are very suitable. And if possible, try to apply for positions that are at least somewhat similar in terms of salary and qualifications. This will show that you are not applying what you want or what you want for each vacancy.
  • Create custom cover letters and resumes for both positions.
  • Consider explaining that you have applied for multiple openings in your cover letters, especially if you are applying at a small company where there is likely to be only one recruiter or hiring manager. For example, you could write: "I applied for position xxx, but if I am not selected for that position, I would be happy to be considered for this position." Or, if you are equally interested in both, you could say, "I applied for the xxx position, but I am also very excited about this vacancy. Please consider me for both." Or you could say, "Please consider me for whatever position you think is right for me."
  • Lastly, don't be afraid to take the risk. If it's worth it, it's worth it. I have definitely hired people who have applied for multiple openings.


Thanks for the A2A and good luck!

One of my first jobs as a human resources assistant was logging into the resume database and deleting the resume of any candidate who had applied for each job. *

My advice is to apply for the position you are most qualified for and once you enter the interview, you can say 'I would be open to another job too, but I thought my skills matched more with this one.' You can also write that in the cover letter if you get the feeling that this is one of those companies that is reading them.

If all the jobs you are applying for have the same job title then my friend its time to get on LinkedIn and how

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One of my first jobs as a human resources assistant was logging into the resume database and deleting the resume of any candidate who had applied for each job. *

My advice is to apply for the position you are most qualified for and once you enter the interview, you can say 'I would be open to another job too, but I thought my skills matched more with this one.' You can also write that in the cover letter if you get the feeling that this is one of those companies that is reading them.

If all the jobs you are applying for have the same job title, then my friend, it's time to get on LinkedIn and ask some people who work there. Are they different teams? Are they simply training staff for the same roles and looking for the exact same candidate? Is there a slightly different role in some way? Then apply, but again, start with the role you feel most qualified for and then once you get in the door you can emphasize that you are interested in other things as well.

* And yes, there were some who applied for the 13 posted internships and I don't recall how many roles, including one, the C-level executive position, that was posted. Do you think these people really believed they were qualified to be both CFOs and interns? No, they thought it was a numbers game and if they applied for 50 positions they were 50 times more likely to get a job. But they forget that even with technology there are people on the other side. It is not just a numbers game, and most companies really want to find the best candidate for each role and may feel insulted or annoyed when someone wastes their time requesting things they are not qualified for.

Check the following things before actually taking a step into another company:

  1. Is moving to another company the last solution?
  2. Why haven't you been promoted? What are the ratings and recommendations for the last 5 years? (If your previous performance ratings were very poor, the company may not have considered your promotion case, but it is not possible to get ratings below par for 4-5 continuous years, and in that case, the company might have. fired)
  3. Since you didn't get promoted? (If it is more than 5 years, it is cause for concern).
  4. What is the company's policy in this regard? (If the company continues
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Check the following things before actually taking a step into another company:

  1. Is moving to another company the last solution?
  2. Why haven't you been promoted? What are the ratings and recommendations for the last 5 years? (If your previous performance ratings were very poor, the company may not have considered your promotion case, but it is not possible to get ratings below par for 4-5 continuous years, and in that case, the company might have. fired)
  3. Since you didn't get promoted? (If it is more than 5 years, it is cause for concern).
  4. What is the company's policy in this regard? (If the company follows a policy of promoting people on an average of 3-4 years, then you should speak to HR.)
  5. How is the promotion rate of other people in the department or in another department? (If the other people in the department or the people in another department are being promoted except you, then you should check with your boss and HR.)
  6. What are the benefits of being promoted in the company versus the losses of leaving the company?
  7. What are the chances of obtaining a higher qualification or designation at another company? (If you are sure you can get it, please do so)

If you get the answers to all the questions listed above, analyze them to decide which way to go.

Question no. 2, 3 and 4 are important to know the promotion trend in the company.

Thanks for asking…

I was able to do this. Although it's not immediately ideal and may surprise recruiters handling your various applications, it's perfectly fine to show your interest in the same roles in different cities.

The idea that most forget here is that you need to be upfront with your recruiters and the hiring team about why you have multiple applications for the same job.

Before accepting a position in my current position, I had applied for the same position across the country. During the closing of my interview, I made it clear to my interviewer that I requested

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I was able to do this. Although it's not immediately ideal and may surprise recruiters handling your various applications, it's perfectly fine to show your interest in the same roles in different cities.

The idea that most forget here is that you need to be upfront with your recruiters and the hiring team about why you have multiple applications for the same job.

Before accepting a position in my current position, I had applied for the same position across the country. During the closing of my interview, I made it clear to my interviewer that I applied for the same position in a different region. The answer I got was "I figured out, why apply both at the same time?" The hiring managers for both jobs were in constant communication and noticed my name as a candidate for both positions. My response was: "I am very interested in this position and I am willing to move if necessary."

If I am applying for the same job at two different locations, can you find out and not hire it?

There are two possible ways to understand this question and I'm not sure what the intention was.

If I am applying for the same job that is posted in two different geographic areas, can the employer see this and not hire me?

It is trivially simple to identify which location is most suitable for you, assuming your location is part of the information you provide. Every day I reject applicants who are not within a reasonable travel distance.

Applying for a position 300 miles from your current location is almost certain

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If I am applying for the same job at two different locations, can you find out and not hire it?

There are two possible ways to understand this question and I'm not sure what the intention was.

If I am applying for the same job that is posted in two different geographic areas, can the employer see this and not hire me?

It is trivially simple to identify which location is most suitable for you, assuming your location is part of the information you provide. Every day I reject applicants who are not within a reasonable travel distance.

Applying for a position 300 miles from your current location will almost certainly guarantee that you won't get considered - that's not a smart job search.

If I am applying for the same job that is posted on two different job websites / portals, can the employer see this and not hire me?

It won't matter where you find the opportunity if you are the right candidate.

Yes.

Every job application we make is unlikely to turn into a job offer, or even a job interview. Therefore, there is nothing wrong with launching your broader network. HR folks know that of the thousands of resumes they receive, they only want to speak to x% of these candidates.

Additionally, a business can be so large that its dual applications are likely to go unnoticed.

If asked about this, simply explain that you were drawn to both roles and that you wanted to try your hand at applying.

Your actions should be viewed as admirable rather than calculating. You are showing ambition and assertiveness when applying fo

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Yes.

Every job application we make is unlikely to turn into a job offer, or even a job interview. Therefore, there is nothing wrong with launching your broader network. HR folks know that of the thousands of resumes they receive, they only want to speak to x% of these candidates.

Additionally, a business can be so large that its dual applications are likely to go unnoticed.

If asked about this, simply explain that you were drawn to both roles and that you wanted to try your hand at applying.

Your actions should be viewed as admirable rather than calculating. Show ambition and assertiveness when applying for more than one position. It's likely what your potential new boss did to get his current job.

All of the above assumes that there are no major conflicts of interest or sensitivity in their current and applied roles. For example, applying for one does not jeopardize your current position and others.

Good luck.

It depends on the rule of the company. There are companies that do not accept applicants who have already worked for them, especially if they left on bad terms. So clear that up with the staff first.

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